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I had my car aligned and aligned good. Steering wheel angle programmed and what not. I take the car for a drive, steering wheel is straight, not shaking, and no pulling. I was a happy camper, well I took it on the highway and going over 60mph it was pulling to the left. Weird pulling too, but at certain positions of the steering wheel. As far as I know when it's out of alignment it pulls all the time. Anyway, I take the car back to the alignment shop, and he puts in on the machine again and shows that it's dead on aligned, rear, front, camber, toe, caster, the whole shabbang. So then he takes it for a spin, comes back and says it's the tires. I was shocked and did not believe him, they're newer continental tires on a really good shape force balanced. He rotated the tires, and it was pulling on the other side, to the right. The exact same symptom but now pulling the other way. He put those tires on the rear, and rear's in the front, so now it's good, but he said the tire belt inside is broken, and I need new tires.

Have any of you had a broken belt on a pretty much newer tire?

I've done research on tires, and everyone's opinion is different, I'll get new tires come summer, but for now my continentals suck balls, noisy, and plus now with broken belt, but if you look at them they have over 90% thread, and look pretty much new.

What tires should I buy?

Thanks,
 

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Happens more frequently than you'd imagine.

I used to get belt edge issues with several different types of Michelins...seems they don't like to be run over ~44 psi unless you bought a V, Z, W or higher speed rating. Major problems with bumps in the tread on Michelin tires, belt-edge separation, not those sidewall bulges you may be familiar with. :crazy: I don't buy them any more...but then again, I don't need Michelins' "flavor of the day", 19-22 inch summer-only tire that possibly lasts for say ~8K miles of "fun" then done which IIRC, you can't buy these ~$300 tires in any speed rating lower than "V" so the tire construction techniques are a bit more stringent than those "H" rated Michelins I had issues with.

Yes, a bulge is obvious and will make you think your car's about to fall apart if you drive on a bad tire.

The Continentals (ContiPro Contact) do just fine at ~45psi and up...even for an H speed rating.

As an aside, the problems I had were on almost every (greater than 75 percent) Michelin tire (MXV Plus) I ran on two different cars over a four or five year period. Didn't buy these new - one set came about one-third used on a 2003 Accord (5 yrs ago).

FWIW, I almost never take advantage of a tire warranty. If a tire's that bad (consistently), I usually switch brands rather than paying to install a replacement...that may end up doing the same thing.
 

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It happens. Such damage should totally be covered by the tire warranty, assuming you haven't done anything crazy to the tire, like chunks missing from it due to a pothole. Any tire store that sells Conti's should be able to take care of this for you.
 

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I've had it happen too, but on a set of older tires that came with the car. If your tires had any kind of warranty on them now would be the time to capitalize on that :thumbup:
 

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Have used Conti for the last eight years. Had some side wall bubbles on early DWS 215.16.50s, but no failures or weird stuff. Used DWS06 225.16.55 last winter without issues. Using DW 225.17.50 this summer(just cleaned up the old Montreals with the DWS to install next month), again no issue. Tie rods are frozen, but alignment done 4 years ago still drives fine.
 

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Just a little tidbit regarding checking alignment while driving down the road.
Assuming tire pressures are correct and even from side to side...
Most roads have a crown on them for water to drain off towards the edges. If you happen to be on one of these roads the car will usually wander off to the right. Also you will notice that while on these roads you'll always need to apply pressure on the steering to keep it just left of centered orientation.
Driving down a heavily travelled road with a lot of truck / semi traffic will actually cause the road to wear with two channels down the lane. This will also persuade the car one direction or another.
If you can find a section of new road in the city this will be one of your best bets. Certain parts of the interstate right after re-paving will also be good for a test. But again that may depend on location and terrain of said area.

I've had brand new tires that were defective right from the get go.
Tires are constructed with overlapping layers or sheets of polyester and or steel wires laid out flat. If these layers shift or break loose it will change the outside shape of the tire which will drastically effect the way your car goes down the road.

As mentioned earlier, a tire should be covered under warranty for defective workmanship.
 
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