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Hi all, I just replaced my VCG on my 03 passat 1.8t and I somehow forgot to put the little plastic oil splash guard things back in over the drivers side cam. Does anyone know if this is a necessary bit to be in there? It just kind of sits in there without anything holding it in and I’m wondering if it has any advantage or reason to be there. I’ll attach a pic of the part below.
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I don't know how crucial they are, but I would put them back in. The gasket should be fine, just clean and replace the sealant in the corners.
 

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The one and only 1.8 I did a rebuild on had those plastic things also. I don't remember all things about that motor but I'm under the impression it would help keep a good amount of oil from getting into the large vacuum hose that hooks up to the valve cover.

The V6 has a metal baffle on the underside of the valve cover. Is the 1.8 valve cover void of a baffle and that's why the plastic is used?
 

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I forgot those things on our 1.8T, found them sitting on the workbench after everything else was done. After giving some thought, I just stored them away until the next time the valve cover was off, years later.
 

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Not the first and won't be the last. I did it too. But, I put them back on. No harm.
 

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It's well known that car manufacturers put a lot of extra parts in there, just to get rid of them (GRIN). Especially on a German car, assume everything has a function, no matter how small.
 

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As mentioned earlier, they are to prevent fouling of your emissions system with oil splashing up and get sucked up in the system.
 
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IMO, They are critical part of the lubrication system.
They confine the oil on the cam, preventing it from splashing around.


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Been waiting for a post like this, now I don't feel so stupid. Mine are still out after the cam tensioner replacement. LOL

🤣 🤣
 

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It's well known that car manufacturers put a lot of extra parts in there, just to get rid of them (GRIN). Especially on a German car, assume everything has a function, no matter how small.
You have to weigh the pros/cons if there is a left-over item after finishing a job. One fender liner screw? Probably not a big deal. Connecting rod nut? Probably best to take the motor apart.
 

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You have to weigh the pros/cons if there is a left-over item after finishing a job. One fender liner screw? Probably not a big deal. Connecting rod nut? Probably best to take the motor apart.
Well, tell that to some mechanics. Not to pick on a brand - just the dealership.. The Kia / Hyundai / Nissan dealerships in Sydney, Cape Breton (all same owner) were known to glaze over the details... like when one person wanted a second opinion on the rattles they heard while driving their car so they brought it to Speedy Muffler. The mechanic called the police when he found out the mechanics only put 3 of the 16 transmission bolts back on the car - and only finger tight. It was literally just hanging there... He had NO idea how she was even able to drive it..
 
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At the risk of PassatWorld old timers having already heard this; my wife took her Honda Civic to the dealer she bought it from, due to fuel issue causing drivability problems. They sprayed oil on the clutch, then tried to convince her the car came in with a slipping clutch. Then we had an Audi which went to the dealer for a recall- replacement of the final drive gear oil. I picked it up assuming that they had actually put new gear oil in, after syphoning the old oil out. Since by chance there was a small amount of gear lube still in there, it took several months for the pinion bearing to break up and take out the transmission. Also had a Nissan which went in for a tune-up, but ran like crap two weeks later. The technician had left a distributor screw loose, and it fell out. The service writer was pissed at me for bringing the car back. This is why I work on my own stuff whenever possible.
 

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You have to weigh the pros/cons if there is a left-over item after finishing a job. One fender liner screw? Probably not a big deal. Connecting rod nut? Probably best to take the motor apart.
When I was 19 I took apart a New Process 435 - 4speed truck transmission because 3rd gear was completely gone. I bought a complete rebuild kit, put it all back together, bolted it back up to the rear of the engine (man that trans is friggin heavy) and wouldn't you know it. A lone thrust washer was left. I for the life of me couldn't figure out where that damn thing went. So I convinced myself I was correct with the re-assembly and it was an extra part in the kit.
After a few weeks of driving the truck, the input shaft seized up to the output shaft. The input shaft has a cup on one end, that thrust washer is supposed to go inside the cup and the snout end of the output shaft rides on that thrust washer. That couple dollar thrust washer not being installed cost me almost $800 in repairs
From that point on, any left over parts in my book is bad news.
 
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