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I have a 2003 Passat B5 which has a slow leak of the coolant, I need to add around 500 ml of coolant every two weeks. The pink coolant is getting expensive to replenish, so I am thinking about just using the distilled water. The car is otherwise running fine, but still, I don't think it is worthwhile to find a shop to fix the leak for such an old car. What do you guys think? any opinion or suggestions?
 

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Running the car on water alone will reduce cooling efficiency and eliminate the corrosion resistance proper coolant provides. If you plan to scrap the car in the next month or two, and live in an area which will not experience hot weather... go ahead and save some money. Otherwise, not.
 

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It is likely to boil, increase pressure in the system and overheat the engine.

If you don’t want to fix the leak, you could drain the VW coolant and run with cheaper coolant (they don’t mix well with the VW G12). Note that it could increase corrosion and cause leaks, but you have that already.
 

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Peak makes a low cost coolant that can be used in place of the OEM G12. It's about $20 a gallon 50/50 premixed.You should totally flush the system with water first.
99599
 

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what motor? why not fix the leak?
probably something like the ECTS o-ring or something else.....that is an under 10 dollar part....its just finding which part and then getting to it can cost you 500+ if you are paying a shop to do it.
 

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I had a similar situation with my 3.0 B6. A small drip became a pint of water added per day, until I took it off the road after getting an A5. I suspected heater hoses; below the battery shelf they are close to impossible to see, without removing the intake manifold, moving a wiring harness bundle, and so-forth. I finished the job last weekend, which besides the hoses, included new pre-cat O2 sensors which are also impossible to reach otherwise. The whole problem was a bad coolant pipe O-ring, a $0.50 item that takes hours to reach. So at the end, I mixed my G13 and distilled water, filled and purged the air, then took it for a drive on Saturday. Then the supply hose at the front of the coolant reservoir blew off, and there went my coolant! Luckily I was already back on my driveway when it happened. I had forgotten to reinstall the spring clamp in position.
 

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The whole problem was a bad coolant pipe O-ring, a $0.50 item that takes hours to reach.
I thought it was that one on my B5.5 2.8 (the one under in the intake manifold). it wasn't. I did learn (after I took the manifold off) that you can look at the right angle after the ignition coil is removed and you can see if you have evidence of coolant coming from there or not. saves like 6 hours.

It ended up being that even though the ECTS seat was cleaned, new o-ring and sensor were installed with a new clip, there was not enough pressure from the clip to not let any coolant leak. I ended up making a shim and slipping it under the clip, leak solved.

Not sure if the passat b6 uses the same the 3.0l as the a4 b6 (from what I have learned here the b6 a4 is a lot closer to the b5.5 passat) so the same hole may exist to sneak a peak there too.
 

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I thought it was that one on my B5.5 2.8 (the one under in the intake manifold). it wasn't. I did learn (after I took the manifold off) that you can look at the right angle after the ignition coil is removed and you can see if you have evidence of coolant coming from there or not. saves like 6 hours.

It ended up being that even though the ECTS seat was cleaned, new o-ring and sensor were installed with a new clip, there was not enough pressure from the clip to not let any coolant leak. I ended up making a shim and slipping it under the clip, leak solved.

Not sure if the passat b6 uses the same the 3.0l as the a4 b6 (from what I have learned here the b6 a4 is a lot closer to the b5.5 passat) so the same hole may exist to sneak a peak there too.
The B6 Passat engines went transverse and thus used the 3.6 VR6
 

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Not sure if the passat b6 uses the same the 3.0l as the a4 b6 (from what I have learned here the b6 a4 is a lot closer to the b5.5 passat) so the same hole may exist to sneak a peak there too.
The Audi 3.0 V6 is generally similar to the 2.8, but has a number of differences, besides displacement. For example, no front coils/plug wires: it has 1.8T type coils. The thermostat is installed vertically under the intake manifold, not on the front of the block. And the block is Aluminum, not cast Iron. Also, there are no cam chains or tensioners, the four cams are driven by individually-adjustable hydraulic units.
 

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I own a 2003 GLX 4Motion wagon, which has the ATQ 6 cylinder motor. Maybe the same as you? Unclear from the thread.
Anyway, for what it's worth, I once had a very steady drip from my water pump when I was far, far away from a VW dealer on a Friday afternoon when we were heading home from vacation. I was concerned. So, I used Barr's stop leak in the system. Fixed it right up and got us home, after which I went to my VW mechanic and had him change the coolant. There are risks with these kinds of products, the biggest one being that you might plug your heater core. My core is plugged, but I can't say it was related to this (the heat was marginal before I did this), but it might be.

But, if you live in an area where you don't have meaningful winter weather and you plan on not keeping the car forever, then one of these stop leak products might work for you. Good luck.
 

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I don't get it. How do you plug the heater core?
The 'stop leak' is designed to plug small holes, which is basically the entire makeup of the heater core. My first 1.8t had a clogged heater core, a clogged radiator and a bottle of stop leak in it when I bought it. Little did I know then....
 

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The 'stop leak' is designed to plug small holes, which is basically the entire makeup of the heater core. My first 1.8t had a clogged heater core, a clogged radiator and a bottle of stop leak in it when I bought it. Little did I know then....
I see. Thus the OP actually meant "clog" instead of "plug".
 

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I don't get it. How do you plug the heater core?
Heater cores and the radiator can easily become 'sludged up' from using coolants that aren't friendly with aluminum. I successfully backwashed my heater core but due to insufficient flushing, the seals in the water pump died requiring me to replace it. Ugh...
 

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I got G12 for $25 (unmixed) from the stealership. I mixed it with distilled water 50/50 and got 2 gallons of coolant thus about $12.50 per gallon of OEM.
This is one of the few things I will buy at the $tealership. Just bought a gallon of G13 at my local dealer, $22, best deal I've ever seen on coolant for the Passat.
 

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$22 is the going rate for G13 on autohausaz.com.

I'd be really reluctant to use any coolant stop-leak, due to the issue of getting it out later.
 

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I'd be really reluctant to use any coolant stop-leak, due to the issue of getting it out later.
But if you're stuck in the middle of nowhere and there is no other alternative, it's the only rescue.
 
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