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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
... I went to rotate and balance my tires last Saturday and i was proposed to sipe my tires. I am thinking on doing it. the cost is minimal ($11 a tire) and it is suppose to make a big difference on wet and on the life of the tire.

1) Anyone had it done and what do you think of it?

2) Any negative feedback on it?


I am sure most of you know what it is, but for the ones that are not familiar with it, here is a link to check it out . http://www.americastire.com/dtc/brochure/tire/tireSiping.jsp

Thanks for any input :wink:
 

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I can't see how this would improve things.

Tire companies have large amounts of money their research budgets.
Tire shops have large amounts of nothing in their research budgets.

If shrinking the size of the treadblock with ordered (or otherwise) cuts then, well, I'd think they'd have done it.

Actually, I'd be interested in hearing your skidpad results before and after siping.
 

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Its not done simply because tires with large treadblocks weren't originally meant for snow applications. It does work to some degree, but you're adding a lot of tread squirm on your tires by sectioning your treadblocks. Its a tradeoff which some might be willing to take, but why not just get the right tires to begin with? :p
 

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stealthx32 said:
tires with large treadblocks weren't originally meant for snow applications....you're adding a lot of tread squirm on your tires by sectioning your treadblocks. ....why not just get the right tires to begin with?
I agree 100%. More squirm = more heat. More squirm = less stable tracking at high speeds. More squirm = less responsive steering inputs and feedback. All these things are not good in my book. And lots of edges = lots of noise.

And while the site notes improvements vs. the unsiped tires (no links to published results), it does not mention how they performed vs dedicated winter/ice tires.

The story about the airport test sounded nice (again, no links to published results), but tuggers are ery heavy for their size and rarely go above 5 mph. Besides, the roads I travel rarely rarely require me to drive on/over/through pools of airplane de-icer.

Regarding wear, I can't think of any reason why siping would increase the life of a tire: there is less rubber, there are more edges to wear, and what is left gets hotter.

FWIW, my winter/ice tires have always had plenty of siping from the factory. They have a lower speed ratings than my dedicated summer performance tires (maybe they generate more heat?). During high-speed runs, the cars do not feel as "planted" as they do on the summer rubber with essentially continuous center "ribs". Steering feedback and response is sloppy compared to the summer tires with their big tread blocks. And they do whine on dry roads. (Of course, I am willing to make those trade-offs for other benefits.)

If you need winter tires, get them. The $11/tire you spend of siping will pay to have winter tires mounted/balanced. And you will have the right rubber for the weather all year long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, this is great, i knew i could count on some good comments, but instead, i got great advices. Always count on the :b5:ers :thumbup: .

To comment on a few point that were made, it is not about having the right tire, i was trying to get some different opinions. I am currently running stock 15's wheels (see pic below) with Toyo Spectrum 195/65R 15 and i love those tires. They are great all the way around, for any type of weather, but by next May, i will upgrade to 18's or 19's (most likely 18's) with performance tires, and i will keep my stock with the Toyo's for the winter month. So, is it worth it to do it when they will be for the cold month, or are they better as is?.



My other comment is to agree 2KT and the others is that siping does look like the pattern on snow tires, but why would they advertise it to be good for all tires all the time?

{quote}The story about the airport test sounded nice (again, no links to published results), but tuggers are ery heavy for their size and rarely go above 5 mph. Besides, the roads I travel rarely rarely require me to drive on/over/through pools of airplane de-icer. I saw that too, what a scenario :lol:

The Squirm part is something that i was not thinking about and it does make great sense. As of right now, i am keeping my great Toyo's as is. Thanks for the advises all :thumbup: .
 

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My preference is to buy tires with good factory siping. When the tires are about half worn, I have a tire shop sipe them at that point. I figure that the original siping is usually worn out and the rubber has hardened from the heat of all those miles. At least 6/32" of tread is required...the shortest siping blade is 5/32".

My siped tires feel just like they did before I siped them. I've done my own testing on a newly paved downhill road in the rain, twice the same day before and after siping, and the siped tires do skid less. It also seems to have slowed their wear, but that's hard to say.


Ken
 

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RAH said:
why would they advertise it to be good for all tires all the time?
$11/tire x 4 = $44 gross sale.

Labor cost to sipe: $2/tire.
Machine cost to sipe: $2/tire

Cost to sipe = $4 x 4 = $16

Gross profit = $28

Truthfully, if siping were such a great idea for all tires, then manufacturers would put the sipes in all their molds (not just winter tire molds).
 

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RAH, I siped the tires on my Yukon last year, and noted a big positive difference afterwards. BUT, I wouldn't do it on a vehicle that actually has any sort of handling/fun element like our Passats. The heat, squirm, etc is all true. For the Yukon, I siped a set of older mud and snow tires that needed some help, so it made sense since I was going to replace the tires in the spring anyway.
Alex C.
 

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RAH I have siped tires on SUVs I have had and if the factors are right its a great benifit .. if not its a waste. One posted there is less rubber ,, not true, siping cuts slits in the tire to increase tread flex with the purpose of releasing the snow in the tread making more tread avaialble for traction. It doesn't remove rubber. If the tire tread is stiff it doesn't release the snow and becomes a slick.

The heat generated isn't going to be much of a factor unless your winter driving is done at 80 Deg F.

I didn't see much advantage in wet driving but I did in all snow conditions and even more so where I had to climb around.

You will also experience more tread wear from the squirming.

If your only having a *month * of winter I wouldn't bother and isn't your area rather flat?
 
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