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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am building new struts. I don't want to re-use any of the old parts, I wanted to get new components where rubber is involved.

The Bilstein B4 (Touring) I ordered came with a new (slightly larger diameter) bottom plate. The plate did not include a rubber spring seat:
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I wanted the rubber too, therefore ordered a second part which consisted of the metal spring seat (OEM size which I will not use) and the rubber seat:
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Both of these parts come with some holes punched in. The Bilstein only has one hole. The OEM style has 3 (1 big and 2 smaller). What purpose do these serve? Do I need to align the rubber with the holes in any particular way when I transfer it from the OEM to the Bilstein?

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This is what my new strut looks like. I'm using Eibach Pro-kit (30mm lower) springs, and 1BE bump stops. Is there any reason to cut these down any further, or are the 1BE bump stops short enough for the Pro-kit?

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As far as the plates, those are water drain holes. It usually goes on the back side where the hole is at the lowest point.

Bump stops... hopefully someone else with experience with those springs will chime in.
 

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Agreed on above, plus, the 1BE stops should be short enough. It's what I am running on ~25mm springs with no harshness.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys!

As far as the plates, those are water drain holes. It usually goes on the back side where the hole is at the lowest point.
Makes perfect sense now that you say it, although would I have never imagined that my suspension had drain holes 😂.
 

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I used to cut the stock bump stops as I would hit them while still on my Eibach setup. The ride was much smoother with them cut. I even cut the 1BE stops as I wanted that extra suspension travel before they were contacted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I used to cut the stock bump stops as I would hit them while still on my Eibach setup. The ride was much smoother with them cut. I even cut the 1BE stops as I wanted that extra suspension travel before they were contacted.
Yeah, I saw some older posts where people mentioned cutting 1BE bump stops. Any ideas as to how many inches to cut? Also, this will increase the risk of my oil pan hitting the floor when I hit a pothole or bump, right? That's my main worry about cutting them at the moment.
 

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Yeah, I saw some older posts where people mentioned cutting 1BE bump stops. Any ideas as to how many inches to cut? Also, this will increase the risk of my oil pan hitting the floor when I hit a pothole or bump, right? That's my main worry about cutting them at the moment.
If modifying the Passat suspension at all, general rule of thumb, a Thor (or equivalent) belly pan is HIGHLY recommended.
 

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If modifying the Passat suspension at all, general rule of thumb, a Thor (or equivalent) belly pan is HIGHLY recommended.
Or, just be careful what you run over ;). I've been lowered for almost 16 years and haven't hit a thing. Still original belly pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If modifying the Passat suspension at all, general rule of thumb, a Thor (or equivalent) belly pan is HIGHLY recommended.
I guess I'll have to look for one once the suspension is installed.

Or, just be careful what you run over ;). I've been lowered for almost 16 years and haven't hit a thing. Still original belly pan.
In Italy our highways are super smooth (smoother than German autobahns I would say). But our B-roads suck. I hit a pothole in my passat a few years back at night, sometimes you just don't see them coming in the dark. Burst my tire (it was a 225/45/17 to be fair) but still... I guess extra caution is always a good thing though, especially at the start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Another Suspension Question 😂, and by the way thank you PZ, VAGguy, and AndreasPassat. Im very grateful for all the help!

I just put my strut together with a spring compressor like this:
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The shock is not 100% concentric in regards with the top mount of the strut. Is this a problem? Is it better to compress it again and try to re-center it?

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Also, I read something about an 11 degree offset but apparently it was only hard to get this angle with stock shocks, I have billys so I should be fine right?
 

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I guess I'll have to look for one once the suspension is installed.



In Italy our highways are super smooth (smoother than German autobahns I would say). But our B-roads suck. I hit a pothole in my passat a few years back at night, sometimes you just don't see them coming in the dark. Burst my tire (it was a 225/45/17 to be fair) but still... I guess extra caution is always a good thing though, especially at the start.
The states I've lived in, the roads just suck. So that's just me being overly cautious regarding the oil pan. It only holds the life blood of my engine. :whistle:
 

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The shock is not 100% concentric in regards with the top mount of the strut. Is this a problem? Is it better to compress it again and try to re-center it?

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Well technically the bump stop gets pressed into the upper mount first. Then it should aid in alignment of the shock when the assembly is tighten down. In reality I think your fine. My concern is when the bump stop gets seated by normal shock travel, it could get crushed in an improper way.
 

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If the top mount is centered, I would leave it. It's a personal choice to cut the bump stops. If the roads are that bad, you should leave them. I bottomed out much less after the car was lowered, but the springs and shocks were much stiffer than stock.
 

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The concentricity “is what it is”. As long as nothing contacts anything, I wouldn’t worry.

The 11 degree thing is to align the shock for in-vehicle mounting. In other words, when you put the top cap with its 3 nut-holes on, the holes for the bottom shock mount should be aligned with the control arm. Eyeball close is usually good enough.
 

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I'm going to be the odd man out here.
Using the factory springs, the bottom end of the spring where the coil ends is supposed to be 90° (± 2°) from the centerline of the bolt that secure the strut to the lower control arm.
The radial location of the coil spring will have an effect of the centering of the top mount.

Seeing that you're using Eibach springs there should be some reference as to how to 'clock' the spring.


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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The concentricity “is what it is”. As long as nothing contacts anything, I wouldn’t worry.
I guess at this point if it was a huge issue we'd be reading posts about it.
It's a personal choice to cut the bump stops. If the roads are that bad, you should leave them. I bottomed out much less after the car was lowered, but the springs and shocks were much stiffer than stock.
Yeah sounds good, I guess I can always cut them later if necessary.
the bottom end of the spring where the coil ends is supposed to be 90° (± 2°) from the centerline of the bolt
Is this mainly to ensure that that drain hole is at the bottom of the strut?

Seeing that you're using Eibach springs there should be some reference as to how to 'clock' the spring.
My Eibach springs literally came with in a big red box with no paperwork other than a sheet that says to go online and download the TUV (German approval) certificate. On their official website they don't have any documentation on installing the springs.

I think the best thing to do is to remove the old struts and just line up the new ones with the old ones as best as possible. As im not reusing any of the old parts its quite easy to compare between old and new.
 

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Is this mainly to ensure that that drain hole is at the bottom of the strut?
That and I think it might also have something to do with the way the spring compresses.
That's coming from someone who does mechanical design all day long for a career.


My Eibach springs literally came with in a big red box with no paperwork other than a sheet that says to go online and download the TUV (German approval) certificate. On their official website they don't have any documentation on installing the springs.

I think the best thing to do is to remove the old struts and just line up the new ones with the old ones as best as possible. As im not reusing any of the old parts its quite easy to compare between old and new.
I would have thought some notes would have been inside the box.
Sounds like a plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Managed to get the old strut out....
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I eyeballed the alignment with the new one... probably could have re-used the rubber parts and top mounts as they were in perfect condition (I have no idea how, this car was parked on the road for 19 years, all suspension components are still from the factory)

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Installed with new upper arms... gonna do the lower one tomorrow because I wasn't able to separate the ball joints after an hour of trying. Got a ball joint separator on amazon which I hope will do the trick.

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For anyone wondering, the old shocks are not concentric either, just a bit better than mine though.

old shocks:

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Did you slather the pinch bolt with anti-seize? It just occurred to me that I don’t think I’ve used the word “slather” in any other context for the past few years.
Not yet but I will. Although my pinch bolt was one of the easiest bolts to undo. I was dreading it and imagining I would need a torch. Was able to undo it just using 2 standard wrenches and some penetrating oil. Took a total of 3 minutes. I guess that's the greatest thing about living outside the rust belt.
 
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