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Discussion Starter #1
While flushing out my heater core and radiator yesterday, I noticed a new bunch of small black particles floating around in the coolant. It's not the typical brown flaky material that comes out of the heater core. I traced it to the inner lining of the upper radiator hose that's slowly deteriorating. I could rub pieces of it off with my finger.

Anyways, how are you supposed to remove the upper radiator hose with the "special VW fitting" pictured below? I've pulled up the metal retaining spring but it won't budge. I really haven't trued to muscle it out yet because I don't want to break anything since the radiator appears to be made out of the same plastic as well. I though about carefully cutting it off, but there's got to be an easier way.

 

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It's just stuck in there. Keep working it, it will come out. Don't try to rotate, there are two tabs that prevent that and if you try you might break the connection at the radiator. Just pull.
 

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What he said...just pull and maybe rock it a little bit. I think removing the lower radiator hose may have been the most frustrating part of my first timing belt job. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, I will try a little harder once my replacement hose gets here. I didn't want to break something and be stuck without a car for a few days while I wait for a part.
 

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Generic advice for stubborn fittings, especially plastic or rubber ones: If it's hard to get off, and you're thinking of replacing it anyway, leave it alone until you have the new part in hand. Examining the new one may give insights on removal, and you won't immobilize the car if you break the old one.
 

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Did you manage? I used one of these:

pipewrench.jpg

I don't think I've ever exerted that much force at something, but anyway, the fittings were miraculously unharmed. Good news is, nowadays they come off with just a little jerk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Did you manage? I used one of these:

I don't think I've ever exerted that much force at something, but anyway, the fittings were miraculously unharmed. Good news is, nowadays they come off with just a little jerk.
How did you manage to get it off with the pipe wrench? There are tabs on the top and bottom that prevent the hose from turning. Unless your Norwegian passat has a different type of radiator hose.

I haven't tried again yet. The replacement hose just got there yesterday. I will try again this weekend. I may just cut (carefully) a little (not deep) slice into the hose to make sure I don't damage anything by snatching it off.
 

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I pared down a small piece of softer wood, and inserted it in the smallish hole from the front, and then hit it with a deadblow hammer. pop, comes right off, and no damage.
 

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How did you manage to get it off with the pipe wrench? There are tabs on the top and bottom that prevent the hose from turning. Unless your Norwegian passat has a different type of radiator hose.

I haven't tried again yet. The replacement hose just got there yesterday. I will try again this weekend. I may just cut (carefully) a little (not deep) slice into the hose to make sure I don't damage anything by snatching it off.
I didn't turn the hose, just clamped the wrench around the fitting, real tight, then wedged the wrench against some part of the car that felt sturdy and went for it. It could of course be that my hoses are different than others - where they attach to the radiator they have plastic fittings that come with a push on clip. I can't really imagine how you'd cut this fitting, unless you're also prepared to do damage to the fitting on the radiator that sticks into it...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I can't really imagine how you'd cut this fitting, unless you're also prepared to do damage to the fitting on the radiator that sticks into it...
My plan was to carefully try to cut almost all the way through the radiator hose portion of the fitting and use a screwdriver to split the two halves apart. I didn't need to resort to that, though, as I managed to snatch it off with no problems. It was almost as much of a pain to get it back on, but the job is complete.
 

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I got the Upper Radiator hose of but now the new hose will not stay on. How do I get the new hose to stay on ? 2004 VW passat 1.8T
 

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Sometimes a rubber mallet with a blunt edged pry bar will persuade it.
 

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When re-installing the hoses, lubrication on the radiator connection and the inside the hose connection is an absolute must.
Rub coolant around the radiator connection and inside the hose connection, especially on the O-ring. If that doesn't work a small amount of plumbers grease on the inside of the hose connection and O-ring works very well.
Plumbers grease will let the hose connection slide right on with a fraction of the effort.
Listen for the click when putting the radiator hose. That's the confirmation that it seated on the radiator all the way.


Available at your favorite hardware supply store.

102086
 

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Oh I forgot to mention, the radiator hose connection has a notch in it. The radiator connector has a tab on it.
These two things MUST line up before anything will go together.
 
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I used undiluted coolant to lube the parts I put in. It works, but not as well as plumbers grease.
 
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