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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone,

I'm wondering if anyone could help me with some information,

The valve stem seals on my 2001 Passat need replacing, like many owners of a car this age the cost of the repair at a garage far outweighs the value of the car, I generally look after the car myself unless it requires specialist knowledge or equipment that I don't have.

I'm trying to find out if they can be replaced diy style using compressed air or paracord.

I've spend a lot of time searching both on google and forums, and although there are numerous threads covering this I can't seem to find anything relating to the 2.0 AZM engine specifically.

Does anybody know if it is possible to carry it out on this engine using the above method and without removing the cylinder head?

Many thanks,

Darren.
 

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Never have worked on a 2.0, but seeing as the head is somewhat similar to the 1.8's and 2.8's here in the states, doing valve stem seals is a bummer of a job.
It requires a valve spring compressor that has exceptionally long "fingers" that can reach down inside the cam follower bore(s) to compress the valve assembly.
The valve keepers are relatively small and are quite challenging to remove and even more so to re-assemble.

FCP Euro has a valve spring compression tool for around $100 U.S. I don't know how good it works. Looks as though it would be cumbersome, to me anyways.
Every shop that I know of has a custom tool that locks on a bar so they can get the keepers in and out effectively. Which means the tool is locked so they don't have to keep holding it, then they can use both hands with long pick like instruments to mess around with those pesky valve keepers.

I don't know how many grooves are on the 2.0L valves, but here in the states our valves have 3 grooves on them. It's quite a challenge to get those keepers in the right way.

I do almost everything myself to my VW's but this is one thing I refuse to do. For $40 U.S. my local machine shop will disassemble and re-assemble a pair of 2.8L heads.
That $40 allows me to keep my sanity. Something that becomes more of a value as I get older.

Unless you have a valve stem seal removal tool, removing them without the tool usually turns into more labor. The removal tool grabs the whole seal and removes it without coming apart.
Using a screwdriver or other sort pry tool usually results in the stem seal coming apart and leaving part of the seal left on the valve guide. Which obviously causes issues for the new stem seals.
Installing the stem seals properly requires the installation tool.
I own the Genuine VW/Audi removal tool and installation tool, it makes easy work of it all, but still extreme care must be taken so the stem seals don't leak after re-assembly.
The stem seal has a very small lip on it, if the seal is not installed properly, the seal may not be seated properly (not snapped on and straight) on the end of the valve guide, and when the valves are pushed through the new stem seal the keeper grooves can very easily cut the stem seal lip, causing it to leak.

I'm a huge proponent of doing as much as you can by yourself, but removal and the re-assembly of the valves, I just bite the bullet and take the whole head to local shop and have them do just that portion of it.
 

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I've done it on a 1.8t, quite involved obviously. Had it removed, though, and worked on the bench. Made my own compressing tool that bolted to the head, but had a helping hand keeping it compressed while trying to put the keeper halves into their slots. Some would go in so easily, some would just not cooperate. Stems came with plastic guides to assist installation and prevent damage while pushing them over the valves. L1030350.jpg
It's been six years, so I can't remember exactly, but I think it took at least a couple of days to disassemble the head (after it was removed from the block), clean the valves, and reinstall everything with new seals. That's not counting numerous hours reading and learning. I can't imagine working on it while the head is on the block. Even working on the bench was difficult and tedious, where I had plenty of space, and could sit on a stool while working. Was very satisfying completing it! Six years later, no oil loss, nor smoking, the engine is running great. Not really trying to encourage, nor discourage you from doing anything. Everything is doable, of course. And AndreasPassat made several great points. Plenty of opportunity to do something wrong. Bad thing is, you may not even know until you crank the engine. But then, doing something for the second time usually goes much faster than the first time! :rolleyes::wrench:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Guys,

Thank you both for your replies I really appreciate it.

From what you say it does look like a job I can't do myself :S However it never occurred to me to remove the head myself and take that along to the local garage, that would save me a ton of money in labour!

My other concern is hoping that's where the problem lies, I'm 99% certain it is but the only thing that concerns me is that the plug in number 4 cylinder has considerably more oil fouling than the other 3, I don't know you know when you have something niggling in the back of your mind? :lol:

I have been thinking about the oil scrapers but I can't understand why this would only effect number 4, I guess I'm only going to find out by taking the head off. (or at least eliminate the valve seals)

I'm getting to the point where I may consider constructing some kind of harness that's supports a 10 gallon drum attached to the side of the car, feeding oil directly into the sump the amount it's consuming at the minute, I could roll down the window and top it up on long journeys :lol:

Anyway guys once again thank you very much and I'll report back with my decision :)

Darren.
 

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Well, if your consuming oil at that rate, I'm pretty certain it'll be the oil control rings on the pistons that need replacing.
Bad valve stem seals will result in heavy smoke out the tail pipe at start up, but then disappear after a short while.
Continual smoke out the tail pipe and or excessive oil consumption is related to the oil control rings on the pistons.
My guess is that your #4 cylinder piston either has a broken or stuck (or even both) oil control ring(s). By stuck I mean that the ring(s) is/are stuck inside the groove on the piston and it can't expand against the cylinder wall to keep the oil from passing by.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't have any smoke on startup, but once the engine is warm I do have smoke when idling for over a minute, which is pretty much the opposite of what you're saying which leads me to think you're confirming my niggling thought :(

There's a big puff of it when I pull away then everything is as normal whilst driving along, however when idling the engine shudders and under acceleration occasionally misfires.

I can't see anything other than a strip down to confirm this, I'm pretty sure a compression test wouldn't do me any good, are there any other test I could carry out that you know of?

Many thanks,

Darren.
 

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Pour about 10-15cc of Seafoam into cylinder #4 after removing the spark plug. Allow the Seafoam to weep down into that ring pack (over 5-6 hours) so the rings can move freely and function properly once again.:cool: To make sure all Seafoam has soaked into the ring pack or drained into the crankcase, turn the engine over ~10 revs or so (disable the coils first) prior to installing the spark plug (important!).

...And wait until after dark for that test drive...your neighbors will appreciate it. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It never occurred to me to try something like this! I've tried some of the forte products in the past (which didn't really do anything) but nothing directly in the cylinder, what will Seafoam do for the oil ring?

Many thanks,

Darren.
 

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Pour about 10-15cc of Seafoam into cylinder #4 after removing the spark plug. Allow the Seafoam to weep down into that ring pack (over 5-6 hours) so the rings can move freely and function properly once again.:cool: To make sure all Seafoam has soaked into the ring pack or drained into the crankcase, turn the engine over ~10 revs or so (disable the coils first) prior to installing the spark plug (important!).

...And wait until after dark for that test drive...your neighbors will appreciate it. ;)
Good call!
I actually thought about that during work today, but couldn't get connected to post on it.

It never occurred to me to try something like this! I've tried some of the forte products in the past (which didn't really do anything) but nothing directly in the cylinder, what will Seafoam do for the oil ring?

Many thanks,

Darren.
Seafoam is your friend my friend. Seafoam is a petroleum product that works wonders inside your engine and other places.
Basically it's a cleaning agent. You can use it to flush out the oiling system on your car if your having trouble with clogged orifices. Such as the valve train not getting enough oil.
If you pour a bit of that right into the cylinder and let it sit as Electro Man states, it might just loosen up those oil control rings. The Seafoam actually breaks down burnt / hard oil deposits.
Seafoam sells for about $8 U.S. Well worth the money.

I would definitely try the Seafoam in the cylinder before doing anything else. Just make sure you crank the engine with that spark plug removed after letting sit for at least 6 hours. Liquid doesn't compress!
I would even take it a step further. I would pour a whole bottle in the crankcase with the oil and run the engine at idle (NOTHING MORE THAN IDLE!!) for about a 1/2 hour.
That will flush the entire oil system and clean up the inside of your engine.
After running the engine for a 1/2 hour or so, drain the oil, change out the oil filter with new one, pour in new engine oil.
Hopefully that will help, it certainly can't hurt anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is great guys thank you so much to everyone who has commented on this I really appreciate it!

I've never heard of Seafoam before but looking on ebay I can buy it over here so I'm going to give it a go! I think I will do what AndreasPassat suggests and go the whole nine yards on it.

I don't really want to write the car off as over the years I've fitted a lot of new parts to it, and other than this issue everything is in order. The car is used every day so its difficult to have it off the road for long periods of time, but if I can put a 'sticking plaster' on it for now until I can afford a second car to get me about that would give me some time to rethink my options, and maybe even have a go at swapping those rings myself and learn something along the way (which might turn out to be not doing a job like that myself but you never know :lol:)

I'll get some ordered today and report back with my results :)

Many thanks again!

Darren.
 

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First time I attempted the Seafoam Ring Pack treatment was on an '89 Jetta GLI 16V with ~180K on the clock (intermittent smoking from tail pipe). The treatment took one entire day since I manually turned the crank two revs on five or six occasions.

The most :nervous: I got was near the end of the day - only two of four cylinders had loose enough ring packs to allow the ~15 cc of Seafoam to drain into the oil pan. IF THE ENGINE IS TURNED OVER WITH LIQUID IN ANY OF THE CYLINDERS, THE ENGINE WILL HYDROLOCK!!! So I disconnected the coil, placed a couple rags over the subject cylinders (that still had liquid on top of the pistons) and cranked the starter over. Turning the engine over meant the remaining Seafoam wound up as an aerosol soaked onto the rags; however, since Seafoam is roughly as flammable as gasoline, extreme caution should be taken with this step (gasoline aerosol is potently dangerous!).

After the plugs were back in and coil wore reconnected, took the car for a long test drive in the country. After the residual Seafoam burned off of everything, with more smoke than you can imagine, the intermittent smoking issue was solved. This was three yrs (and ~15,000 miles) ago, still no smoke from the tail pipe.

Yes, I do have a large oak tree in the back yard that provides ample shade in July and August. :D

:beer:
 
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