Volkswagen Passat Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have no idea if any of you know high end calculators or not. Anyways, I have an older HP48g (use to have a gx before it got stolen). I love this calculator. Over the years I've become pretty quick with RPN/Stack based calculation.

Here is my problem. I'm taking an exam this weekend and they have banned the use of these calculators (this is the first test they have done it on). I cannot have a calculator that has the following:
-Communication capability (IR)
-Text Based revisions.

My dream is to find a calculator that does not have the above but also is RPN & has a stack. Since this is for engineering it should be engineering based, not financial based.

I looked on HP's website and their current set of calculators don't cut it. Anyone have any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
ebay, for a used hp.

I also love the old hp RPN. I bought a used lcd/text hp calc (the one that used slide-in magnetic cards - yes, THAT old). but that wouldnt' work for you since I think they want to avoid you having STORED hints or notes in there. I bet that's their point.

just find one with no memory. like an old hp25 that doesn't have text (old old LED style).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,500 Posts
Man... This is reminding me of my college days when they didn't understand that caculators were programable... I'd progam all sorts of long equasions that we were supposed to memorize and cross check answers... of course we had to show our work but if the answer didn't match my calc. then I knew I'd made a mistake somewhere... :weirdo: such a bad student was I :weirdo:

Now they all know what's up! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
linux-works said:
ebay, for a used hp.

I also love the old hp RPN. I bought a used lcd/text hp calc (the one that used slide-in magnetic cards - yes, THAT old). but that wouldnt' work for you since I think they want to avoid you having STORED hints or notes in there. I bet that's their point.

just find one with no memory. like an old hp25 that doesn't have text (old old LED style).
They don't mind it having memory. Just as long as we can't type text. (it is the Civil Engineering Seismic Design PE exam).... As long as we just store numbers and not text.

An old HP25... :D


I was hoping for something a little newer. :)
 

·
Retired PassatWorld Staff
Joined
·
6,165 Posts
there are quite a few TI's that have no additional memory or IR, and will fo RPN.

... and they don't speak the 'backward-polish' that the HP's do :)... which may be bad for you if you're used to it :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
pass-variant said:
there are quite a few TI's that have no additional memory or IR, and will fo RPN.

... and they don't speak the 'backward-polish' that the HP's do :)... which may be bad for you if you're used to it :lol:
What do you mean... they "will fo RPN"? I want it to have RPN "backward-polish" as you call it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,574 Posts
HalfGreek said:
An old HP25... :D


I was hoping for something a little newer. :)
Oh my gosh! I had one of those in high school & college. I loved that thing! I'm gonna have to head over to E-Bay and pick one up -- for old times sake! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
HalfGreek said:
Like maybe an HP32.
That's what I was thinking.

But I must ask, is keying in operators and operands using postfix notation really that much quicker compared to infix? When I was in engineering school I used both a postfix calculator (HP48SX) and an infix one (TI-85, which I bought when I lost the HP :oops: ). I didn't find the TI to be notably slower than the HP for basic arithmetic and algebraic expressions, though the HP had superior programmability and expandability. Ditto with quick calculations on our Sun workstations using dc (postfix) and bc (infix). :lol:
And now in business school, I have a postfix HP12c, but again, using a TI-30 is just as quick for arithmetic and for stuff like PV, NPV, etc.
I will admit that obviating the need for parentheses with postfix makes certain expressions easier to understand, but beyond that I think a cheap Casio infix scientific calculator would work just fine for your exam.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top