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Discussion Starter #1
im currently running 10000k and its gotten to be a bit too blue for me...i have the HELLA projectors for my B5 passat and i realized i want to match it as close as possible to the Bi-xenon headlights that come from europe. I heard those are 5300k, so if i get 5300k bulbs would that look just like the B5 passats with the euro Bi-xenon headlight setup?

On a side note, i also really like the Vw touareg xenons...does anyone know what temperature rating those are?
 

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Out of the two 5300k will look more stock. Most cars with factory equipped HIDs come with 4300k. Personally, I have 5000k bulbs, and the light is pure white.
 

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10000K wow. I don't believe that light output is any better than stock.
 

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I heard those are 5300k, so if i get 5300k bulbs would that look just like the B5 passats with the euro Bi-xenon headlight setup?
Yep. They should look somewhat similar but you have to remember that the european passats have xenon projector lenses. So if you hella's are the halogen projectors and not the xenons, the light pattern won't be "as" crisp.

On a side note, i also really like the Vw touareg xenons...does anyone know what temperature rating those are?
I think they are 5300k. I'm not sure though. I know the B5 audi's are 4300K, so maybe the touareg is the same. Sorry I can't help :(
 

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im currently running 10000k and its gotten to be a bit too blue for me...i have the HELLA projectors for my B5 passat and i realized i want to match it as close as possible to the Bi-xenon headlights that come from europe. I heard those are 5300k, so if i get 5300k bulbs would that look just like the B5 passats with the euro Bi-xenon headlight setup?

On a side note, i also really like the Vw touareg xenons...does anyone know what temperature rating those are?
omgwtfbbqdiaf.

10000K? Do you have any idea how worthless that light is for seeing? The human eye responds to YELLOW light the best. Why? Well, take a look at THE SUN sometime and it might begin to make sense. The only things blue light is good for are color differentiation and impressing dumbass ricers.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don't worry hes making a change for the better. He is coming to the "light" side...ha-ha-ha.
yes indeed....i dont know what i was thinking before...having said that, im leaning a bit more toward the 5300k because like i said i really like the B5 passay euro setup and especially the touareg
 

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These are my HIDs i have 6000k i used to have 8000k but it was too blue. I like 6000k but if i get more i will get in the 5k range because my GF has them in her lexus and her lights are a bit brighter than mine.




 

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Discussion Starter #11
the 5000k looks like just what i want...thats as close to oem as it might get on US DOT headlights....6k looks good also but a little on the baby blue side for me....

thanks :thumbup:

if any1 got more pics, plz post
 

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omgwtfbbqdiaf.

10000K? Do you have any idea how worthless that light is for seeing? The human eye responds to YELLOW light the best. Why? Well, take a look at THE SUN sometime and it might begin to make sense. The only things blue light is good for are color differentiation and impressing dumbass ricers.
Only thing about that is that the sun actually puts out a light color around
5-6k.

color Temperature refers to the quality of light emanating from the artificial light source. (Represented by by the number of degrees Kelvin based on the Kelvin color temperature scale.) The color temperature of outside light varies from 5000K to 6000K depending on the time of day, weather, season and latitude. The higher the color of a fluorescent lamp, the bluer (cooler) the appearance. The lower the color temperature the redder (warmer) it's appearance.

Stars have different colors according to their surface temperatures, not the color of the light they put out.
Cooler stars are red to orange; hotter stars are blue to white.
The Sun's surface temp is 5770 deg. Kelvin which is why it's its color.
 

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Daylight Sources Color Temperature
(K)
Skylight 12000 to 18000
Overcast Sky 7000
Noon Sun/Clear Summer Sky 5000 to 7000
Noon Sun/Clear Winter Sky 5500 to 6000
Photographic Daylight 5500
Noon Sunlight
(Date Dependent) 4900 to 5800
Average Noon Sunlight
(Northern Hemisphere) 5400
Sunlight at 30-Degree Altitude 4500
Sunlight at 20-Degree Altitude 4000
Sunlight at 10-Degree Altitude 3500
Sunrise and Sunset 3000
Artificial Sources Color Temperature
(K)
White LED 6500 to 9500
Electronic Flash 5500 to 6500
Xenon Burner 6000
White Flame Carbon Arc 5000
Warm White Fluorescent Tubes 4000
Aluminum-Filled Flash Bulbs
(M2, 5, & 25) 3800
500-Watt 3400 K Photoflood 3400
12 Volt/100 Watt
Tungsten-Halogen @ 9 Volts 3200
12 Volt/50 Watt
Tungsten-Halogen @ 9 Volts 3200
100-Watt Household Lamp 2900
40-Watt Household Lamp 2650
Gaslight 2000 to 2200
Candlelight
(British Standard) 2900
 

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omgwtfbbqdiaf.

10000K? Do you have any idea how worthless that light is for seeing? The human eye responds to YELLOW light the best. Why? Well, take a look at THE SUN sometime and it might begin to make sense. The only things blue light is good for are color differentiation and impressing dumbass ricers.

OK...time for a science lesson..lol.

Actually the light from the sun is primarily white. Hitting the earth's atmosphere causes much of the white to be dispersed into its full spectrum, causing the yellow and reds to filter through more easily (due to longer wave lengths), the blues etc are of shorter wavelengths and thus Rayleigh scattering (gas molecules absorb the blue rays and scatter them) causes those shorter wavelengthed spectrums to make the sky to appear blue and not reach us in more copious amounts.

Just because the reds and yellows get through more easily does not mean we see better in yellow light. Outside of the earth's atmosphere the sun would appear almost white (colours which make up white light consist of orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, and red).

Ever looked at a picture of the sun via a camera? Does it look yellow or more white to you? ;)

There are four kinds of light-sensitive receptors are found in the retina and they all equally allow us to see the visible light spectrum:

1. rods

Then there are three kinds of cones, each "tuned" to absorb light from a portion of the spectrum of visible light

2. cones that absorb long-wavelength light (red)
3. cones that absorb middle-wavelength light (green)
4. cones that absorb short-wavelength light (blue)

Green actually makes up the largest nm potion of the visible colour spectrum and not yellow.

This now concludes our Science Break. And now for something completely different.

 

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I have 10000K on my passat but they are 55W, they're not as blue as 35W, they're like 8000K but two times brighter. Looks very nice and it's much brighter than 4500K Audi.
 

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OK...time for a science lesson..lol.
Okay punk, let's go.
Actually the light from the sun is primarily white. Hitting the earth's atmosphere causes much of the white to be dispersed into its full spectrum, causing the yellow and reds to filter through more easily (due to longer wave lengths), the blues etc are of shorter wavelengths and thus Rayleigh scattering (gas molecules absorb the blue rays and scatter them) causes those shorter wavelengthed spectrums to make the sky to appear blue and not reach us in more copious amounts.
Actually the light from the sun is yellow. It APPEARS to be white when viewed from high altitudes because the atmosphere is too thin to diffuse the light and the light overwhelms ALL of your retinal cone cells, so that your eyes can no longer percieve an accurate color balance. When properly dimmed, the sun is very distinctly yellow in color.
Just because the reds and yellows get through more easily does not mean we see better in yellow light. Outside of the earth's atmosphere the sun would appear almost white (colours which make up white light consist of orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, and red).
I hope you realize just how ridiculous this sounds. Our eyes evolved to operate in sunlight, not in some abstract definition of what "white light" actually is. As such, one might (if one took the time to think about it) realize that the human eye is probably a little biased to see the color of direct sunlight as being "balanced" and "white".

Take a quick trip to Wikipedia, if nothing else, (here's a head start)and take a look at the human eye's responsiveness to various light frequencies. The red and green cone cells respond most strongly to light frequencies centered around 550 nanometers, which on the CIE 1931 color space is a very light yellow color on the edge of the green portion of the spectrum. (Unfortunately, computer screens are only capable of reproducing three colors of light and therefore cannot render the full color spectrum accurately, so that spot on the the CIE 1931 color space APPEARS to be solidly in green territory on a computer screen. This is an unfortunate deficiency given the topic of discussion and the medium used to convey it.)

Ever looked at a picture of the sun via a camera? Does it look yellow or more white to you? ;)
Hey look, not one but TWO logical fallacies in this bit right here.

1. Cameras are designed by humans, and humans designed cameras to reproduce colors accurately compared to what the human eye percieves when directly viewing the subject of a photograph. The bias of the human eye is therefore a consideration that cannot be dismissed.

2. Cameras are just as easily overloaded by direct sunlight as human eyes are , and therefore are just as incapable of reflecting the color temperature of direct sunlight as the human eye is.

There are four kinds of light-sensitive receptors are found in the retina and they all equally allow us to see the visible light spectrum:

1. rods

Then there are three kinds of cones, each "tuned" to absorb light from a portion of the spectrum of visible light

2. cones that absorb long-wavelength light (red)
3. cones that absorb middle-wavelength light (green)
4. cones that absorb short-wavelength light (blue)

Green actually makes up the largest nm potion of the visible colour spectrum and not yellow.
Okay, I'll give you a little credit; you're not entirely full of shit. You do at least know what kinds of photoreceptors the human retina has. However, it's pretty clear that you haven't actually done any research into their responsiveness to colors of light. Did you know, for example, that the peak color responsiveness for red and green "cones" are within 30 nanometers of each other (565/535), whereas blue "cones'" peak responsiveness is almost four times as far away (420nm)? No, you didn't. Let us consider the ramifications of this:

1. 2/3 of the bright-light photoreceptors in your eyes are targeted squarely at the perception of light-yellow light, meaning that the majority of your eyes' ability to percieve detail depends on the presence of light-yellow light.

2. The remaining 1/3 of the bright-light photoreceptors in your eyes act as a counterbalance to this strong yellow color bias.

Hmm. That seems to support my prior assertion that yellow light is best for seeing, and blue light is only useful for percieving color balance (i.e. is ALL of the light yellow, or not?).

You also failed to mention that rod cells continuously produce a chemical called rhodopsin, which causes them to be about 10x more sensitive to light than cone cells. Due to rhodopsin's tendency to break down almost instantly in turquoise light, rod cells are rendered effectively useless in the daytime (hence why we even need separate blue "cones" to begin with). This has two effects on night-vision:

1. The human eye, treated as a whole instead of as a conglomeration of different types of photoreceptors, is about 10x more sensitive to turquoise light at night than during the day -- this is the cause of the pain associated with oncoming HID lamps that I have mentioned time and time again. (take the time to note the color of those 8000K HID bulbs you wet your pants over, would you please?)

2. The human eye's sensitivity to yellow light is not dependent on the presence of a highly-unstable chemical, whereas its sensitivity to blue light (which is what most nighttime light is) is very much dependent on the presence of that chemical. This is why red lights don't damage night vision and white lights do.

Rhodopsin takes about 30 minutes to replenish itself, but it degrades almost instantly, meaning that every time someone gets hit with the bright-blue aura surrounding an HID beam, they lose a bit of their night vision that they probably won't get back until they've already arrived at their destination and don't NEED to be able to see at night anymore.

I've done my research and you haven't. So, I'll say it yet again:

HIGH-TEMPERATURE HID BULBS ARE SHIT. STOP FUCKING USING THEM. IT'S NOT EASIER FOR YOU TO SEE WITH THEM, AND THEY MAKE IT HARDER FOR OTHER DRIVERS TO SEE. STOP BEING SELF-CENTERED ASSHOLES.

That is all.
 
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