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Fixed my 2001 B5.5 Passat Moonroof Drains - The Motion Picture (Director's Edition, extra long)

Pulled the front end of my headliner down (after removing the Jesus Handles, visors, center moonroof control unit and windshield air bag covers) in order to reconnect the moonroof drainage tubes that had worked loose over the last 20 years. The worst part was removing the cover to the visor retaining clips. They are officially "textured" now. BEING CAREFUL, headliner was able to be pulled down slightly at this point, enough for inspection and reaching in. Upon examination, only the passenger side was loose from the moonroof drains, fortunately. Driver side was firmly attached. However, both of the drain points in the door pillar had become loose, so I fought to get my fingers into that #*$^&*ing access port where the grommet exits. Quickly discovered that the hoses are better accessed through the door wiring grommet point right below the comically small drain grommet hole. I'd run weed trimmer line down the drain line from the top while it was loose from the moonroof drain, and that gave me a fish point to grab onto. Exterior nipple sliced off, line run through grommet, clamp fastened on grommet, anchoring hose into drain grommet, all reinstalled. One clamp later, on the moonroof drain end up top, and it is secured. Driver's side was a pain because the hose had no extra length since it was affixed to the moonroof drain still, and I didn't want to yank it free since it seemed happy where it was. Somehow, I'd lost the grommet, so I said to hell with it, and affixed a foot long section of clear tubing halfway up onto the red drain line (i.e., red line was 6" into the clear tubing. Remainder of tubing extended out of the door pillar, and lays mostly flat inside the door to pillar air gap, to drain as the original part was designed to do. I didn't feel the need to put a clamp on it because it was quite a bit of work to get the clear tubing over the red drain line, and it's held quite tightly with friction. If I ever find that grommet, I will modify it for this easy flow configuration. By the way, that red tube had a lot of slimy gunk in it, and I used my weed trimmer line to work it all out and clear. Thankfully, I drive a Passat wagon, so accessing the rear drains won't require removal of the rear bumper, just the wheel well covers so that I can run my trusty weed trimmer line up, and it is my hope that they are relatively clean and it seems they are attached to the moonroof, so not requiring the dropping of the rear of the headliner.

I have to say, there are some good YouTube videos on this subject, and they saved me a lot of guesswork.

Next project: clean the box tape adhesive off of my roof! :ROFLMAO: At least I was smart enough to NOT use duct tape.

Thanks for reading if you made it this far, I wish I'd snapped some photos to use in court against the engineers who decided to make that drain hose bottom end such a pain to access. Cheers!
 

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Fixed my 2001 B5.5 Passat Moonroof Drains - The Motion Picture (Director's Edition, extra long)
***Follow-up to the story
Ok, we just have had several days of rain, with last night being 3 inches of continuous onslaught -- and I see the beautiful sight of water dripping out of the proper spots on the door pillars! No more wet carpet, no sloshing at turns and stop signs! Woohoooo!!
 

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Stupid weather... just when I get the gumption to work on my car, it becomes cold (40s) and rainy. It's enough to make a guy build another garage, this one for cars! :ROFLMAO: (full disclosure, my 1913-built garage is barely deep enough to let a '63 Beetle in and for me to close the overhead door. The wagon doesn't fit.)

So, plan B. Start putting "spring car chores" on the dry erase board.
 

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Don't let them tell you it can't be done without proprietary parts!
I had a plastic nipple break off of a checkvalve, and had to improvise a repair.

WD-40 straw, perfect diameter to fit the broken vacuum part.. idles like glass now. I feel like MacGuyver. :D

(p.s.yes, I did clean out those maple seeds...!)
 

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oil change on my daughter's wagon. I thought I nailed it but then after I came home from recycling the old oil I found a big spot on the garage floor. Must have come from the filter. I used a plastic bag but didn't do it cleanly.

The dipstick is also starting to fall apart. Fortunately, all the pieces fell outside the hole but ugh! is there any dipstick for a B5 that doesn't get brittle over time?
I just changed my oil yesterday (because when it's 85F outside, perfect weather, right?) , and it's been two changes since my dipstick replacement. Still finding little orange bits in the oil that I pour out of the used filter. Oh, before I pull my filter, I stuff an old towel beneath it to catch all the oil that still manages to get past my plastic bag containment field. Much less of a mess. Of course, when carefully pouring used oil from pan to recycling jug, I still managed to make a mess 😆 😆 😆 😆
 

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As an experiment in gambling, I filled my tank with Amoco "regular" gas at 87 octane, as opposed to the usual 93 octane premium. It ran fine. I filled it again, this time with Costco "regular". It's still running fine.

Maybe it's just that summer blend is superior to winter blend. I don't know.

Until I notice some sort of deficiency in performance, I'm going with Regular.

oh, and by the way, my WD-40 straw "improvised vacuum jumper" from earlier posting is still working fine.
 

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I ordered a blower motor resistor for my Passat from Rock Auto, it is a Beck-Arnley. Watched the obligatory YouTube installation videos, and hey, guess what? It wasn't as easy to R/R as the videos showed. Why not? Previous owner or mechanic had done some sketchy reassembly of the duct work. I didn't mind figuring it out, but the fact that the resistor had a 5.5mm headed screw holding it in, rather than 6mm, that kind of annoyed me. The 1" decking screw was a cute touch, attaching the blower to the upper half of the ducting in lieu of the actual screw that was supposed to hold it in place (tab on blower motor was broken off, so they just tacked it on directly). Anyway, I inspected the blower motor while I had everything open, and it was seemingly in good shape. Spun freely as is should, no noise or grinding. So, I installed the new resistor, reinstalled blower motor, then TESTED before reinstalling glove box. Worked great once I re-plugged in the blower motor 😆 😆 derp.. All buttoned up, and cleaned out the glove box too. Aside from the sketchy previous work and the annoying mosquitoes, not a hard job. Now I can use my AC on any speed without it cutting out after a couple of minutes.

I figure I saved myself $100 in labor from a shop, so I'll pencil that on over to my "1963 Beetle account" towards the new interior panels I have ordered that are still on backorder.

Note to anyone doing this- remember that you're working with old plastic, and it tends to be fragile sometimes. Take your time, don't force it.
 

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Any shop up here would easily go 1.5 or 2 hours for that… So, you would have saved at least $150 (everything up here is $100/hr)
Wow-- I was piddling around, taking my time, and did it in under an hour. I guess I need to up my estimated time to maintain my reputation as "a miracle worker" :ROFLMAO: Seriously, though- if everything had gone perfectly right, with all the proper fasteners in the right places...that is a half-hour job at most. However, that being said, I shall allocate $150 to my Herbie slush fund.
 

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Did you see my ‘light sanding’ of my disk brake dust shield I got from @Tortelious? Yes, this baby will be rust free. But I’m not satisfied with the brand of high heat black gloss paint I used: the finish is rapidly deteriorating. What is a good primer and paint brand to use that will survive a decent amount of time?

The poly mounts - I’ve heard of that and am avoiding those. Looking at Febi.
I wonder how Rust Bullet would hold up? It takes a lot of physical abuse well, used to undercoat aircooled VW pans.
 
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Put in the new TCU, good as new. Now for the water ingress...

Question: Does the sunroof tube have to run to the nipple? I couldn't fish the end out and I don't have a double square to remove the door to get at it. As far as I can tell it just runs down the A pillar and into a crossmember and out the bottom but I'm not 100%.

Tracking the water leaks on these cars is a nightmare and the carpets seem to hold a ridiculous amount of water.
I'm going to make a big assumption and guess that your car is a B5.5 like mine. That being said,

To fish the end out of that prohibitively small space and not have to remove your door, run a length ( I just fed it right off the spool) of thick weedtrimmer line down from the roof drain inlet, you'll see it inside the grommet hole after it has come through the drain hose. You can then grab the trimmer line-might have to use something to hook it and then guide the bottom of the drain hose out of the grommet hole. There's not a lot of excess, and you don't want to pull on the drain hose as you might pull it free of the roof drain up top (ask me how I know this is possible :rolleyes:) In my particular case, I'd misplaced my grommet somehow, so I simply obtained a piece of clear vinyl tubing from Lowe's and used it as a sleeve to fit over the drain hose, sliding it about 6 inches up the drain hose, adding enough length to extend well out of the pillar grommet hole. It's worked like a charm ever since. When I eventually find the grommet piece, I'll cut that dirt-catcher tip off of it, and reinstall it properly. Utilizing the trimmer line as a guide (anchored up top to keep it taut), you can feed the grommet back into place on the drain tube, making sure it's well seated. Then, put the grommet gently back into its hole. Of course, pour a couple of ounces of water down the drain up top, to verify that it's properly coming out the grommet end because, well... Murphy's Law.

long story short, yes, you need to either reconnect the line to the drain nipple, or otherwise route the flow out of the body of the A pillar.
 

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Yes, it's a 5.5.

I tried a ss shifter cable and a length of stiff plastic tubing, basically hollow trimmer wire but a little stiffer with no success. I can only get two fingers in the hole and try to grab at it like a crab. I think the way it's routed in the A pillar it's closer to the body and out of my reach. And because the silicone tubing is still pliable it's pointing straight down.

So frustrating. I just want to cross all of the potential water leak problems off the list. It seems to have had all of the recalls performed; the nipplectomy, the cabin filter seal, the drain plus in the firewall. But water still seems to be getting in, the carpets are wet and there's no point drying them until the leaks are taken care of.
Is your carpet wet on both sides?
Have you determined that water is not coming in via the door itself? That happens when the door drains are blocked.
Back to the grommet port area, Maybe make a coat hanger wire hook or loop to capture the line after it has exited the end of the tube? Solid .95 trimmer line is my recommendation. You can feed an excess amount of it down into the body, and it will eventually curl up to where you can grab it with your hook.
Or, you could go full drastic and block the drain hole up in the moon roof gutter that seems to be the source of the leakage. You'll still have three other drains assuming they are all flowing freely out of the car. I'd use something like rubber cement, make it into a small tacky ball first, then push it into the drain hole. It will be easy to remove since it's just a stopper, when you get around to revisiting the drain issue.

One last thought- both drains in the battery section are free of debris, correct?
 

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I have to check but I'm pretty sure it is. The CCM is working so I'm hopeful.

. I cleaned out the battery compartment and it's draining well. But just 1 drain, I'm not sure where the second one is?
There is the one beneath the battery, (center) and then one over towards the steering column area, if I recall, it's beneath some fuse module boxes. You can reach your hand in there, run it flat along the bottom of the area. I removed both of my drain plugs in that trough, I know that defeats fine German engineering, but it keeps any water flowing OUT of that area.
 
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Been a busy week here at the Shady Rust Volksfarm... I've replaced the Air blower motor (did the resistor previously, then the blower started screaming at me) and the main serpentine belt. That was a surprise repair, as I found a crack on the surface of it. Well, I thought it was only on the surface, until I saw light shining through it... Knowing that didn't bode well, I picked up a new belt and did the R/R. Even just using ramps, it was not too horrible removing it and routing the new one up, in, and around in tight quarters, other than dealing with the overlaying AC compressor belt.

This ate up the majority of time spent on the project. That was a somnavabeetch to get off, and pretty much impossible to get back on, as it was getting dark and I was pressed for time. I replaced that last year, and recall it was a bit of hell. Stupid tensioner top bolt is impossible to see, so it's a Braille job to get the Allen wrench into it to loosen it up (note: never remove this bolt unless you absolutely have to, as replacing it is an exercise in pain). I'll give re-installing that belt another go tonight, when I have adequate daylight and the urge to get eaten alive by late season mosquitoes. Yes, I'll spray myself down with my Deet spray first, this time.

Here's a fancy picture of the failing belt, I've never seen one split like this.
 
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