Volkswagen Passat Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,449 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This discussion is going to use American references since I happen to be a citizen of the USA.

My recent switch to a Ford car has got me thinking about things that I/we purchase and how that truely relates to helping your country's cause. Even though my car is assembled in Mexico I said to myself "at least the profits stay back home".

So here's the question. Is it more beneficial to buy a product that was
A) assembled in US by (presumably) US workers but the profits go to a foreign company or
B) assembled in a foreign country but the profits come back to a US company?

With evertying that is going on the world I'd like to see myself being a buyer or more goods and services that benefit my country. But sometimes I wonder if I'm really doing any good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
Roger Simmermaker, author of "How Americans can buy American" asserts that (B) is preferable: in his words, "The part of the 'Buy American' picture that is most overlooked, but is actually the most important, is ownership."
http://www.howtobuyamerican.com/ba-book-1stchapter.shtml

On the other hand, my personal opinion is that buying the products and services that offer the best value to you is the most patriotic thing to do with your hard earned U.S. dollars, regardless of their origin or the location of the parent company. I do agree with Simmermaker that the only truly "American" (referring to the USA, not the continents) cars are GM and Ford vehicles assembled in the U.S., though. Even then, there may significant contributions from foreign subsidiaries, suppliers, or contractors, so maybe it's pointless to try classifying.

An interesting question- which of these are American companies: 7-Eleven, Food Lion, A&P, CompUSA, Dunkin Donuts, Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream, Motel 6, Sea-Doo watercraft?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
this is just me, but i prefer to buy "made in america" (passat notwithstanding...wife's car when new, that's what she wanted so that's what we got).

the way i look at it, regardless of where "the money goes to the parent company", if it was made in america, i know that the money i spent paid wages to american workers to feed their families. to me, that's what matters.

ymmv.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,441 Posts
Globalism makes this all very fuzzy. Many "American" companies now have nearly their entire operations overseas or south/north of the border. When possible, I do try to buy goods grown/ manufactured/ assembled in the USA by domestically held companies, preferrably even individuals. But cars are a good exception. Some Toyotas and Hondas are more American made (parts included) than many Fords and GMs. Given Toyota N.America manufacturing is headquartered in my home town, it certainly seems more loyal to purchase a Toyota (I did give them more than a fair shake each time I went to buy. Last car I bought was a Ohio made Honda 60% domestic sourced.).

If you look at the whole supply chain before it gets to corporate HQ, a "foriegn" car made domestically with domestic parts (in some cases designed domestically as well), would seem to drop more dollars into the hands of Americans.

1. American owned/American made
2. American owned/Foreign made
3. Foreign owned/American made
4. Foreign owned/Foreign made
I'd invert 2 & 3 personally. Simmermaker's argument that corporate profits are taxed in the country of origin ignores that employee's salaries and property are taxed domestically. There is a reason Kentucky, Ohio, Alabama, etc. were all offering huge incentives to Hyundai to locate in their state. Simmermaker also must then accept with his argument that jobless Americans will need to tax domestic companies more to pay for a socialist - er - welfare state. That will in turn drive their need to cut cost and further off-shore jobs.

Of course, regardless of where its made, ultimately one has to consider quality and price. My patriotism and wallet have their limits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,407 Posts
I too am one to probably go with B.

I figure with how global most companies are these days, I really can't tell where my money is going in the company.

But if my car was built in the USA, I know my money went to pay the workers who assembled it.

-Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
psm0110 said:
Simmermaker's argument that corporate profits are taxed in the country of origin ignores that employee's salaries and property are taxed domestically.
Excellent point, psm0110. My home state of Indiana has the third highest concentration of Japanese companies in the U.S. (not to mention many companies based in other foreign countries), and I'm sure the Indiana Department of Revenue is quite happy to receive tax payments (property, inventory, etc.) from these companies and the thousands of Hoosiers who work for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Interesting, I'd rather have foreign made cars anyday, simply from my experience they tend to be better made than their U.S. counterparts. As for ownership, I'd prefer foreign ownership (versus buying GM's Saab, Ford's Jaguar, etc..), because those companies seem to be more in line with my enviro views than GM/Ford. (see Suburban, Expedition, ...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,449 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
evacboy said:
Interesting, I'd rather have foreign made cars anyday, simply from my experience they tend to be better made than their U.S. counterparts. As for ownership, I'd prefer foreign ownership (versus buying GM's Saab, Ford's Jaguar, etc..), because those companies seem to be more in line with my enviro views than GM/Ford. (see Suburban, Expedition, ...)
you've allowed product preferences to come in the way of "doing what is best for your country". i should have said "assume your passat is either made in the us or manufactured by a company that resides in the US".

But I would possibly agree with you on the enviro part. However, I think just because all the Euros don't have big cars and use diesel more effectively than the US, I think that's out of pure economic reality since their gas isn't as cheap as ours (we subsidize the fuel in other ways that the Euros don't) and we have much more wide-open cities compared to the Euros.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
I buy the best product at the best price, regardless of where it is made. If Chrysler wants me to buy their car, make a better car.

That being said, the way to look at it is where you buy the goods from. Did you order it from another country or buy in the US. Where you buy it is what will have the biggest economic impact.

MADE IN THE USA had become a joke label. For the most part if you investigate you will find that the parts are from other countries and only the final assembly happens in the US. This is the cheapest part of the production and usually only fulfills low paying jobs. Look at the US parts content if you want to buy in the US.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,730 Posts
I'm trying more and more to buy things made in America that simply don't matter to me, take vitamins for example. I mean you throw the things down your throat and you crap them out so why not buy an American brand? I know that Centrum is an American brand and One-A-Day's come from Germany so I buy the Centrum's - well that and I don't see the difference. Now if I found out that Centrum was a corrupt company, they were screwing their employees over or they did something illegal or unethical, I'd use One-A-Day brand. I honestly don't see the difference otherwise but if I did, I'd buy the other brand.

To me it's the same for drinking water, I pee it out like everyone else - so I'll pee out American bottled water. Soap - I could care less about "brands". Seriously, I just don't give a damn about all this or that and so since Coast is an American brand that I would buy just like any other brand and I like the smell, it cleans just as well as anything else and leaves just as much soap scum as a non-American brand I buy it. I honestly can't get excited about soap, water, vitamins, razor blades or anything like that. If one is just as good as another and I don't have a preference - I'll buy the American brand unless the American brand is crummy, if the soap doesn't do it's job, if the razors are inferior, if the water tastes bad - I'll switch.

Stuff I do care about, like the car for example, I will continue to purchase items I do prefer over other brands like everyone should. I mean if you prefer one brand of drinking water over another, I see nothing wrong with buying it then. But if you honestly don't care - I don't see why you wouldn't buy the American made brand. Make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Sullie,

Yah, I mostly agree with you here. It's just that stuff I don't care about (water, soap, blah blah), I'll just buy whatever's either cheapest or I know works the best (e.g. mach 3 razors, e.g.). I don't really look at country of origin of these items...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,721 Posts
there was an interesting article in the NYtimes magazine a couple of weeks ago about the difference in salary of the CEO and the average salary of the emplyees.

In countries that are generally considered corrupt the difference was 50 times. I think Brazil was tops there, most european countries the diff was something like 25 times.

The USA was 550. As long as CEOs in the USA think their salaries are that much more important than keeping jobs in America, or paying working americans a decent wage, I think you do America a greater favor by buying out of country products. (and yes I think a corporations taxes should be based on the difference in wages betwix the top and the bottom. If a CEO wants to help his company, he'll take a pay cut. Or outsource managment to India. :p :roll: :lol: )

just two cents from the anti american pinko commie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,753 Posts
I was made in America by Americans, by Gawd!!!!!

(even have "made in the USA" tattooed on my back side)

Seriously, Wal-mart's pressure to keep lowering prices has led to many jobs going over seas or south of the border.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,468 Posts
Lol,..really who knows for sure where the money goes. Even if the CEO, executives who get most of the $$ don't cheat on their taxes, I'm not so sure the gov't would spend it wisely anyway or lose it through some bureacratic blunder. Sooner or later, prob most of the factories will be outsourced or fully mechanized. I'm not so sure if I purchased an American car, it would do much good to America anyhow. I'd rather measure my patriotism in another way, and just buy whatever car I want regardless. :beer:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,574 Posts
raneek said:
[...] my personal opinion is that buying the products and services that offer the best value to you is the most patriotic thing to do with your hard earned U.S. dollars, regardless of their origin or the location of the parent company.
I agree. Why? Because when you do this you maximize your personal wealth, which increases (however imperceptably) the national wealth.
 

·
Rogue Assassin
Joined
·
2,977 Posts
Exactly what makes it "patriotic" to purchase products "made in the USA?" Just more silly, misplaced neo-patriotism, if you ask me. :roll: But, then again, this "anti-American SOB" views nationalism (and, therefore, misplaced & misguided patriotism) as far more evil than ignoring where something is manufactured.

I figure if my conservative, nationalistic friends think I should buy American to support our economy and country, while my liberal, union-supporting, socialist-thinking friends think I should buy American to keep our union workers employed while keeping foreign workers from being exploited, the truth must be somewhere else.

So I'm just going to keep looking for good products at good prices, regardless of their nation of manufacture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,449 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
if you had the choice for two products, exactly the same (price, quality, etc) where one is manufactured abroad and the other manufactured locally...which do you choose? does it make no difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,105 Posts
Does anyone have a source to look up the orgin of where a particular vehicle is assembled and where the parts come from?

I have a friend who is looking into buying a car and he tends towards the "Buy American" stance. So I want to be able to show he some facts on where certain cars are assembled.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top