Volkswagen Passat Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yet again, I need advice on a work situation. I had posted a couple weeks ago about being passed over for a promotion and got some good advice from some people here. It was comforting to know that being passed over had everything to do with office politics and nothing to do with my performance or attitude. Pretty sad that my two bosses still cannot give me a "real" reason why I was passed over. Basically it came down to the VP's daughter getting a better position and someone throwing me under the bus. Which is how it felt when it was made known that I did not get the position. Anyway....

As big of a slap in the face as being passed over was, I really want to turn the tables on my current employer and show them up by doing my job the way I've always done it, if not better. This current job works so well with my personal life, it's close, the internal environment is very lax and there will be opportunities in the short future. Not to mention a bonus will be paid in May.

My question is, how does one tactfully and professionally inform their boss that they have been offered another position? Like I said, I really do not want to have to leave this job, but if an attractive offer elsewhere is made, how do I inform my current employer and ask them to meet both the money and opportunity?

I would never do it in a threatening manner or be unprofessional as to not burn any bridges, but I've never really had to do this. Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,730 Posts
[Street • City • State • Zip Code]
[Phone # • Fax phone # • Messages phone # • Email]

[Date today]
[Recipient's name]
[Company name]
[Address]
[Address]
[Address]



Dear [Recipient's name]:


Please accept this letter as my formal notice of resignation from [Company name], effective [date, two weeks from date above]. The associations I've made during my employment here will truly be memorable for years to come.


I hope a two-week notice is sufficient for you to find a replacement for me. If I can help to train my replacement or tie up any loose ends, please let me know.


Thank you very much for the opportunity to work here.
Sincerely,


[Sign here]

[Your name, title]
cc [Names for copies]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,116 Posts
RottyB5A2 said:
My question is, how does one tactfully and professionally inform their boss that they have been offered another position? Like I said, I really do not want to have to leave this job, but if an attractive offer elsewhere is made, how do I inform my current employer and ask them to meet both the money and opportunity?
If I follow where you're going with this - you don't. If you get an offer someplace else that you want to take, you resign. Maybe they'll try to keep you by counteroffer, but that is not likely. This isn't anything against you, it's just the way the world works. As soon as they find out you're willing to take a job elsewhere you become a liability. It's up to you to speak up if you think your compensation/position should be better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,730 Posts
Macabre said:
If I follow where you're going with this - you don't. If you get an offer someplace else that you want to take, you resign. Maybe they'll try to keep you by counteroffer, but that is not likely. This isn't anything against you, it's just the way the world works. As soon as they find out you're willing to take a job elsewhere you become a liability. It's up to you to speak up if you think your compensation/position should be better.
I missed it. I thought he was looking for a resignation letter sample. I agree with Mac, don't present a resignation letter without a job offer in hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
952 Posts
Lay it out on the table, but in a discussion rather than you giving an ultimatum. Highlight what you like and enjoy about the current job and raise your questions (money, responsibility, performance). If they agree on how you think you've performed, then asking for more money/time/responsibility shouldnt be a problem. Bring up the other offer only if they don't seem willing to work with you. Not so much as a threat, but to show them that you are valued and wanted by someone else. (don't say you went looking, but the others came to you with an offer)

I had a similar situation at my last job. When it came time for my review, they were pleased with my performance but when it came time for compensation, they were stingy. I had another job lined up and knew the benefits package and stuff, and used that to direct questions to my old boss. When the old boss was unwilling to budge on pay and benefits and responsibility, he pretty much made my decision. Needless to say, I quit the old job and started the new job within a week with more money, benefits and responsibility in a more relaxing environment.

I didn't burn bridges, but it is business. If it's a family-like atmosphere, they will hear your pleas and work to keep you there. If they're like my old boss, employees are machines and replaceable.
 
2

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
If you and your boss are on a common ground and speak to each other regularly, i would say simply ask im if he values your work ethic and ability, to which (if he's not a dick) he will reply of course he does. then simply state how much you like the job, the environment and the people you work with and for.

Then tell him your were recently made an offer, and you would like to show/tell him about it, to see if it's something he would be interested in countering, because you would really rather stay then leave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
I agree with Macabre.
You don't want to get yourself in a position where you are backing your employer against the wall OR painting yourself in a corner. It sounds like you really enjoy your job, the company, etc. But it also sounds like the promotion - thing is still leaving a sour taste in your mouth. (Have I used enough over-used metaphors, yet? :rolleyes: )

Are you comfortable enough to go to your boss and let them know how much you like your job / appreciate working there, but would like to know what they expect from you so that you would be considered for the next promotion/advancement?

Whatever you do, don't go to them with "another offer..." unless you really are willing to leave and you feel the other opportunity will be better than what you already have.
 

·
The "Odd" one
Joined
·
6,068 Posts
Definately do not "threaten" to leave without something to back it up. I wouldnt even give them a hint that you might be looking elsewhere. Once you find another job and feel comfortable making the move, do it. I wouldnt even entertain a counter offer. I have seen many counter offers taken and as soon as someone has to go...they think of the guy who was looking to leave before...and guess who sticks out. I have also seen counter offers turn into pay him a little more so he will stay but in the mean time lets find someone to replace him/her. As unfair as it may seem business is business and there is very little, if any, loyalty from either the employee or employer anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,143 Posts
Macabre said:
If I follow where you're going with this - you don't. If you get an offer someplace else that you want to take, you resign. Maybe they'll try to keep you by counteroffer, but that is not likely. This isn't anything against you, it's just the way the world works. As soon as they find out you're willing to take a job elsewhere you become a liability. It's up to you to speak up if you think your compensation/position should be better.
Agree with Mac.... Wow that hurt. ;)
Seriously tho, if your employer/boss is a prick deep down, they/he/she may go so far as to make you an offer to stay then in a month or two, terminate you due to "cutbacks". Happened to 2 people I know. Like Mac said, once you make that statement, you're looked at as disloyal. They may make a move like I stated above or simply say "Then go." There is no employer loyalty anymore. They seem to go out of their way to keep half-asses and let people who are assets go...
 

·
Lefties have rights, too!
Joined
·
15,695 Posts
As a manager I would never make a counter offer to an employee. Usually one goes through a trememdous amout of mental anguish to decide to look for a job and then interview. Meaning the employee is ready to go by the they have a job offer. By making a counter offer the employee is going to only stay for a while until their attention gets distracted somewhere else. Plus it is bad for morale. Soon eveyone will want counter offers. If you want to leave then leave. If you want to stay then stay. Don't get wishy washy on me.

My $0.02
 

·
needs more cowbell
Joined
·
5,946 Posts
VWGUY4EVER said:
There is no employer loyalty anymore. They seem to go out of their way to keep half-asses and let people who are assets go...
this pretty much sums it up. as well as what Tom Parish suggests.

sounds like you've made your mind up. just be sure you have something lined up when you have your talk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
I would just turn in a resignation letter and leave. If you go to your Manager with the offer from the other company, it will create an akward atmosphere for you, unless the two of you are close. What are you going to do, if they match the offer and you stay, but pass you over again next time?
 

·
Salty Moderation Stylez
Joined
·
12,663 Posts
Tom Parish said:
As a manager I would never make a counter offer to an employee. Usually one goes through a trememdous amout of mental anguish to decide to look for a job and then interview. Meaning the employee is ready to go by the they have a job offer. By making a counter offer the employee is going to only stay for a while until their attention gets distracted somewhere else. Plus it is bad for morale. Soon eveyone will want counter offers. If you want to leave then leave. If you want to stay then stay. Don't get wishy washy on me.

My $0.02
Agree 100%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
this is all business - you are in it for YOU - heck your honest too - you have given them so much hard work and dedication all to be jipped by some daddys little girl. You should be strong and set up a face to face meeting - go in armed when you get a second offer - go in with facts on your qualifiations/revenue generated/comparision to average company or office output and highlight your ongoing education and years of dedication. have a firm # in mind 5% higher than what your settling for. if they say no and you do get another offer - give them two weeks notice and get to stepping without looking back. anyone who treats you differently within the last two weeks there doesnt deserve a second thought because THEY are being unprofessional. If they say NO to ur requests and you do have another offer just write a short to the point letter (sans appologies or explanations) and be proud that your heading to where your talent and hard work will be better appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
Salty D said:
Agree 100%
i think it depends on the profession?
my moms work isnt so much about money as it about titles and publications so she is always getting offers from mountains and weird places alike. some work sectors are heavily and viciously recuited with no regards to professionalism or respect for other managers.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top