Volkswagen Passat Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1998 1.8T 5spd manual

Significant "woe, woe, woe" vibration noise from front passenger side wheel.

Tires balanced
Cv axle replaced
Hub bearings seemed ok

Tech with stethoscope said the vibration was coming from inside the tranny (right where the cv axle fits into tranny case) but was not 100%.

Is this even likely? I've not ever heard of bearings INSIDE the tranny going bad like that no shifting/slipping problems - but I'm no expert.

Any for sure way to tell For Sure so I can decide how I want to proceed?

Thanks.


-sobieski
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,336 Posts
I've never heard of the trans bearing making that noise when worn, but I have seen the cause leaks as the inner flange wobbles. I would expect the wheel bearing is the issue and it just transmits the sound through the axle to the trans. If the noise changes with the wheel turned (while driving), it is the wheel bearing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,569 Posts
1998 1.8T 5spd manual

Significant "woe, woe, woe" vibration noise from front passenger side wheel.

Tires balanced
Tire imbalance won't cause a periodic noise like that. But a defective tire can. I was so certain that there was a bad wheel bearing, that I had one on order before I swapped tires from the Passat to the A4, which had the "wheel bearing" noise. It was gone with another set of tires. So perhaps try a wheel/tire swap, or at least a front-to-back rotation, and see what happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys.

I will definitely be visiting the tire shop as my first next step.
Then wheel bearings if needed.

Appreciate your getting back to me.


-sobieski
 

·
Moderate Moderator
Joined
·
16,464 Posts
If the noise changes with the wheel turned (while driving), it is the wheel bearing.
Try the test PZ talked about above. It costs nothing to do. The best way is to find a long sweeping curve you can take at speed. You'll want to find one that turns left and also one that turns right. Sometimes you can do this test on a multi-lane road by changing lanes. What you're trying to do is place a good side-load on the bearings and listen to them while they are under that load. Steering to the right places a lot of extra load on the left bearing. Steering to the left places a lot of extra load on the right bearing.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top