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Discussion Starter #1
I have a link: http://home.comcast.net/~hhong4/tools.htm

And in there is this line:

" What I would look for is how well they chrome their ratchets, sockets and boxend/open end wrenches (to prevent rust and for ease of cleaning off oil and grease), "

Now it's come to my attention this a non-sensical statement that apparently should be removed. Perhaps. I never claimed to be a "tool" expert but did give my 20 years worth of working with the specific Craftsman tools to give my "opinion" but it seems some might take it as strong advise. I guess I should of put in a disclaimer. :( my bad.

But what do some of you that really are "tool" people (work for a tool company specifically) say about this. I really would like to be a bit more accurate but quite frankly 1) It's my site and it's a free country (I still believe the server is in the USA) and 2) It is first and foremost my opinion based on MY experience. I could say stuff about Matco and Snap-On seeing that's the ONLY tools my brother inlaw has and he IS a professional mechanic, so peraps there's logic in what was told to me.

If there is a specific steel or alloy that is used by the other good companies as opposed to what Husky/Craftsman use and I have more info as to why they use that metal, then perhaps I'll simply remove or reword the line. (i.e. you don't need to chrome the Snap on tools because they are rust resistant with "x" metal used in the forging.

But the person did make sense in the fact these are "mass-machined" tools for the masses. No mistaking that. It's why you pay the premiums you do for a Snap=On of Matco, or whatever brand the pro's do use. But I'm not a pro and I am definetly with the masses that are DIY types. We just don't always have the money to buy the best. My bad????
 

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why someone focused on your tools page as opposed to putting thought into the instructions and following them is beyond me.

I love craftsman because it's way too ez to exchange a socket for a new one if it got warped or breaks.

I know Craftsman isn't the BEST out there, but they are pretty darn good when it comes to knowing there's a sears around a lot of corners.

Free country... Leave your statement as is.
 

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i really enjoyed the site bud, nice write ups :thumbup:i actually use tools called Mastercraft that is sold from the Canadian Tire stores, they are of the same quality and price as the craftmen stuff(which i have alot of also) and they are good tools to buy with the easy to echange warranty :)
 

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Lisa Simpson
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Herman, coming from the manufacturing side of things, the condition of the chrome plate is a very good indicator of manufacturing process control. To obtain a good quality plate, the forging lubricant must be completely removed, the tool must go through an extensive prep process, and then the chrome bath must also have good control. In a production environment, these processes are not always easy to control and it amounts to attention to detail.

So, yes, chrome plate quality is a good stab at general tool quality.

Since I know where all the sockets, etc., come from, I see no value in Snap-On and Matco. Craftsman is not the best out there, but Sears is there and easy to deal with. The tools are good to very good quality. That is enough for us. We are not working on Garlitz' top fuel cars here. :)

The cost/benefit ratio is very important.
 

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I'd leave it as is too. Another vote for Craftsman hand tools (not power tools!) for ease of exchange and lifetime warranty. I can always find a Sears but finding the Snap-On guy is a different story.
 

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atomicalex said:
Herman, coming from the manufacturing side of things, the condition of the chrome plate is a very good indicator of manufacturing process control. To obtain a good quality plate, the forging lubricant must be completely removed, the tool must go through an extensive prep process, and then the chrome bath must also have good control. In a production environment, these processes are not always easy to control and it amounts to attention to detail.

So, yes, chrome plate quality is a good stab at general tool quality.

Since I know where all the sockets, etc., come from, I see no value in Snap-On and Matco. Craftsman is not the best out there, but Sears is there and easy to deal with. The tools are good to very good quality. That is enough for us. We are not working on Garlitz' top fuel cars here. :)

The cost/benefit ratio is very important.
I agree with Alex with the exception that I ALWAYS have with her-she focuses on the metals and country of origin only to COMPLETELY IGNORE the feel and function of each individual tool. Just like a scientist! She should work for VW.

"There is a problem with this part-it fails prematurely, over and over again."

"There is no problem-it was made of fine materials."

Five years later:

"We are being sued by people who had that part fail prematurely."

"There is no problem-it was made of fine materials. But, here is this repair kit we designed."

Subjective versus objective, I know I know.

Craftsman could constructed of the finest, best quality tool metal on Earth, but if they keep the same shape they have today I'll NEVER buy or use them because they are fat clunky misshapen hunks of shit.
 

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Lisa Simpson
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I quote myself:
atomicalex said:
The cost/benefit ratio is very important.
TBH, my cheapo Buffalo Forge Chinese socket set won't give up. Very high high high ROI there. :)

Sharky, I just had to replace a set of needlenose pliers for doing electrical work. After looking at about 20 pair in 3 shops, I bought a Companion pair for $5.99. They were forged well, cut and ground neatly, and fit my hand. The Kleins hanging next to them were also nice, but not quite as perfect for my needs as the cheapie ones. I couldn't find a reason to spend $25 when the $6 ones were as good or better for me. Maybe the Kleins are a higher quality tool, but I am not going to notice it when I am working at home.

I think that you are expecting us DIYers to need the quality you need and that is generally not the case. We need good to very good, but not perfect.

Ask me about hammers. Money is not an object there. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks all. I guess people are at least cognitize (sp) to the subject matter in the light that I presented it in.

It was just THAT one line that got this guy to respond to me; he did say he owns Craftsman tools because of "ergonomics".... go figure. I've felt Snap-On's and damn, they really are nice. So as usual, it comes down to individual preferences. For the money, and if you get the "rounded" handled Craftsman hand tools, they are a good value

oh, and the shiny chrome DOES have lot's of bling-bling when I open my rollaway!!! :lol:

I was telling schmove that if I were a pro-mechanic, I suppose I would go with Snap-On or Matco simply because they deliver the tools to you and any mechanic will tell you, their "livelyhood" depends upon tools that are least likely to break and if they do, can be delivered to them; they simply can't go to Sears and get a new socket when they've got about 50 cars lines up at the Mercedes dealership!!!

But again, my tools failures will not leave me in the unemployement line. I actually try to get two of every kind of socket as a backup; since I can have both 12pt and 6pt, I try to get both in the same size. It's has helped me circumvent stopping my work to go to Sears. In some cases, I have 3 of the same size because I also have the impact sockets too.

Anyhow, thanks again.
 

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I think it all depends on what tools we are talking about. Clearly some brands have better wrenches and some brands have better pliers, etc.

For example I bought a set of Husky Allen sockets. The 6mm bit lasted for one job before the corners got rounded. I replaced it with Craftsman, and I've done the same job 6 or 7 times with that 6mm and it looks brand new.

Also I have a lovely pair of Snap-on long needle nose pliers. They are rusted to shit and the only reason I keep them is because it says snap-on. The $8 pair I got at Harbor Freight is routinely used in my saltwater fish tank and hasn't rusted yet. :suspicio:

Honestly I think it all comes down to how easy it is to exchange. Also consider the fact that using the RIGHT tool for the job is everything. If you buy snapon and can't afford the 12 point and 6 point sockets of everything you are doing yourself a dis-service.
 

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Herman, I think your statement makes sense in the manner that it is presented. it's fine!

As tools, I have quite the assortment of stuff. In my Snap-On top box I have a whole slue of different manufactures of tools: Snap-On, Blue-Point (Snap-On's lower end stuff, the finish isn't the same quality), Craftsman, Husky, Master Mechanic, Klien, SK and Cresent. All these different tools have many different uses. The Wrenches are all great quaility units and I haven't had a need to replace the lot with only the Snap-On brand name. For me (an above average car tinkerer) they all do the job intended to do. I love my Snap-On wrenches, screw drivers and sockets though, very nice finish and light to hold, not clumsy at all! I recently had my Snap-On 3/8" driver totally reworked and it cost me nothing. Lifetime warrenty on those! That driver is about 12 years old. And my Snap-On 3/8" torque wrench is the bomb. I was recently offered $250 for it. :shock: And it's about 13 years old! The Craftsman sockets are very nice and the warrenty is second to none! Klien makes some of the best pliers available. Always a nice set to use. Thanks dad! :thumbup:

I could go on and on. I like all my tools and they deffinantly make the jobs I do on my cars easy when I have them. My most recent addition is the Craftsman lower, rolling box. Now my Snap-On box has a mate and doesn't sit on the floor. But now I have to buy more tools to fill those drawers!! :shock: :roll: It never ends... :weirdo:
 

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Herman, just invite the problem rouser to your garage and then whip him couple of times upside his head with one of your shiny wrenches. Then demonstrate to him how easily the wrench is washable and that it does not rust when you washed the blood off. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Boris said:
Herman, just invite the problem rouser to your garage and then whip him couple of times upside his head with one of your shiny wrenches. Then demonstrate to him how easily the wrench is washable and that it does not rust when you washed the blood off. :lol:
Heh, I'll pass on that. But thanks anyway. :) I'm not mad or pissed or anything, just caught me by surprise when I first read it.

LIV4SPD and Chas make a good point. Not every tool has to come from 1 mfg.; I have a varied number of tools myself (Impact is CP, impact socket from Husky, 1/4" ratchet is an old S&K from the 70's, but I'd say a good 90% of all my hand tools are Craftsman due to the lifetime warranty (used 4 times in about 30 years). But the other 10% work equally as well.
 
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