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Ok so I'm in a position Where I changed out Rear Pads on my 2003 Passat,(wagon) B5, and now the brake pedal Drops straight to floor.. Won't tighten up at all. Do I try bleeding them? I went out and bout the Rear piston decompression tool, and I can't get Pistons to press back out. I have no breaks at this moment and I'm. Family of 5 . Really need so.e advice to get my VW back rolling. Can someone tell me how to get rear Pistons to press back out?
 

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I moved this form another thread so as not to confuse the issue.

What decompression tool do you speak of? You mean the one where it winds the caliper piston back in? How did you retract the pistons to replace the pads? Did you try using the e-brake a few times?
 

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Yes I did couple, I read Hanes book and followed the procedure. I know there's something simple I'm missing, cause I'm not getting any faults on diagnostic system.
 

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And you won't get anything other than a low fluid level notification.. You also don't really need to bleed the brakes when you just do a brake job. Only need to flush every 2 years or so.

Pictures of the brakes and tool might help. Also, think uo could answer the original questions other than the e-brake?
 

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I moved this form another thread so as not to confuse the issue.

What decompression tool do you speak of? You mean the one where it winds the caliper piston back in? How did you retract the pistons to replace the pads? Did you try using the e-brake a few times?
I bought the $121.99 piston decompression tool kit at advance auto parts. That properly Screws piston in clock wise.. didn't want to try c-clamp and mess up seals..
 

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Keep the reservoir filled and keep pumping the brake pedal, but do not let it go too far down. Other than that, jus tmake sure all other bleeders are tight. Did you crack any other bleeders open or unscrew any lines?
 

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I think that the pistons do retract into the caliper by turning clockwise.

Unless the OP opened up the hydraulic system, there isn't any way the air can get in. I think that he needs to give us the step-by-step he used so we can see where it went wrong.
 

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I think that the pistons do retract into the caliper by turning clockwise.

Unless the OP opened up the hydraulic system, there isn't any way the air can get in. I think that he needs to give us the step-by-step he used so we can see where it went wrong.
Yes, clockwise. It is possible to have air get into the system while turning the rear calipers in. The seals can deflect enough to allow air in. It's rare, but it has happened before, especially in areas that have corrosion as the piston surface may no longer be perfectly smooth.
 

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It is possible to have air get into the system while turning the rear calipers in. The seals can deflect enough to allow air in. It's rare, but it has happened before, especially in areas that have corrosion as the piston surface may no longer be perfectly smooth.
As a previous northern rust belt dweller I can vouch for the accuracy of this statement.
 

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I think that the pistons do retract into the caliper by turning clockwise.
Mine is a 2002 1.8T AWM. I changed the rear pads about 5 years ago. I started to take out the old pads and used a piston caliper tool. I only turned it clockwise but it did not retract. I did the same with the other rear wheel and was not able to retract the piston. Then I reinstalled the old pads and took it to a shop. He charged $50 to put the new pads on. I asked him and he told me the piston had to be turned counter clockwise to retract. The rest is history.
 

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Mine is a 2002 1.8T AWM. I changed the rear pads about 5 years ago. I started to take out the old pads and used a piston caliper tool. I only turned it clockwise but it did not retract. I did the same with the other rear wheel and was not able to retract the piston. Then I reinstalled the old pads and took it to a shop. He charged $50 to put the new pads on. I asked him and he told me the piston had to be turned counter clockwise to retract. The rest is history.
The mechanic was mistaken. They definitely retract clockwise. No matter what year B5 or B5.5. You may occasionally need to turn ccw if it binds, but it will retract clockwise.


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Mine is a 2002 1.8T AWM. I changed the rear pads about 5 years ago. I started to take out the old pads and used a piston caliper tool. I only turned it clockwise but it did not retract. I did the same with the other rear wheel and was not able to retract the piston. Then I reinstalled the old pads and took it to a shop. He charged $50 to put the new pads on. I asked him and he told me the piston had to be turned counter clockwise to retract. The rest is history.
3 or so years ago I replaced the rear pads on my 98 GLS, I turned one of the pistons for what seemed an eternity. One of the sides was so worn down the brake pad backing plate was digging into the rotor, thus a fully extended piston. Corrosion had built up around the piston (as mentioned in post 9 & 10) it took quite a bit of effort to get it back in.
If you've never done a rear brake job on a Passat before, I can certainly understand how some might think they are doing it wrong.
 

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what seemed an eternity
That's actually what exactly happened. I turned the pistons for quite sometime with no result. FInally I gave it up and had to take it to a shop. Don't know how he did it but he said "you were turning it the wrong direction".
 

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During the following procedure, make sure the fluid level doesn't get too low.
Apply and release the hand brake several times ( until it works)
Pump the pedal several times and recheck the hand brake.

NOTE: The fluid should be completely replaced every 2 years, whether you think it needs it or not.
 
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