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2003 Passat GLS 1.8T Sedan
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I hope this is the right place to post this question.

Today I finally decided to start the big job on my 2003 B5.5 1.8T, and the main part of it would be the timing belt.
So, as this is the first time I'm doing it, I decided to take the long route and remove the radiator support panel so I'd have a lot of room to work and not struggle in that super tight space.

The problem was that after I was going to remove the radiator lower hose, I noticed that there is two transmission lines that go onto the radiator, and also I couldn't get the lower hose did off so I unplugged it from the thermostat and the coolant reservoir.

My question is: how do I (or should I) remove the transmission lines?

I attached some pictures, I noticed I could probably get it off on the bottom or on the radiator on the top.

I tried looking up, but on the videos I would find the cars wouldn't have these lines going onto the radiator.

Newbie in real need of help here. I frustrated and gave up for the day, but decided to ask for help.
 

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Search "service position."
In a nutshell, you remove the bumper cover and then what's left, including the transmission cooler, slides out several inches to give you (just enough) room to work. (You have to support it on rods; there's a place for them.) The transmission cooler (and other things) stay connected so you don't break in to the transmission.
 

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I suggest you do as FrescoGreen01.5 suggested.

But if you are going to disconnect the oil cooler hoses, do it at the other end of the flexible hoses
where the join to the hard pipes. You will need to top up the ATF when you put it back together.

When checking ATF level.
1. Car must be level.
2. Engine must be running.
3. ATF temp should be 35-45° C. (95-113° F)
4. Fill plug must be installed before switching the engine off.

ATF & Filter change. http://www.taligentx.com/passat/maintenance/atfchange/[/URL
 

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+1 for just sliding it out. There is plenty of room once you do. If you don't intend on doing a transmission fluid and filter change at the same time, I would not crack open those lines.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
That’s good to know guys!

I don’t wanna mess up with the transmission fluid for now, so I’ll only slide it out.

I had to put it back together because I didn’t have enough time to complete and had to move the car. So probably by the end of the month I should have it done.

I have another question tho: what would you recommend to remove both the camshaft and crankshaft bolts? I’m replacing both seals and I tried breaking it loose but figured without power tools it would be almost impossible haha so I’m looking to buy an impact wrench, just not sure which one/how much torque is needed.
 

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I suggest that you do NOT replace the crankshaft or camshaft seals, unless they are leaking or you have to remove them for another reason.
If you remove the crankshaft bolt, you will need to replace it with a new bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, I know the camshaft seals are leaking pretty bad. I couldn’t really see if the crankshaft seal was leaking too but I got the new bolts and all because I think this would be the best moment to replace them. Because I don’t wanna do this again if the crank seal starts leaking haha
 

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Check this post on what is involved with the crank seal My Big Turbo 1.8T 4Motion Passat Build Thread
I don't know for sure but I imagine it would be a bit harder with the engine in the car vs on a stand but either way, it's not a trivial task to replace the crank bolt and the seal behind it. Hopefully that is OK. Cam seals are much easier and if you haven't already bought them, I have a supply I've accumulated from TB kits that include them that I have never used. PM if you want a couple.
 

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If your seals are all leaking, I suggest an overhaul of the PCV system. If it's not working properly, the new seals will go bad too.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, I’ve got the PCV valve, suction pump, and the breather hose. There are pretty bad leaks around the valve and the breather tube.

I’ve also got a new valve cover gasket and timing chain tensioner + gasket and the half moon seal (which is also leaking badly).

I really want to do the crank seal just for the peace of mind. I saw the tutorial lowegian sent and they have the same approach as the ECS pdf guide says, to make that crankshaft holder with a piece of metal, and if it’s “”””just that”””” I wouldn’t mind going the extra mile to give this car some love it hasn’t had in years. What do you think/recommend?
 

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concur with keeping the transmission lines in tack ,the transmission cooler is integral with the radiator so to be safe you should/would disconnect them at the bottom drivers side where they transition from the flex (rubber) to the hard pipes....(your first picture)...here is the rub, since they are at the bottom,exposed to rusting (maybe not in Virginia) when loosening they tend to twist the radiator side hard pipes, creating future leaks, mark them if you must do them as Bentley manual is really hard to decipher without a magnifying glass.....as a sidebar to this if tranny has not been serviced or you do not know the history it might no be a bad time to do it.
 

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According to my Haynes manual.
Crankshaft drive sprocket bolt tension.
Step one. 66 ft-lbs (90 Nm)
Step two.Tighten an additional 90 degrees (1/4 turn)

I noticed in that write-up, it stated 74 ft-lbs plus 1/4 turn. Make sure to get it right.
 
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