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Discussion Starter #1
Just got back from my garage. Installed my slotted front brake discs. I just thought... Could I had installed them in the wrong direction? Should the "slotts" point in any special direction for better cooling or not wearing out the pads.....
Please help, shit do I have to change them tomorrow.....?
 

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If they were new rotors, they should have an R and an L stamped on the hat to let you know which one goes on each side. I've noticed that different manufacturers put the slots in different ways, so follow the markings instead of the slot direction.
 

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that depends on whether your disc has a directional ventilation.

It is supposed to draw air from the center/hat and blow out to the inner surface of the wheel.

If the disc ventilation isn't directional, I wouldn't think the direction of the slotts matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's OEM discs that A friend of mine "slotted" for me. Hav'nt seen a R & L on them, because on OEM discs there are'nt any, right??
 

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Generally NO, they do not have special direction....unless the cooling vanes are directed. if they are just plane straight, no problem.
 

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in most cases you should have the part of the slot pionting toward the back of the carwhen you look at am on the top part. as a rule i will not make much of a differnece but it helps to dissipate heat better :thumbup:
 

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2.0GTI said:
in most cases you should have the part of the slot pionting toward the back of the carwhen you look at am on the top part. as a rule i will not make much of a differnece but it helps to dissipate heat better :thumbup:
I had PowerSlot rotors installed 3 weeks ago, and they are directional. Putting them on the wrong way would, IMO, affect water dispersion, since instead of the centrifical force of the spinning rotor pushing the water out, it's going to push it in.

-Craig
 

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outrun said:
2.0GTI said:
in most cases you should have the part of the slot pionting toward the back of the carwhen you look at am on the top part. as a rule i will not make much of a differnece but it helps to dissipate heat better :thumbup:
I had PowerSlot rotors installed 3 weeks ago, and they are directional. Putting them on the wrong way would, IMO, affect water dispersion, since instead of the centrifical force of the spinning rotor pushing the water out, it's going to push it in.

-Craig
This is correct.
They should wipe from the inside out when rotating forward.
Another way of describing it would be the slot should travel from the inside out when rotating forward.
Does this make any sense?
 

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dkosto99 said:
outrun said:
2.0GTI said:
in most cases you should have the part of the slot pionting toward the back of the carwhen you look at am on the top part. as a rule i will not make much of a differnece but it helps to dissipate heat better :thumbup:
I had PowerSlot rotors installed 3 weeks ago, and they are directional. Putting them on the wrong way would, IMO, affect water dispersion, since instead of the centrifical force of the spinning rotor pushing the water out, it's going to push it in.

-Craig
This is correct.
They should wipe from the inside out when rotating forward.
Another way of describing it would be the slot should travel from the inside out when rotating forward.
Does this make any sense?

Are we now talking about all season tires?....

Brakes shouldn't see that much water to worry about routing it out. The slots on the rotor may scrape water off the pads, but this would still be very small amount.

Well, since it really doesn't matter, you can have the slots directed however one pleases, as long as the rotor have non-directional cooling vanes.
 

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PASSAT2001.5 said:
Are we now talking about all season tires?....

Brakes shouldn't see that much water to worry about routing it out. The slots on the rotor may scrape water off the pads, but this would still be very small amount.

Well, since it really doesn't matter, you can have the slots directed however one pleases, as long as the rotor have non-directional cooling vanes.
The stock rotors/pads, in the rain, would provide ZERO stopping power for a good 5 seconds, and in my opinion are dangerous.

I do know that PowerSlot rotors are directional and are stamped with L and R.

-Craig
 

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Here's what stoptech says about properly installing a directional rotor.

http://www.stoptech.com/faq/data/faq16.html


How do I tell what direction the rotors go on the car?


(Driver's perspective looking forward)


The StopTech AeroRotors® are directional. If they are not installed on the proper side of the vehicle, airflow will be restricted and cooling will be severely diminished. The vanes on a rotor act like a centrifugal air fan, drawing air from the inside of the rotor and flowing it to the outside. The vanes of a directional rotor should arch back like arms on a pinwheel. On the top side of the rotor, the vanes should curve toward the back of the car.



(Driver's perspective looking forward)

The slots on StopTech AeroRotors are cut in the OPPOSITE direction of the vanes. The pattern on a drilled AeroRotor also has the same appearance. The direction of the slots or hole pattern should not be used to determine what side of the vehicle to place a rotor. Different manufacturers may have different strategies for slot and hole patterns.

The only correct way to determine what side a directional rotor goes on is the internal vane direction.
 

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Quote:
How do I tell what direction the rotors go on the car?


(Driver's perspective looking forward)


The StopTech AeroRotors® are directional. If they are not installed on the proper side of the vehicle, airflow will be restricted and cooling will be severely diminished. The vanes on a rotor act like a centrifugal air fan, drawing air from the inside of the rotor and flowing it to the outside. The vanes of a directional rotor should arch back like arms on a pinwheel. On the top side of the rotor, the vanes should curve toward the back of the car.



(Driver's perspective looking forward)

The slots on StopTech AeroRotors are cut in the OPPOSITE direction of the vanes. The pattern on a drilled AeroRotor also has the same appearance. The direction of the slots or hole pattern should not be used to determine what side of the vehicle to place a rotor. Different manufacturers may have different strategies for slot and hole patterns.

The only correct way to determine what side a directional rotor goes on is the internal vane direction.
this was what i mean, the slots on the rotor surface are different from one manifacturer to another, yet the cooling vanes(center) always go in one direction and thats what offers heat dissipation.
 

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PASSAT2001.5 said:
Here's what stoptech says about properly installing a directional rotor.

http://www.stoptech.com/faq/data/faq16.html


How do I tell what direction the rotors go on the car?


(Driver's perspective looking forward)


The StopTech AeroRotors® are directional. If they are not installed on the proper side of the vehicle, airflow will be restricted and cooling will be severely diminished. The vanes on a rotor act like a centrifugal air fan, drawing air from the inside of the rotor and flowing it to the outside. The vanes of a directional rotor should arch back like arms on a pinwheel. On the top side of the rotor, the vanes should curve toward the back of the car.



(Driver's perspective looking forward)

The slots on StopTech AeroRotors are cut in the OPPOSITE direction of the vanes. The pattern on a drilled AeroRotor also has the same appearance. The direction of the slots or hole pattern should not be used to determine what side of the vehicle to place a rotor. Different manufacturers may have different strategies for slot and hole patterns.

The only correct way to determine what side a directional rotor goes on is the internal vane direction.
Look at the cooling vanes,they are directional. If they would be straight and not curved there would not be big diff. In EU Brembo is selling them either way because vanes inside of disc are not directional. Passat GT kit from Brembo in EU (drilled) is even sold that way like you have 2 "left" or 2 "right" drilled discs. When I was in Italy I visited Brembo and their engineers explained me that they did not encountered any gains or loss in cooling discs so that is why they did not made tham "symetric". I have that kind of discs on my car.
 
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