Volkswagen Passat Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I haven't done a timing belt job before and thus would like to have some guidance for the first time around. This is a request for someone who's willing to share their garage with me and help me get this done correctly, as I live in anapartment with only a parking lot to work in and the Oly WA weather likes to be rainy.

If this is the wrong place for such a request feel free to move it to the right spot.

My stepdad and I have the same car basically. Two passats, his 2003, auto, and sedan, mine 2004, manual, wagon, both are 1.8T FWD. Both will need TB jobs done soon, but his is far more urgent.

I've got the ECS Ultimate PLus kit for the TB job. All three belts, tensioner, roller, metal impeller water pump, thermostat and housing plus bolts, and 3L of undiluted G13.

Stepdad is offering pizza and $150 for the help here. Hopefully there's someone not too far from westside Oly who can help. I did have a retired VW technician who's a classmate of mine, but he's moving to Spokane at the end of the month so going to him is out of the question as he won't have a free weekend.

Basically, I would like some guidance and help doing this first one to get the hang of it since it's the first TB job I'd ever be taking on. This is the stepdad's commuting car so I really don't want to fubar anything.
 

·
I had a steering knuckle in my shed. Really!
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
I'm on the wrong coast for help, but be glad to know that this is one of the easiest timing belt jobs to do.

Swing the lock carrier open (the AC hoses act like a hinge) to get full and free access to everything.

To make it basically fool-proof, paint matchmarks on the original belt and cam & crank sprockets. Carefully and exactly transfer these marks to the new belt, and use them to make sure the new belt is on right and the timing is correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,817 Posts
Easiest path to accomplish this task the first time through would be to find a copy of the Haynes Manual (not the best, but most widely available) or the link below to read through the process of what needs to happen to complete the job successfully.

Here's Daddy Matt's AEB Timing Belt Replacement Procedure for you to review so you can decide whether you want to proceed or have a shop tackle the job. AEB is the engine code; however, your engine code(s) for '03 and '04 will be AWM. Major difference is the AWM water pump is driven by the timing belt, not an accessory v-belt as on the AEB engine.

First time through, it should take no more than ~8-10 hours if you've never replaced a timing belt & tensioner (not to mention the assortment of tools you'll need to complete the job) and water pump. The cooling system and perhaps heater core will give you grief, especially if anything other than G12/G13 coolant has been used.

edit: Generic white-out has been used here to mark the old belt/sprockets as zak mentions in the post above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm on the wrong coast for help, but be glad to know that this is one of the easiest timing belt jobs to do.

Swing the lock carrier open (the AC hoses act like a hinge) to get full and free access to everything.

To make it basically fool-proof, paint matchmarks on the original belt and cam & crank sprockets. Carefully and exactly transfer these marks to the new belt, and use them to make sure the new belt is on right and the timing is correct.

How do I get to where I can swing it like so? I haven't been able to find a guide that details this. I'm assuming the cooling system must be drained, but that's a given for this job(especially since I have 3L of undiluted G13). What else must be done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
How do I get to where I can swing it like so? I haven't been able to find a guide that details this. I'm assuming the cooling system must be drained, but that's a given for this job(especially since I have 3L of undiluted G13). What else must be done?
Electron Man linked the how-to in the post just above yours. ;)

And, true, you don't need to drain the cooling system just to pull the front end into the service position. But, you do for a water pump replacement. So, just drain it while you're pulling the front end apart. And, the lock carrier can move out a lot farther, if you remove the upper radiator hose.

And, as for support bolts for the carrier:
I picked up a pair of M8x1.25 x 120mm bolts from Lowe's. More than long enough, and more than strong enough to support the carrier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Okay I feel I should clarify. I know how to get into service position. I was more curious how one gets to where they can swing the whole carrier out "like the AC hoses were a hinge"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
It'll just do that fairly naturally.
With the pair of long bolts screwed into the body (one on each side), when you pull the carrier out, it'll tend to rotate out from the body on its own. And, again, it does it a lot easier if the upper radiator hose is detached from the radiator.
It really makes sense, once you're doing it.
 

·
I had a steering knuckle in my shed. Really!
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
^no.

You have to drain the cooling system and disconnect the rad hoses. Then you swing the lock carrier open, with the AC hoses acting like a hinge (no pressure on them of course).



This is my A4 when I did my timing belt job. Look at the clear and easy access.

Edit: you can see the matchmarks I made with pink nail polish on the belt and sprockets. Looks like the lock carrier is on the right, and the AC condenser is out of frame to the left. I was also replacing the radiator at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,817 Posts
Okay I feel I should clarify. I know how to get into service position. I was more curious how one gets to where they can swing the whole carrier out "like the AC hoses were a hinge"
Looking at the photo in zak's post above, you can see the lock carrier has been removed from the front end (pass. side rubber trim on upper edge of lock carrier shown leaning against driver's fender); and the hoses from the A/C condenser just barely visible to the side of passenger's fender. It is likely a two-person, multi-step operation (remove A/C condenser from LC, pull LC off, rotate A/C condenser over next to pass. fender and set on ground).

I actually prefer the AEB water pump (WP) configuration though as changing the WP on ATW or AWM code 1.8Ts means you're completing a "big job within a project" (i.e. drain, refill, and bleed the cooling system after replacing WP and thermostat [easy-peasy :rolleyes:]). 'Druther just change the timing belt alone then go back 50-60K miles or more later to pull the LC and change the WP...no option to go this route with ATW or AWM 1.8Ts (timing belt driven WP).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
^no.

You have to drain the cooling system and disconnect the rad hoses. Then you swing the lock carrier open, with the AC hoses acting like a hinge (no pressure on them of course).

This is my A4 when I did my timing belt job. Look at the clear and easy access.
Well, my bad.....
I used my Bentley for reference, as well as this thread at PassatWorld for extra info (plus helpful pictures.)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top