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In a word, or accronym, its the RPMs. When you can spin an engine to 7500+ RPMS (not sure of the actual redline) it makes more power. Look at the S2000, 1.8L but 8000 RPM - 200 normally aspirated HP. Same story with the F1 racing engines, only even more displacement, RPMs and more power.
 

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It's a 3.2L with 330hp. What you should be asking is what makes the Honda S2000 I4 so powerful ;) Or 600cc motorcycle engines with 120+hp.

Actually, what has allowed this type of engine to be accepted in the mainstream is variable valve timing and lift. Big horsepower per liter numbers are nothing new - the Porsche 1973 911 RSR had 280hp from 2.8L, but NO bottom end at all (and not in the way we talk about Hondas). Variable valve technologies have allowed engines to support the flow necessary to make power at high RPM without being completely gutless down low. High RPM requires a strong valve train and lighter internal components for acceptable reliability. It's not a very complicated formula.
 

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air flow=horsepower. high rev ranges that can support the right air flow at all engine speeds will give you the power. or something like that.
 

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Would you say the 1.8t revs pretty high then? It definitely seems rev happier than any other car I've driven (not that I've driven many...)

-Wapptor
 

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Wapptor said:
Would you say the 1.8t revs pretty high then? It definitely seems rev happier than any other car I've driven (not that I've driven many...)

-Wapptor
Most turbocharged cars have very nonlinear throttle response, thus exacerbating the sensation that the car is rev happy. I dont think the 1.8t motor is any more rev happy than a 4g63 or vq30dett.
 

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Close manufacturing tolerances is essential for good engine balance and a reliable high-revving car. Needless to say, due to cost, its not too practical. The B18c5 of the Integra Type R (8400-ish rpm redline domestically, 8900 rpm in Japan) was handmade for this reason.
 

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Ahhh.. I can just see the old Japanese engineer widdling away on a block of aluminum. I've always assumed when they talk about those engines being hand made, it just means picking balanced sets of parts out of the bin. I.e., run 2000 con rods through the mill and pick four that are very close in weight for every engine. But correct me if I'm wrong.

The 1.8T, rev happy? Yea, not that you've driven many indeed ;)
 

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So basically these high HP engines in sports cars (usually the more expensive types) are built with the pistons, rods, valves, etc. that allow them to go to high RPM's and higher RPMS means more horsepower. :thumbup:

Add one thing to the list of things I learned from Mac
 

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lol. Yes Mac, those little Japanese men do work quite diligently. :) Seriously though, from what I've heard, in addition to piecing together balanced parts, they're manually ported and polished and possibly a 3 angle valvejob. Nothing out of the ordinary for what most do for an aftermarket valvetrain, but on a largescale effort, its one of the few.
 

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Well it never seems to be straining is maybe what I'm saying. Step on the throttle and the revs shoot up nice and fast and easy. My mom's minivan, my dad's X5 3.0i and even a mustang V6 I drove exhibited MUCH different behavior (seems almost like they were straining more)

-Wapptor
 

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Wapptor said:
Well it never seems to be straining is maybe what I'm saying. Step on the throttle and the revs shoot up nice and fast and easy. My mom's minivan, my dad's X5 3.0i and even a mustang V6 I drove exhibited MUCH different behavior (seems almost like they were straining more)

-Wapptor
Go drive an old Del Sol VTEC 1.6 or Integra GS R 1.8....those rev!

No the 1.8T is not a good high RPM engine at all, it's very smooth, but I think the HP peak is actually at 5600 or so (??). It's a GREAT engine, but not rev happy.

The other cars you drove have similar powerbands as the 1.8T.
 

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Go drive an old Del Sol VTEC 1.6 or Integra GS R 1.8....those rev!
My friend is a big Corolla GTS fan and Ive seen some really nice AE86 that spin to ~9k and and are quite quick about getting there too.
 

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Also, the M3 engine's (engine code S54B32 according to this chart [pdf]) compression ratio of 11.5:1 is on the high side for production car gasoline engines. Many of the other normally aspirated engines in that chart with compression ratios greater than 11.0:1 (e.g., Toyota 2ZZ-GE, Porsche's 3.6L in the GT3) also make a lot of power for their size. Of course, a high compression ratio alone doesn't guarantee exceptional power characteristics.
 

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airflow, intake/exhaust/combustion chamber design have a lot to do w/ rpm range, as well...
 
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