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Discussion Starter #1
So as I mentioned in another thread I proposed to my girlfriend last night and gave her the ring. The diamond was her great great grandmothers from 1885. The ring was from 1942 when her Great Grandmother had it put in its current setting on her 25th wedding anniversary. Basically this ring has been through 5 generations in her family.

So the point is this ring has to definitely be resized to her finger. It is too small right now. Basically the ring has a very very thin band with the diamonds set on top of it. The diamonds are set in these little designed blocks (I have no idea the terminology) that are attached to the band. It is a very classic style.

Okay, so neither of us know anything about rings (as you've probably figured out). So we are planning on going to a jewler this weekend to see what should be done. She would sort of like to keep the main part of the setting but maybe a new, and slightly thicker, band.

Basically, I need to know from you ring experts out there... I'm not even sure what I'm talking about makes sense. Does it? Also, what is possible? Can a jewler keep part of the ring but put a new band on? What things should we look for in a jewler? Any resources (web sites) so I could learn more about this stuff.
 

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First off, congratulations!

Secondly, let her dream for a bit. She's been dreaming of planning and now she'll get to plan. Just keep things in perspective that it's one very special day of an entire lifetime. You don't have to be practical about the wedding itself until reality sets back in in a few weeks.

Finally, when sizing the ring you want to go to a skilled craftsman who knows what he/she is doing and can quantify the work in terms of what to expect. Interview jewelrymakers and get their opinions on how the ring can be made to fit while preserving the setting. You may have to consider buying a little more of the material to add to the band while acheiving a match in quality of the original metal. A good artist will recognize the significance of the ring and won't leave you hanging on his/her appreciation of that fact. You'll find the person you want to work with and you'll be happy you took your time.

It's an awful thing to think about, but make sure the ring is insured and have it appraised for replacement value before you consign it for sizing.
 

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1) Congrats !

2) Scotaku gave some very good advice ...

3) Check out reputable estate jewellers in the area ... a good reference source is:

http://www.pricescope.com

The main focus of the site is diamonds/gems, but it is frequented by some excellent jewellers ... and their advice could be very helpful for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Scotaku and Doc for the advice.

So I think her Grandmother just got the ring appraised 6 months ago. Is there some paperwork or something that comes along with this? I'm assuming that is something that should go in a safe deposit box.

And then I'll look into insurance before getting the ring worked on.

Now... for jewelrymakers. What sort of questions should we ask when interviewing Jewelrymakers? What things do I need to look for? Should we just go to 3 or 4 places and get a feeling for it?

Also, on that www.periscope.com site... does it actually have a listing of jewelry makers? I can't seem to find it.

Thanks all. I appreciate the help.
 

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If the ring was appraised, there will be a signed appraisal ... make a copy & keep the original in a safe deposit box.

Check out Chubb for insurance ...

Ask the jeweller about their training & experience ... somebody with a certification in jewellery fabrication / manufacture from GIA is a good start ... make sure of who will actually be doing the work [you want the person with the cert, not an apprentice] ... make sure they are familiar with estate / heirloom / antique pieces & old manufacturing / fabrication techniques & materials ...

The Pricescope forums [like the forums here] are frequented by some very good folks ... post your questions there, and I'm sure you'll get good responses.
 

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Check your PM.
I had our rings custom made in your area. (Willow glen)
I drove the 3hrs to see this guy who is a diamond broker and does some of the 49ers jewelry.
I was referred through a friend who was his caddy at silvercreek country club. :lol:
Im getting married next month :nervous: .
But anyway this guy saved me well over 5000.00
Total of about 3 carats, F quality VS 1 diamonds (appraised) for under 4K.
And our rings are drop dead beautiful.
I would post a pic but the site for verragio is flash.
:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
 

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i majored in metalsmithing my first time through college and i have done the kind of thing your fiancee is wanting done. I altered a ring for my sister-in-law and her husband's family-heirloom-type ring. For my sister-in-law, the original ring was too large, as well as having a very thin shank(technical term for the band portion of the ring), and there was no way to size it as small as it needed to be without distorting and weakening the settings (the "designed blocks" ).What i was able to do in her case was to solder(with gold solder, not lead solder) a plain flat rectangular white gold band inside the original ring so that the outer diameter of the new band fit the inner diameter of the old ring and the inner dia. of the new band was the right size for my in-law's finger(very tiny).The width of the new inner band was wider than the thin half round cross section of the old shank, but the same width as the base of the stone settings, giving the ring a very clean classy look while also making it much stronger. For your rig, a similar alteration could be done by adding the appropriately sized ring stock to the bottom of the shank and then adding the inserted band . Gold solder lines don't show, so the whole thing will look like a solid piece, not a tacked together POS.My sister-in law lives in berkeley,so i might be able to arrange a meeting for you and your (i'm sure) lovely bride-to-be to see the work i did. I am not ,however, trying to sell you my services. i am too busy with work, the kids, etc that free time is worth way more to me than money. i just thought i would offer you a free design idea. if hooking up with my sister in law seems too wierd, you could email me your address,and i could send you a drawing of what i am talking about. Any competent jeweler(meaning don't go to the mall) could fabricate it for you. Congratulations and good luck.
 
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