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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Time to replace valve cover gaskets, CCT gaskets, valley seals, etc. - NEW QUESTIONS

I just did the timing belt / water pump job on my daughter's 2004 Passat. Everything went smooth and now I'm ready to tackle the infamous burning oil smell. I purchased the gasket kit from Blauparts which includes the valve cover gaskets, CCT gaskets, valley seals, cam seals, sensor seals, and end caps. I've done quite a bit of research and I'm a bit perplexed as to which route to take to complete this job.

First
The instruction sheet included with the Blauparts kit makes mention to removing the cam sprockets. Apparently this is required in order to remove the cams? I'd really prefer not to go through the hassle of removing the timing belt all over again...that job took me about 15 hours. Additionally, the instruction sheet also isn't very clear in regards to where to make your timing marks with the white out prior to pulling the cams. Without being 100% sure of what to do, I'd prefer not to go down this path....

Second
I saw this step-by-step tutorial where the guy doesn't remove the cams...just loosens them to create enough room to replace the valley seals and CCT gaskets
http://www.passatworld.com/forums/6...95483-how-v6-cam-chain-tensioner-gaskets.html

Third
I saw this great video which features replacement of gaskets, cam seals, and caps but makes no mention of the CCT gaskets and valley seals. This instruction good to go?
Valve Cover Gasket, CamShaft Seal and Cap Replacement VW 2.8L - YouTube


Any advice on the direction I should go to perform this task in the quickest possible way without having to redo everything I just did over the weekend would be greatly appreciated. My daughter will be getting her license on July 9th and I would like to take care of as much of this preventative maintenance as possible....thanks!
 

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If the cam seals are not leaking you don't have to do them. That will not require any fiddling with the timing. All the work will be up top, ie, valve cover gasket and tensioner gasket and seal.

So my advice is to just do VCG and CCTG and after you've cleaned the area very well all around the engine to occasionally inspect for oil leaks and trace them to their source.

Before fixing the valve cover leaks though make sure your PCV system is not clogged.

User Resist has another thread going where you can find a laundry list of related things and how to sequence them.

What is the engine and mileage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the cam seals are not leaking you don't have to do them. That will not require any fiddling with the timing. All the work will be up top, ie, valve cover gasket and tensioner gasket and seal.

So my advice is to just do VCG and CCTG and after you've cleaned the area very well all around the engine to occasionally inspect for oil leaks and trace them to their source.

Before fixing the valve cover leaks though make sure your PCV system is not clogged.

User Resist has another thread going where you can find a laundry list of related things and how to sequence them.

What is the engine and mileage?
Thanks for the reply. 2.8L V6 with 130,000 miles. When I replaced the timing belt I took both sprockets off and inspected the cam seals. They were NOT leaking. The main crank seal was not leaking either. With that said, can I replace all of the others seals and gaskets by simply following the video I posted and the write up I posted that references loosening and lifting the cams to access the CCTG and valley seals?

Thanks for the tip about PCV system. I'll research that as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That is what I was saying Zak.. before you replace the valve cover gaskets, make sure your PCV system is OK. With that many miles, you will probably need to service the PCV system.

ECS tuning has the stage 1 PCV replacement kit for $124.

Volkswagen Passat B5 FWD V6 30v > Engine > Emissions > ES#1899536 PCV Service Kit - Stage 1 - 3B0198001

You can try Ebay to save some money, but I could not find anybody that sources it as a kit on Ebay. I did not want 5 parts coming from 5 different places
Yeah I got that link from you already Bill and I was planning on replacing it using that kit...my questions were more in regards to the procedure for replacing the CCTG and valley seals.
 

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I don't know what you mean by valley seals.

for the tensioner gasket and half moon you don't need to remove the cam caps. all you need is the tensioner special tool to compress it and get enough clearance to remove the old, clean the mating surfaces, inspect the tensioner screen for particles and such, and install the new gasket and half moon.

if you keep it at that level it is a fairly straightforward job. if you decide to go all in and remove the tensioners just to change their gaskets you must make sure you get the static timing correct. Keep it simple.

in the other thread I refered you to I mentioned that part of doing the valve cover job is managing the mess created by the leak over time. budget some time to deal with that along with the pcv system.

do you have a link for the video you are referencing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't know what you mean by valley seals.
Sorry, Blauparts refers to the half moon as a valley seal.

for the tensioner gasket and half moon you don't need to remove the cam caps. all you need is the tensioner special tool to compress it and get enough clearance to remove the old, clean the mating surfaces, inspect the tensioner screen for particles and such, and install the new gasket and half moon.

if you keep it at that level it is a fairly straightforward job. if you decide to go all in and remove the tensioners just to change their gaskets you must make sure you get the static timing correct. Keep it simple.
Alright, thanks. I just wanted to make sure that what I was reading was going to work for my application. Just double and triple checking before I start on any work.

in the other thread I refered you to I mentioned that part of doing the valve cover job is managing the mess created by the leak over time. budget some time to deal with that along with the pcv system.

do you have a link for the video you are referencing?
Will do.
Yes, I updated the original post with the video I found. Same guy I referenced when doing the timing belt kit. Just wanted to make sure this process would work fine for the front seals and end caps.
 

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I found it easier to remove the cam in order to replace the gasket beneath the adjuster. It's a little more labor intensive, BUT, here is an additional job you can consider doing with the adjuster out. Over time the pads that the cam chain runs over wears down with grooves in it. Eventually the grooves start to pit, and you'll develop a rattling noise from the chain hitting these. In some case, the pads can snap at the edges and cause a real clatter. I found that replacing these pads is good insurance for the adjuster, and is real easy to do. I did not replace these though until about 200,000 miles on a 1.8t.

But it's just another option:
#C062 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 VW Volkswagen Passat Beetle Jetta Golf Audi A4 A6 S4 TT Allroad 1.8 2.7 2.8 3.0 L Tensioner Pads

and as I said before, it'll be easier to work beneath the adjuster with the cam out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I found it easier to remove the cam in order to replace the gasket beneath the adjuster. It's a little more labor intensive, BUT, here is an additional job you can consider doing with the adjuster out. Over time the pads that the cam chain runs over wears down with grooves in it. Eventually the grooves start to pit, and you'll develop a rattling noise from the chain hitting these. In some case, the pads can snap at the edges and cause a real clatter. I found that replacing these pads is good insurance for the adjuster, and is real easy to do. I did not replace these though until about 200,000 miles on a 1.8t.

But it's just another option:
#C062 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 VW Volkswagen Passat Beetle Jetta Golf Audi A4 A6 S4 TT Allroad 1.8 2.7 2.8 3.0 L Tensioner Pads

and as I said before, it'll be easier to work beneath the adjuster with the cam out.
The Blauparts instructions are great for the most part but aren't all that clear in other areas....

1) Can the cams come out without removing the timing belt sprockets?
2) Where do you make the marks with white out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The OP's vehicle is 2004 B5.5, and the URL shown above is the ECS PCV kit for the up-to-2001 B5 cars. The ECS PCV kits for the from-2001 B5.5 vehicles (showing the VIN split) is further down on this page.
Yeah I saw that. I would make sure to get the correct one for my vehicle.
 

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My recent experience with replacement in BOTH of our 2.8 models over the past year is this: The CCT represents by far the biggest hassle and potential screwup of the entire job. If the leak is minor (or nonexistant), you may want to skip it altogether. Focus on VCGs, cam endcaps, and the breather system

The VCGs weren't too bad, ranging from "pretty easy" on the AHA to "PITA due to clearance" on the ATQ. But a much more manageable job when you don't have to mess with the cams.

I love Blauparts, but their instructions were very short on details, IMO. I was also amazed at how much minor, meaningful differences there were between the two V6 engines.

And when all was said and done, I resolve the burning smell in both cars with just the cam endcaps. Worth their weight in gold :D
 

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I don't know what you mean by valley seals.
Despite what Blauparts may say, the 'valley' gasket is for the die-cast aluminum cover plate under the intake manifold. Valley in this case refers to the low place between the cylinder heads on a "V" engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Quick update.

On Saturday a buddy of mine and I got to working on the car again. I managed to pull the driver's side valve cover off, and did the rear cam seal, plug, inner and outer valve cover gaskets. Did NOT do the CCT gaskets or half moon seals. After looking at the position of everything, I said I'm going to pass on this for now....looked like too big of a job and I really didn't feel like pulling the cams or loosening the chain, etc. We also did not do the front cam seals because when we did the timing belt, water pump, and thermostat, there was no leakeage coming from this area.

Second we did the passengers side which was much easier once the air box and dip stick were removed. On this side again, we did not do the front area which I suspect is the cam seal and plug for this side since this head is reversed (cam chain being in the rear of the motor)? Again, no leakage was detected from the seals in the front when we had the sprockets apart so we passed on these seals as well. Also, this side looked much cleaner around the valve cover gaskets than the driver's side did so we only did the VCG (inner and outer).

Last night I took it for a drive after letting everything sit for 24 hours to give the silicone a chance to cure. I noticed that the burning oil smell is gone when I turn the heater or AC on. However after driving it for about 10-15 minutes there is still some faint smoke coming from the engine bay. Could this be the CCT gaskets or half moon seals leaking since we didn't replace them or old oil still sitting on the exhaust manifolds burning off?

Any insight is appreciated. Thanks!
 

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probably the old oil. the worst part of a valve cover leak is he mess it makes of your engine and anything downstream. you will need to degrease the engine thoroughly a few times. a good steam cleaning would work.

also useful.to help you trace any other leaks in the future.

there will still be a leak from the cct, more so if your PCV is clogged. space is tight but I think you should replace the CCT gasket and seal. do just one on the bank that seemed more accessible to you and then he harder one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
probably the old oil. the worst part of a valve cover leak is he mess it makes of your engine and anything downstream. you will need to degrease the engine thoroughly a few times. a good steam cleaning would work.

also useful.to help you trace any other leaks in the future.

there will still be a leak from the cct, more so if your PCV is clogged. space is tight but I think you should replace the CCT gasket and seal. do just one on the bank that seemed more accessible to you and then he harder one.
Thanks for the reply man. Yeah I did one round of pressure washing before I did any of the work. Took a squirt bottle of Simple Green and sprayed the entire top and bottom of the engine, axles, brake areas, etc. Let it sit for 10-15 minutes and then pressured washed it off. It got pretty clean but obviously I didn't get every nook and cranny as my hands got pretty dirty on both jobs anyway. Perhaps I'll give it another go.

Well the driver's side bank seemed easier because the CCT is in the front....there just seemed to be more space to work there. Is that right? But again, I didn't notice any leaks coming from that area when we pulled the driver's side cam sprocket. Since I didn't see any leakage, I just assumed that the CCT was on the back side of that bank and that's why I couldn't see anything obvious. Imagine my surprise when we took that valve cover off and the CCT, chain, and sprockets were on the front end on that bank. That's one of the reasons why we didn't attempt to replace the CCT gaskets and half moon seals...we didn't see any leaks coming from that area at all.

I'm really hoping it's just old oil or coolant (from bleeding the system) getting burned off and that the smell will go away soon. My daughter is slated to get her license on Wednesday and all I have left is the air filter, oil change, axles, and motor mounts. I'm holding off a bit on the axles and motor mounts until I do a bit more research on lower the sub frame but I'm hoping she doesn't have to deal with burning oil on her "new" car.


Also, I didn't touch the PCV system. I figure worst case scenario, I just buy new VCG since I have like 6 cam seals left over and I still have my CCT gaskets and half moon seals. If I have to do it over again because the PCV system is clogged and that causes more leaks...it's not the end of the world....
 
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