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The 2.7T is a mess with the oil and coolant lines to the turbos. The turbos sit behind the head, on top of the trans. There are vacuum, electrical and PCV lines back there too. This is the engine without the PCV and the 2nd is with the manual trans (tip is much larger). The PCV had to be left off until after the install.
View attachment 100270

View attachment 100271
Indeed.

Looks more like a Pratt&Whitney.

Between the W8 and 2.7t which one is easier to pull out of the car?


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Probably the W8 as it would have less connections. The 2.7T has air tubes from the top, down the side to the turbos, then up by the motor mounts to the intercoolers and then up the front of the motor to the intake.
 
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My 1998 GLS failed the test here in Phoenix. First time ever failing with that car.:confused:
They told me the car wasn't ready. Whatever that means. :unsure:
Haven't be been able to get back there to test again. When you're working 6 days a week, it's hard to get stuff done.
I have had this happen to me before on my 03’ passat wagon. My case was due to a recent code clearing event I did and the testing locations like to see 60-100 miles in the car after a code has been cleared. At least that’s what they told me. I drove it the week, went back and was good to go. Good luck. Now I have my 07 passat - that things lit up like a Christmas tree. ABS, airbag, brakes, engine, it’s all on and I just need to take one light at a time with that one. Man I love these wagons 🤪
 

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They wouldn't give you the reason for failing the test? Thats whack. So you're just supposed to guess or do they do something like only give the info to licensed workshops to do the repairs?
I questioned the test from the get go. The guy at the test station had major issues getting the umbilical cord hooked up to the OBDII port on my car. I personally can't get my head wrapped around why plugging in a device is so challenging for those jugheads. Then they told me to leave my car running. That was a new one for me.
Then after about 20 minutes of I don't know what, the testing guy said it didn't pass. His bit of worthy advice, go to the internet and search 'not ready' error for a Volvo. I kid you not! The wife was witness to it all.
I was absolutely furious.
I raced into the front office with flames on my heels where the Supervisor of the testing station is suppose to be, that dumbass was worse than the sausage that couldn't plug my car in to the testing machine.
Now I'm working 70+ hours per week, I don't even have time to fart much less chase down to the testing station that's way out of my way. Meh, one of these days I'll get it done.
 

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Have you been having any electrical problems before testing?
No I have not. Yes, I did have a P0411 about a month ago but I reset that and all was good.
I scanned for codes a few days before I went to the test, again all was good.
I don't know.
 

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Thats gonna be so nice. Mine is 30×60. It has 3 bays and an office. Another huge perk is the oil/water separation tank. Life has been so much easier now since the carport days or before during the Seattle side street days before that to wrench.

Can't wait to see your shop! Which company did you go through?
I went through Metal Depot in Los Cruces, NM.
Scott hooked me up. :p That guy was awesome to deal with.
The building I purchased was a standard package 30' x 40' with 12' walls.
I inquired about a taller wall as I want to have a guest room inside on one of the corners, he upgraded me to a 16' wall for an additional $1200. That was a no brainer. (y) Sign me up.
I purchased the building a couple of days later and lucky for me, the manufacturing facility is here in Phoenix, about 10 miles away from where I work. Couldn't have worked out any better.
 

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Make sure to sand any casting residue. I had a few small areas on mine that I sanded so it would seal better.
 

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Make sure to sand any casting residue. I had a few small areas on mine that I sanded so it would seal better.
Thank you PZ.

That’s exactly what was bothering me. Whether I should sand those spots in the pics.

I am not too familiar with metal sanding. What kind of sanding method did you use?




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I haven't seen these up close before. Wow, that is some really rough casting. The first pic is the one I'd be most concerned with. You can use small file or even a sharp knife tip to gently scrape it flat. If you want the inside ring to be perfectly smooth, run a folded piece of emery paper around it. Just be careful not to take off too much material You don't want to widen or deepen the gap where the o-ring sits.

Or, you could get that piece flat and smear a thin layer of silicone/RTV to fill in the roughness of the casting. Let cure/dry before assembling so that it does not affect the positioning of the o-ring.
 

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Yikes, that's some pretty rough casting. You'll definitely want to do as VAGguy suggests. You're not supposed to use any sealers on O-rings, but this is definitely one of those exceptions to the rule.
Just make sure the contact surface of the o-ring that mates to the back of the head is free of any RTV film.
 

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I am beginning to think I should return this and re-order. :)

I got this from Amazon. Purely made in China.

I have seen one at Ürotuning. I wonder if I should order from them. They might be more careful about those blemishes although theirs too is likely made in China.


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Yikes, that's some pretty rough casting. You'll definitely want to do as VAGguy suggests. You're not supposed to use any sealers on O-rings, but this is definitely one of those exceptions to the rule.
Just make sure the contact surface of the o-ring that mates to the back of the head is free of any RTV film.
Which is why I advised to only use a thin film to smooth out the roughness and to let it dry/cure before putting the o-ring on ;). Gives the o-ring a smoother surface to squish up against when compressed. Oh, I meant in the o-ring groove, not on the whole mating surface.
 

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I used a small screwdriver wrapped in 200 grit sandpaper to start, then went to the metal sanding paper. I don't recall the grit. It was easy to smooth it out. I got mine at UroTuning, it looked much the same.
 

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I used a small screwdriver wrapped in 200 grit sandpaper to start, then went to the metal sanding paper. I don't recall the grit. It was easy to smooth it out. I got mine at UroTuning, it looked much the same.
Great to know urotuning is the same. I will go ahead and sand it.


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Great to know urotuning is the same. I will go ahead and sand it.


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Yeah all the places Ive seen sell these aluminum coolant flange upgrades have had some roughness/burs in the casting. So not sure its a luck of the draw situation. PZ & VAGguy have brought up great advice, the aluminum is super easy to sand the imperfections. Totally worth the money.
 

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First time trying my hand at Wrinkle Painting.



Don't think Im even going to use this valve cover, was more of just a test. I used pretty large coats and then I took a heat gun to it till I got the wrinkle pattern I wanted. You can also go a step further and cure in the oven. I used to be a professional painter (Boeing) so Im usually comfortable with it. But recently Ive been collecting equipment to start powdercoating some small-medium parts at my shop!

I needed to do some boost testing again, but I didnt really feel like going to Home Depot to build a tester like I had previously done. So I actually found one for just under $50 (which isnt much cheaper then building one myself from PVC. This kit worked really well.



 

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Ordered and Got the aluminum flange and temp sensor after I saw wetness in the back of the head on the plastic flange. Let’s see how installation will go.




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You will need a new seal for the flange to metal coolant pipe.
 

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So, I replaced the flange. Still need to put things back together.
All o rings new. But the flange-to-metal pipe oring which I got from the dealer, I had to force in a bit and tighten, whereas the original oring, somewhat square shaped , popped right in when I tested it.
The housing in metal flange is round but the original plastic flange had deeper groove. Still I was able to bolt it. I will see if it leaks.

The plastic flange is 2 years old and looks fine but I think the oring to metal pipe was hardened.

I sanded the flange as much as I could and the surfaces are smooth.

I saw the half moon leaked

minimally so I cleaned the surface and applied silicon. Hope it keeps it dry.





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