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Discussion Starter #1
I don’t know if this the right one I need to be in but it’s a Passat page. I’m currently working on a 2001 vw 2.8 v6. I’m going to be completely honest I got into this without knowing I needed special tools. I have since gotten the car in time. But I can’t figure out why it won’t start now. There is the plastic line that goes across the front of motor I had gotten a new hoses where can I find the piece that’s missing?
98302
 

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I have since gotten the car in time.
Do you mean you have done the timing belt or that the timing was off and now you have fixed that issue?

There is the plastic line that goes across the front of motor I had gotten a new hoses where can I find the piece that’s missing?
If you got new PCV hoses, what piece are you looking for?

2.8L PCV system:
and before you complain about the photobucket images (for chrome):
 

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it started out a the little circle gasket that’s behind the crank. I tore it apart without have the special tools. So now I had the car that was out of time because I didn’t have special tools. I had gotten everything back in time to best of my knowledge. It’s the price that comes off back of block.
 

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The rear main seal was replaced or was it the front main seal? Did you crank the motor when it was not timed?
 

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That's a lot of stuff piled on that motor! I prefer to put that stuff on a workbench so nothing gets lost.

The concern here is that you got into a job that you weren't prepared for, and maybe damaged the engine. Someone who is very familiar with the 2.8 could change a front seal and get it back together, in a pinch, without the cam holding tools, but even then it is risky. How did you get the belt back on so the cams were correctly timed to the crank?
 

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How was the crank held to loosen and tighten the crank bolt? If the crank moved under torque from the wrench, you could still have bent some valves. I would start with a compression test to see if that is the case. The V6 is also susceptible to flooding, so be sure to pull the fuse for the fuel pump when cranking. If the compression is good, it may simply be flooded, so new plugs, air out the cylinder, fix the PCV vacuum leak and it should start. Sometimes starting fluid is required after the engine is flooded as well as a battery charger.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
How was the crank held to loosen and tighten the crank bolt? If the crank moved under torque from the wrench, you could still have bent some valves. I would start with a compression test to see if that is the case. The V6 is also susceptible to flooding, so be sure to pull the fuse for the fuel pump when cranking. If the compression is good, it may simply be flooded, so new plugs, air out the cylinder, fix the PCV vacuum leak and it should start. Sometimes starting fluid is required after the engine is flooded as well as a battery charger.
Where do you spray it at?
 

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Into the intake snorkel at the leading edge of the hood.
 

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First things first: verify that the cams are correctly timed with respect to the crank. Revolve the crankshaft by a socket on the crankshaft pulley bolt, until the groove on the pulley rim lines up with the arrow mark on the plastic belt cover. Now look carefully at the metal plates on the front of each cam sprocket, which have two holes in each. All four holes need to be perfectly in line. If not, the timing is not correct.
 
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