Volkswagen Passat Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

anyone has manual/DIY instructions for servicing the rear brake caliper on the B6 Passat, with Electric Parking Brakes?

I need to change the caliper piston, seals.
Would be thankful for any tips.

Thank you in advance.
 

· Registered
2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
Joined
·
113 Posts
There are some posts on this thread linked below from myself and other users that you may find helpful. The video is Ross Tech's guide on PROPERLY retracting the piston of the EPB to prepare for caliper removal, etc. with VCDS which is the best scan/diagnostic tool available to get this done. It's pricier than others but it is by far the most capable and comprehensive.

Aside from the EPB it's pretty much a typical caliper rebuild job. If you've done these before then you'll be familiar with the rest, and the above info should help clear up the EPB part. If you need instructions on the rebuilding as well let me know.


http://www.passatworld.com/forums/v...ion/538305-schwaben-scan-tool-ecs-tuning.html



 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi and thank you a lot for replying.

Could you please send me the rebuilding instructions that you mentioned? :)

I read you experienced some tough times getting out the M14 triple-square bolts holding the carrier. Have you replaced them by new bolts when you put back the new caliper?

I plan to change the pistons and seals on my rear calipers. I noticed that one of the rear wheel / brake disc gets very hot when driving (driving for about 30 minutes). I suspect the piston from the rear caliper gets stuck and brake pads are pressing onto the rotors. I had same problem on one of the front wheels, problem was solved by installing new caliper. For the rear wheels, I want only to change piston and seals on caliper, because to get a new whole caliper with EPB, that is expensive.
 

· Registered
2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
Joined
·
113 Posts
Hi and thank you a lot for replying.

Could you please send me the rebuilding instructions that you mentioned? :)
Sure, I'd be happy to. You're right the calipers with the EPB motor attached are crazy expensive and it's unfortunate you can't buy them separately. Rebuilding them is one of the ways I would do it at well, but before we discuss the rebuilding process let's discuss the other ways you could go; I've never been to Norway so I don't know if you have a lot of junk yards there or not but if you do you could call some local junk yards and see if they have any B6 their and assess based on mileage and condition whether you think the calipers are probably good and take one or both at a fraction of what you'd spend on the new ones. You could also use a VW forum to look for B6 Passats posted for part out, although it may be hit or miss as far as where they are located. Either way would prove to be very cheap and would be easier than doing a rebuild.

I read you experienced some tough times getting out the M14 triple-square bolts holding the carrier. Have you replaced them by new bolts when you put back the new caliper?
Yes I absolutely replaced the bolts with new ones and I also used anti-seize on the new ones. While it's not typical practice to use anti-seize on these sort of bolts I deemed it a good idea considering how ridiculously corroded they can get. There is no way in hell I wanted to go through what I went through the last time again the next time I need to remove those caliper carriers. If you're just doing a rebuild for the calipers you won't need to remove the caliper carrier. The caliper and caliper carrier and individual pieces and the caliper can be removed independently and then disconnected from the EPB motor and brake line to get it off the car completely. The only reason to remove the caliper carrier is if you are changing rotors at the same time (which is probably a good idea though). Be prepared for a fight with those bolts!

I plan to change the pistons and seals on my rear calipers. I noticed that one of the rear wheel / brake disc gets very hot when driving (driving for about 30 minutes). I suspect the piston from the rear caliper gets stuck and brake pads are pressing onto the rotors. I had same problem on one of the front wheels, problem was solved by installing new caliper. For the rear wheels, I want only to change piston and seals on caliper, because to get a new whole caliper with EPB, that is expensive.
Yes that is absolutely a sign of a sticking piston, you're on the right track.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi,

That can be an option to get a second-hand caliper from a junk yard. We have some junk yards here in Norway. I might call one nearby and check.
I am also planning to change the brake rotors. They look really worn out, and I would like to change them when I will do the job on calipers.

I have a couple of more questions :)

- When you dismounted the rear caliper carrier - have you lifted the car up (or perhaps you did it over a "service hole" - not sure what is the correct name for it :)), so you got enough space underneath the car to use the breaker bar? I have only some garage supports, but I am unsure I will get enough space under the car to unscrew those bolts.

- After installing the new brake pads, what kind of tool one should use to push back the caliper piston (to get more space to fit thicker pads)? Is it enough to only push back the piston, or the piston must be screwed and pushed back.

Thank you very much for all the support.

 

· Registered
2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
Joined
·
113 Posts
That can be an option to get a second-hand caliper from a junk yard. We have some junk yards here in Norway. I might call one nearby and check.
I am also planning to change the brake rotors. They look really worn out, and I would like to change them when I will do the job on calipers.
Yeah sounds like a good idea to change those rotors out. Very easy once the caliper carriers are off. My best advice for the carrier bolts is to make sure you have PB Blaster (a penetrating lubricant that you will use on the bolts prior to removing), a good 1.5 - 2 foot (half-meter) long breaker bar, and you might even wind up needing a propane torch like I did. You're going to spray the bolt with PB blaster and let it penetrate. If you get a propane torch you will then heat cycle the bolt so that the PB blaster can penetrate even further. After letting it soak a bit you will then take your M14 triple square bit into the bolt head and a hammer in the other hand and wack the the other end of the M14 triple square socket straight on. What you're doing is shocking the bolt which should help to loosen it and the corrosion up a bit before you even try to turn it. Then you're read to hook up your breaker bar and give it a whirl. Attempt to use force with one hand on the top end of the breaker bar to keep the triple square seated perfectly in the bolt head and then use your other hand to pull as much leverage on the very end of the breaker bar as possible. You may need to use both hands on the very end since the bolts are so hard to loosen but if you keep a VERY close eye on that triple square and bolt head because with all that force the triple square will try to unseat depending on the angle you are leveraging from with the breaker bar. Also make sure your breaker bar is good quality. I shit you not, my breaker bar almost snapped towards the top end. If your breaker bar is cheap it may snap and that could really mess you or whatever it hits up. Like me, you may find that even a long breaker bar is not enough, in which case you should have a "cheater bar" ready too. This is basically just an extra 2 ft or so length of metal piping. You can buy something like this at most any auto parts store or muffler shop. It's meant for exhaust systems but you're using it as to put over the end of your breaker bar to extend it and get more leverage. It took me both to crack my bolts lose and I still barely got them. I almost gave up, it was ridiculous. I have an impact wrench too and that thing didn't do a damn thing to the bolt... Just be ready for a struggle. With any luck yours won't be as bad as mine...

When you dismounted the rear caliper carrier - have you lifted the car up (or perhaps you did it over a "service hole" - not sure what is the correct name for it ), so you got enough space underneath the car to use the breaker bar? I have only some garage supports, but I am unsure I will get enough space under the car to unscrew those bolts.
I did mine in my garage too, no service hole or lift. Just used a floor jack (picture below) and "garage supports" (what I call jack stands). With a proper floor jack like the one below rated for more than the weight of the vehicle and capable for 18" (45cm) of lift I was able to get plenty of room under the back and of the car to work with. It certainly wasn't as idea as if I had the car on an automotive lift like a shop would but it worked. Being that it was just lifted 18" of the floor it the angles I could use with the breaker bar were limited but it wasn't that bad, it was just how tight those bolts were that was bad.

https://www.harborfreight.com/3-ton...vy-duty-floor-jack-with-rapid-pump-61253.html

Again, you'll want a floor jack like the one above to get the right amount of lift. I don't think the cheap factory jack included in the trunk of your VW will get the car high enough to be ideal. If you get a floor jack like below I recommend a jack pad to go on the metal lifting surface of the jack and the car. Also make sure you lift it from the right location for jacking up from the rear end. The location is picture below, it will look like that but it won't have the larger black knob, it will just have two of the smaller looking one on the left.

https://www.google.com/search?q=b6+...UICygC&biw=1920&bih=947#imgrc=buT-NdghrFTlpM:

That is where you put the floor jack. But the "garage support" as you called it will of course go along the reinforced frame rail as I'm sure you know. Obviously wheel chocks are recommended for the front wheels to be extra safe.



After installing the new brake pads, what kind of tool one should use to push back the caliper piston (to get more space to fit thicker pads)? Is it enough to only push back the piston, or the piston must be screwed and pushed back.
Yes, in fact you ONLY want to PUSH the piston back for these particular calipers. A lot of cars have calipers that require you to wind/screw the piston back in with a special tool, but these calipers are not designed like that. If you were to try to screw them back you'd damage them. You absolutely ONLY want to push these pistons straight back using a tool like the one picture below, or just a large C-clamp (also pictured below). Just be sure to put one of the old brake pads between the one end of the spreader/clamp and the piston face itself to protect the piston. When retracting the piston you MUST open the brake fluid reservoir. When you retract the piston your are increasing pressure within the brake system and it needs an escape so open the brake fluid reservoir and put a rage around the top because a bit of fluid may come out (usually it doesn't though in my experience). When that is all done, assuming you did remove the bad sticking caliper and put a good one in then you will have disconnected that bad caliper from the brake line and you then must bleed the brakes and use new fluid. I assume you already knew this but just being thorough. There are plenty of DIYs on VWVortex on how to do this. You can do it the manual way which requires a helper or you can do it with a powerbleeder. You'll hear some people say powerbleeders don't do a good job but I call bullshit on that personally. I've used them maaany times with no issues and my brake system is way upgraded from the stock brake system, I'd know if the powerbleeder was bad. There are also some very little known risks to manual bleeding on more modern cars. They are uncommon and not really worth getting into, but my point is that I'd recommend the powerbleeder route. It is easier and safer as long as you don't pressurize the system over like 12PSI or so to be safe.

A couple things to note. Be very careful with the smaller weak screws involved in the job. Most notably the small little set screw for the rotor and the bolts that bolt the EPB motor to the back of the caliper. These sort of bolts can shear very easily and you don't want that to happen.

Also, don't forget to thoroughly clean and lube the two caliper slide pins with quality high-temp silicone grease and replace the boots with new ones.

Caliper spreader:
https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p...WxI0Ni3cwOiMMOgrRTRoC9FEQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

C-clamp:
BESSEY 1 in. Drop Forged C-Clamp with 1 in. Throat Depth-CM10 - The Home Depot

Power-bleeder:
https://www.ecstuning.com/b-schwabe...gOuw0UgiSWIu2OMSLc3rnK1MQJovzJIBoCEJwQAvD_BwE
 

· Registered
2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
Joined
·
113 Posts
Actually, I just got to thinking about something else when I mentioned the caliper slide pins above... before you dive into this whole project and assume the piston itself is sticking, you may want to check and make sure that the slide pins haven't gone completely dry and/or seized up. Checking this is as simple as raising the car a bit, removing the wheel, and unbolting the slide pins from the back of the caliper (they are the ones that connect the caliper and the caliper carrier). If they have seized up (usually a result of a bad dust boot) they can interfere with proper caliper performance. I should have thought to mention that sooner...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi and thank you for all you advices :)
I have completed the rear brake job. I think the problem was in those calipers. The caliper pistons was completely seizes. Could not move them in/out even when the calipers where dismounted.

I installed new brake discs, new brake pads and a pair of overhauled calipers.
I was pretty lucky with those triple-square bolts that hold the caliper carrier. I used plenty of WD40, and some extension bars with wobble. It took some effort under the car to find a proper position to unscrew them, but it went fine in the end. I bleeded the brake system with the help of a friend. Pumping with the pedal :)

Thanks again for you replies and greetings from Norway!

Dumitru.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top