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Discussion Starter #21
I took it to my friendly mechanic. He took it for a test drive and told me it was my passenger REAR bearing. Apparently both passenger side bearings were bad, the rear more so.
BUT I still have a locking brake issue - picked up a new line today.
Will update once work is done.
 

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as previously posted, two questions: "He took it for a test drive" didn't he notice front passenger wheel/rotor/caliper getting hot?, and secondly and actually a premise, does he realize/know that the front bearing is directional in it's installation?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I discussed the caliper issue with him before he drove the car. I was telling him that after changing the bearing, the noise, rumble, etc. was still present. We did not discuss the brake caliper issue as the rumlbe is Classic wheel bearing, not stuck caliper. I have had stuck calipers before on other cars and none have ever exhibited this speed related condition.
Thunk.....Thunk...thunk..thunk and so on as you get faster. And I have NEVER had a stuck caliper noise go away completely when changing steering aspect.

Please note I am not being snarky - just trying to get to the bottom of this. I do really appreciate EVERYONE's input..

This guy is not the shop that did the bearing pressing. I have to assume that the shop that did the work did it correctly, otherwise I am not sure how it could actually be working. The inner and outer sections are two different sizes - I would think that would be hard to 'eff' that up....

SOOOO -after my long-winded post, do I order a bearing and spend too much money having it placed in the hub assembly or can I order the whole assembly from AutoHaus AZ? I cannot determine for certain if I can order the whole thing for my car or not. I do NOT have 4-motion and the hub assembly is often listed as for the 4-Motion.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Note I have a new rubber line to install to remove all possible failure points for that side's brakes...
 

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Unless I am missing something there is still the very likely, possibility of a faulty caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I suppose - but the mechanic likely used the handbrake test method - which I should have thought of - to see if the noise was affected when applying the brakes.

What I am asking is could a stuck caliper be unstuck by turning? Would any related noise be abated by sharply turning to one side? And this is a brand new caliper (not a guarantee of practical functionality, of course...).
 

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Discussion Starter #27
What I am suggesting is that even if the caliper is bad (I did have a very hot wheel), I may still have a bad rear bearing. I am thinking that I might have both...
 

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I still think the brake must be rubbing to get the wheel that hot but if the bearing is installed crooked or is bad it could cause the rotor to contact the pads and generate the heat. It seems really odd that everything appears OK when turned by hand though. Maybe the weight of the car is causing the bearing to go sideways or something. Or maybe the bearing is loose and turning makes it move back and forth from 'good' to 'bad' or maybe ????
 

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The noise and the heating are most likely two separate faults.
A faulty or badly installed caliper could cause the heat in the front wheel.
A bad rear wheel bearing could cause noise.
 

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My $0.02 is that a bearing would self-destruct before creating enough heat to get the entire wheel that hot
That's right; heat must come from friction, and a ball bearing by definition is very low friction. It would have to be totally destroyed with the balls not rolling to be hot.
The brake works on pressure but its retraction is based on the "relaxation" of the hydraulic pressure.
Basically true. The square-section rubber piston seal is what pulls the piston back slightly when hydraulic pressure is relaxed. It deforms from square to a parallelogram-shape when the brakes are applied. When the pads wear enough, the piston slips a little from the seal's grip.
 

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Hopefully the OP will reveal the root cause of the heat, my only input is the result of personal experience of putting on brand new front rotors and pads,ironically when I did the wheel bearings as well. Piston do to interior corrosion (inside of boot) would of course push out with the hydraulic pressure generated by the master cylinder, I mean that's its job,but when "relaxed" nada retraction, after 50 mile commute ,literally "toast" ......50 shades of blue
 

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Noticed nobody mentioned looking at the rotors for signs of discoloration, although that my be a given. If so, it can only be brake related.
New caliper.

Just the caliper or the bracket/carrier as well?

New guide pins and retention spring?

Pics help a lot. I've done more brake jobs on these things than I care to remember; many of us have. Maybe we can spot an oddity or something out of place.
 

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What I am suggesting is that even if the caliper is bad (I did have a very hot wheel), I may still have a bad rear bearing. I am thinking that I might have both...
I am going to come off as a bit of a jerk here but you already said the mechanic diagnosed the rear wheel bearing as bad in a previous post...yet you are asking the forum what we think about that. Are you looking for the forum, who has never driven the car, to confirm a mechanic's diagnosis?

Additionally, almost every response the forum has provided indicates a problem with the brakes. Caliper, rotor, flex line. You said that the brakes were last redone in 2014, that's 6 years ago, that's pretty darn old. If the car doesn't get many miles put on it per year, that's probably even worse as the calipers and guide pins have time to get stuck in place.

If you got the spindle off to have the front bearing replaced, removing the caliper and rotor to inspect them should be trivial for you. Take some pictures and post them and then we can all take a look again.

One potential thing that MAY have occured, if the bearing was indeed worn badly and the rotor was sitting at an angle inside the caliper it make have worn the pads themselves such that they are no longer perpendicular to the ground and instead are only parallel with the rotor itself. When you put everything back together and the alignment of the bearing restored you now have pads that are constantly contacting the inner upper edge and the outer lower edge of the the rotor.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I am not mad at anyone for what they ask or state - doing this sort of thing by messages is like arguing with my wife by text - sometimes things sound worse than they were really intended...

I am just asking thoughts on what I have been told.

I did replace the front caliper because it was totally frozen. I did not replace the flex line at that time, however I have a new line in my possession that I will install this weekend. I did not replace the pads as they do not appear to be out of 'square'.

I received a new rear hub yesterday made by FAG. Here is my next problem - I cannot get anything other than the short end of an allen key on the upper caliper bolt as the damn brake line is ever so slightly in the way. Any ideas?? I really did not think one would need to disconnect the brake line to pull the caliper...

And I will report back on what the eventual outcome is. Note that up until I started this repair effort, I have driven this car to death. And kinda hard. She likes it rough.... OK, TMI, sorry...
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Never mind - I see what I was doing wrong. Need to take off the piston part from the bracket FIRST.
I am such a doofus sometimes...
 

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Discussion Starter #36
ok - replaced the hub, and the old bearing was very toasted. And, surprise, the rear caliper was also stuck. To be fair, I have never changed the rear calipers in the 10+ years I have owned this car. So they had one in stock and it is all assembled. Just need someone here to help me bleed the system. Then I can let everyone know if all issues were addressed.

I spun out in snow a few years ago. I spun around 180, slid down a sloped median and bumped kinda hard into the bottom of the roadside ditch for the other direction of the road. No visible damage, but I would wager that is what prompted both bearings to fail...
 

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Did you have the alignment checked after the crash? The rear twist beam and rear lower control arm are easy to bend.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I did have it aligned. After that I replaced the entire front suspension and had a 4-wheel alignment.
 
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