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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I've just run into the inevitability of clutch replacement. My car has 122k on the odo ('98 1.8t). Aside from a clutch kit, what else do I need to buy to make sure this is done right? Any bearings, seals, bolts etc that I should source before I take my car in to the shop? What is the likelyhood of me needing to replace the flywheel as opposed to simply resurfacing it? To save on labor, I think I'm going to have the shop replace the halfshafts at the same time. My inner boots are completely torn.

I'm actually a little sad because I was really hoping to do this work myself. That's proving to be problematic. I simply don't have the time right now.

-Mark
 

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If it's the stock flywheel, most shops don't like to resurface a dual-mass flywheel, although it can be done if it's a light resurfacing. I've got an AWE Stage II clutch & light aluminum flywheel - no issues with the flywheel whatsoever, although engagement of the clutch is light, I'd hoped for something a bit more aggressive. As I'm sure you know, this is an involved job - I had a garage do mine. No unusual parts, but when I get home I'll look at the BoM and let you know if there was anything out of the ordinary there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That would be awesome if you could look at the BOM and point out any other parts that I might need.

-Mark
 

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The cat/downpipe has to be removed in order to remove the transmission. You'll need the turbo/cat gasket, new turbo/cat bolts and a spare turbo/cat stud. Also check the downpipe/middle resonator clamp in it can be reused.
 

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The bolts holding my cat to frontpipe were shot and I could not separate the two (they are placed pretty awkwardly) so had to force it all out as one which ended up breaking the flexi joint. bit of a shame. Still new downpipe was only 70 quid or so from VW which I was quite suprised about.

Found this job a real pain but I hadn't undertaken anythiong like it before. It would help to have a buddy help you. I did it on my own and it's not fun when you're detaching the tranny from above and it slips from the jack below and jams your hand against the engine bay and there is no-one around to help you :(. Luckily I pulled hand free and only lost some skin but scared me a bit. It's alos a pain in the butt lowering and raising tranny on your own balancing it on a trolley jack, then trying to mate to engine! Would be nice to construct some tool to keep it level. Got an old wooden chair to try and make something but to no avail. Still, got a sense of achievement once done. Much better, though I can hear/feel a bit of a 'clang' as it disengages when shifting from 1st to second if I'm not gentle when releasing the clutch pedal. Wonder if they sent me the right pressure plate (is that the bit with the spring in the middle, I forget!). Annoying but not having another go at that until I have to :)

Reckon I might pay someone else next time. Only took it on cos I had several labour intensive jobs that needed doing and wasn't sure if car would ever run ok again so didn't want to spend money I didn't have to on it (i.e labour)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not terribly concerned about the cat/downpipe connection. I planned to get a new gasket and nuts anyway. My biggest questions/concerns are...

1) flywheel, once its off, where to take it to have it machined here in the Phoenix area
2) Where to buy flywheel bolts and pressure plate bolts for my AEB
3) how to jack the car without any risk of it falling on me
4) making sure I have all the necessary tools. (pilot bearing puller etc)

I'm going to be installing new halfshafts at the same time.

Also, does anyone have any information on rebuilding the tranny. I have a 3rd gear that's slightly out of whack. May just need to take the tranny to a shop once its out of the car to have them check out the shift forks and such.

-Mark
 

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1. I dont know your area.
2. Dealer, ECs, I'm sure other places.
3. 6-8 Jack stands to be safe, and cinder blocks to be safe.
4. Can help, but someone did a write-up about that listed tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I noticed at ECS that they sell bolts, but do not list the AEB as an application. That was my reason for the question. Thanks for the extra info. :)

-Mark
 

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All I needed for mine was pressure plate, new friction disc and new release bearing.

The kit I received didn't include a pilot bearing so I didn't need any pullers / bolts etc. myself (AEB also)
Did buy a cheap clutch alignment tool which came in handy. lined up first go

2 axle stands under the sills worked fine for me

I followed the percious instructions linked to above and found these to be pretty good.



What's with the flywheel machining? I didn't touch mine
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What's with the flywheel machining? I didn't touch mine
It's basically the equivalent of machining brake rotors. It basically prepares the flywheel for the new clutch disc, optimizing friction. My guess is that the holding friction of the clutch system is compromised when the flywheel isn't machined.

-Mark
 

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OK i get you :)

Not heard of this being done on most regular clutch replacements though. I guess if you're doing it yourself though might as well do it right :)
 

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I did mine 2 times now. The 2nd time was caused by a faulty OEM flywheel that made me do the entire thing again..

Parts.

1. Clutch
2. Flywheel
3. Pressure Plate
4. Throw-out bering
5. Flywheel bolts (they are use once stretch bolts)
6. input shaft seal (not required, but a good thing to replace while you are in there.

You need to pay special attention to the style of flywheel bolts that you order. There are 2 types of flywheel bolt that can be purchased. One is a has a wide head, and the other is small (obviously). They both take the same size tool to remove. I think the last flywheel that I purchased (the one currently installed) is from an A4 of newer vintage and takes the wide variety of bolt.


I didn't have to do anything with my exhaust besides unbolt the mount for the downpipe from the gearbox itself. I did the job with my exhaust connected the entire time.

the first time it took me about 6 hours, the 2nd time roughly 4 (with allot of Bs'ing in the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I realize that I have to pay special attention to the FW bolts. That's why I asked. :D Does anyone know of a place that sells the older style bolts likely found on my AEB (1998 1.8t)?

I just want to make sure I don't have the tranny off, ready to install the FW and can't bolt it up.

-Mark
 

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The dealer (either Audi or VW) should have both styles. At least they do in Minnesota.

All I needed for mine was pressure plate, new friction disc and new release bearing.


What's with the flywheel machining? I didn't touch mine
It brakes the glaze and gives the new clutch disk a chance to seat or grab the flywheel better. A flywheel with hot spots or scoring in the surface will not grip as well as a resurfaced unit with good crosshatch and a good gripping surface.

If your car isn't chipped, or pushing high torque by other means, you most likely will not notice this. I resurfaced a flywheel on an Audi A4 (chipped), and had to do the job over again because the new setup started slipping within weeks of changing only the clutch. I didn't do a good enough job with my resurface work it turned out! .

Since then, I will only do, or quote the job with a new Flywheel (lightened or not).
 

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Is there a special tool need other the a clutch alignment tool.
Technically yes.

However you can manually line up the disk centrally within the flywheel / pressure plate assembly before tightening the pressure plate bolts. It just takes more time, and can be frustrating if you are wrong the first few times.

I actually used a centering tool from a Nissan (of all things) for my Audi / VW installs. Granted it isn't optimal, but I still haven't missed the alignment (knock on wood!)
 
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