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Discussion Starter #1
I have done brakes plenty of times before but man on man these rears on my 03 Passat are a pain. After finally removing everything I needed to remove I am having a hard time getting the caliper back on. I have used a c-clamp to retract the cyinder but I am not sure if it is in all of the way because it is a very tight fit. Any suggestions? I am on a time limit….thanks everyone in advance.
 

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4th Gear (Wax on Wax off)
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The piston doesn't just push in it turns as you push .. there is a tool for it and I understand Auto Zone rents it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When do I know that it is in far enough? It appears to be in as far as it will go but it is a really really tight fit. Thanks btw.
 

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You only have to push it in far enough to put the new pads on and get the caliper assembly into place. If you used a C-clamp and didn't turn the piston while retracted the rears, you may have hosed your emergency brake. That piston is threaded so it can work as a cable operated emergency brake. Most rear discs do something like this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You only have to push it in far enough to put the new pads on and get the caliper assembly into place. If you used a C-clamp and didn't turn the piston while retracted the rears, you may have hosed your emergency brake. That piston is threaded so it can work as a cable operated emergency brake. Most rear discs do something like this.
I honestly thought that i did get it in far enough but it was way to snug when trying to fit over my new pads. Explain retracted the rears part please. I usually just push the piston back in and slide on the brakes and everything is cool. Do you really think I messed something up?
 

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you need to turn the piston while you push it in, the piston is treaded for the e-brake, if you dont turn the piston while it is moving in than you most likely screwed it up,

you really need this tool clicky clicky this allows for turning and pushing in one move, i use this tool all the time and it take maybe 10 seconds to do eash caliper including setup of the tool in the caliper
 

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From here: http://www.2carpros.com/how_to/rear_brake_pads.htm It's not a VW but it's the same style.


Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
you need to turn the piston while you push it in, the piston is treaded for the e-brake, if you dont turn the piston while it is moving in than you most likely screwed it up,

you really need this tool clicky clicky this allows for turning and pushing in one move, i use this tool all the time and it take maybe 10 seconds to do eash caliper including setup of the tool in the caliper
I am on my way to get the tool. I love the 10 second part after how long I spent lol. Thanks a lot....I am learning tha way of the Passat.
 

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If you used a C-Clamp on the rear caliper without properly twisting the piston in, you have successfully destroyed your rear calipers.

The rear piston must be turned as it is pushed in. If not you will destroy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I started out :banghead: but finished :thumbup: lol.

So this was such a nice learning experience lol. I ended up renting that tool at a local Auto Zone since for some odd reason it was free even though I didn't buy anything there. Since my passenger rear was almost done it was a piece of cake to retract the piston another couple 1/16's of an inch. Then bang bang bang and it was done. I proceeded to do the drivers side rear and wouldn't you know it....that tool got stuck in between the piston and the caliper (feel free to laugh now). I am not quite sure how it happened but after some time I did manage to free it. This rotor came off very easy though. Then bang bang bang and it was done. I tested them and despite my worries about damaging my one brake by using a c-clamp it seems to be working fine.

I also replaced my sparks with NGK's, replaced the pollen filter, and replaced the air filter. The screen that leads into the air filter was a mess! I think that I dug a whole tree out of there. I am amazed that it got any air at all with all the crap in there. I plan to stay more on top of these things in the future. We had a little one shortly after I bought my car so time was very limited while I got used to the time our new bundle of joy required. I am sure that more questions will come shortly but thanks a lot everyone. I actually called my dad to thank him lol. He was a machinist for 28 years and taught me that I can do anything if I want to. Funny...a car job turning into a life lesson lol. Thanks again.
 

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That's great news. I've gone from being very confident with oil changes, valve cover replacment, and custom bracket making to cylinder head removal and installation, timing belt replacement, turbo replacement, custom exhaust, custom oil breather, tuning, fueling, and cleaning the bay up of un-necessary junk. I hope to reach 230whp on a motor that was 150bhp at the crank only 8 months ago.
 

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I think I covered it after all my calipers are not broken.
you got lucky :p
i honestly wouldn't endorse this kind of method, or advertise it to other people out of fear as they may perform this and damage their dust boots that cover the piston, which will over time allow dust/debris in thereby destroying the caliper by wearing the side walls out and destroying the seals thus causing a loss of hydraulic pressure and a major safety hazard.

i don't mean to sound offensive in this phrasing.
the tool retracts on the face of the piston and NOT the sides of it for a reason.

do whatever method you want, but please be more careful in what you advertise to other people. not everyone may have the same skills as you do, and may seriously damage their property in such methods.

i'm sure that's happened to you once, right? did something that sounded kind of jerry-rigged and you broke on accident whatever it was you were working on? i'll admit to doing it, i know it sucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well it has been 3 days and i am happy to say that the brakes are working fine. Actually they work great and I wonder what the break in period is. I ended up going with Balo rotors and Akebono ceramic pads in the end. I appreciate everyone help here and I am glad that I didn't mess up anything lol.
 

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I don't mean to hijack this thread, but it seems as good a time to ask as any...
Why do the pistons have to be turned as they are retracted? I mean is there something inside the calipers that requires them to rotated. If they are like this http://www.circletrack.com/techarticles/ctrp_0612_brake_caliper_rebuild/photo_05.html couldn't they just be pressed in without twisting?

Maybe they have to be twisted to break the friction with the seal? If they are just pressed in could they drag/pull the seal out of position?

So my guess is that they don't need to be rotated any specific amount or direction, just as long as they are rotated.

Thanks,
davidk
 
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