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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a friend from work who brought his car over with a STOP condition on it tonight.
Before it got to me, it was at a local garage. They pulled the bottom oil pan section off and said the engine was junk. But they would not explain why and then did him a favor by only charging $315 to diagnose the car. Then they had the nuts to tell him they didn't know if they could fix it. What? :hmmm:
It sounded a little fishy to me so I told him to have it towed to my house.
Based on input from my friend I think the CCT shoes got chewed up and it's plugging the screen on the oil pick up tube.
Ooh I'm all giddy. All the years I've worked on Passat's they've always been v6's. Just the way the dice roll I guess.
It'll be nice to have something where I can actually fit my hand in the engine bay.

My friend will be over tomorrow again and I'll get the whole history of the car, then I'll be divin' in.
 

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Congratulations (I think). Seeing that you been here long enough to post 1844 times I doubt there is much I can post that you do not already know :)

Just a reminder that by the book when dealing with the sludge problem on these engines the Dealer would start by taking each cam cap off and inspecting for wear. If they did not find anything they would assume they got to it in time and replace the oil pickup & pump (and the chain tensioner/shoes if they were broken). If they found the cam caps worn it was assumed that there would be more damage found in the internals of the engine due to oil starvation.
 

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My first time ever... working on a 1.8
Ha! Should be a snap to work on one of those little guys. Only one bank of cylinders, 2 less pistons, 10 less valves........... And ALL that extra space under the hood!

:poke:
 

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Damage will usually hit the cam caps 1st, but it would be a good idea to check the bearing clearances on the bottom end. I also prefer to put a new pump in when the bottom is opened up.

When you try to replace the PCV or coolant flange, you can start complaining about room to work again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
- Update -
Talked to the owner again. The car originally was on the way to the garage for a timing belt change (loooong over due).
On the way the over to the garage it got the STOP message, no oil pressure.
Car has 177k on it.

Ha Ha guys, I now know about the oil pan ;)
I've said it before, I don't know jack about the 1.8's, but I'm gonna learn real quick here in the next couple of days.

After talking with the owner, he has decided to put some $$ into this car.

After being here all these years and reading countless posts about the sludge problems and other issues with the 1.8 I feel pretty confident about the task at hand.

I'll be pulling the motor and going through the whole thing top to bottom.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
After doing a complete VCDS scan on the vehicle I'm starting to methodically go through a check point type process before just diving into the engine and pulling parts.
Basically what I am trying prove here, at least on this vehicle anyways, is the reputation of a local garage. The person who owns this car now is the second owner. Has owned it for 1-1/2 years. The previous owner was the original owner of the vehicle since brand new. I've got a whole crap ton of receipts and endless service records of everything done on this car since new. So far what I am finding is that the garage is not as reputable as most think. I still have some sleuthing to do before I call out the local shop, I'm trying to be as diplomatic as I can.

It is my opinion that if a garage has serviced a car for its entire life, the general upkeep and overall condition of certain items should be noted as "yep, this garage is keeping up on their maintenance items."

My observations listed below lead me to believe that this particular garage is really not interested in the customers well being of their car but more for the $$. So sad.

Notable observations so far:
1) The PCV system is seriously lacking any kind of maintenance. Every hose is still original. All the rubber hoses around the turbo area are rock hard. And I mean rock hard. I had to saw off the 2 rubber elbows that connect the hard tube that runs along the bottom of the valve cover.

2) Simple yet so tell tale. The slush screen was completely packed full of grass, leaves, helicopters (seeds from tress) plastic bag material.
All that doesn't happen between 1 air filter change.

3) Part of number 1. The vacuum hoses. Still original and completely degraded.

4) The o-rings on the injectors. Every injector is leaking at the o-ring with a mass of oil and debris collecting around each injector.

5) The oil dip stick, obviously left un-corked (if you will) completely saturated with oil under the engine cover and around the intake manifold.

6) The oil fill cap, cracked o-ring in it.

7) Green coolant

But hey, there is a brand spanking new battery in it :bowdown:


After removing the valve cover it is obvious that conventional motor oil has been used for most of its life.
The oil is severly burned and the head is completely starved of oil.
I pulled off a few of the cam caps and fortunately there is no scaring or galling going on. Got to it just in time.
Next couple of days will be getting the engine ready to come out of the car so I can go through it and make assessments on repairs.
 

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To be fair, the garage could've suggested work to be done that the PO declined.....

Not saying the shop is quality, of course. But it sounds like the PO already spent a good deal ("crap ton of receipts and endless service records") of money and didn't/couldn't pay more.....

Now, if the receipts SAY the garage performed certain jobs that obviously have not been done, that's a horse of a different color.
 

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The rubber hoses around the turbo turn to rock in about 2 years. I usually have to chisel them off when pulling out the combi valve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
UPDATE 2/14/16

I know I posted earlier that I would just pull the motor, but I was hemming and hawing the last week whether or not I should do that. This last week just sucked a$$ with the frigid temps getting all the way up to around 10 degrees or whatever it was.
I have determined it would definitely be easier to just pull the whole engine and take care of the issues that way. Way to many little issues to tackle with this thing in the engine bay.
If I'm going to do this job the right way, every single rubber hose must be replaced. I tried doing Seafoam in the crankcase and then later resorted to straight kerosene in place of oil. Still VERY limited oil to the head.
I don't plan on messing around with the transmission, there is nothing wrong with it. All issues are engine related.

Anyways, to the people who have actually pulled their 1.8t out of the car, this question is for you.

To remove the engine, which is easier, taking the trans out with the motor, or just pulling the motor? This is a 1.8t FWD auto.
 

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With a hoist and space, pulling them together is far easier. That's how I did the 1.8T from the donor even though I was not going to use the trans.

We also go hit with a cold front. It was only 65 yesterday after hitting 75 the 2 days before that :p
 

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My last adventure, I raised the car as high as possible on jack stands, placed a dolly under the subframe and lowered just so the subframe is touching the dolly. Loosened subframe bolts, disconnected exhaust, wiring. Front end removed of course. Then jacked up the body again just a bit, and plulled the engine and trans out. Makes is so much easier to work on things when out. I used a hoist too begore, just to get the engine out, less dismantling, had the front end in service position only. But a bit tricky to attach back to transmission, it was automatic, so if not seated properly, it can ruin it.
 

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It's easier to disconnect a couple (or three) CV joints, shifter linkage, and clutch hydraulics than to get to all the motor-to-tranny bolts when it's all in the car, especially the top ones. Same goes for reinstallation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the info guys. Pulling the trans and motor will be my route then.
Aside from all the other stuff going on with this repair job, I am just absolutely in awe with the amount of rubber hoses on the 1.8t.
I'm going to make a bold statement here, I actually think its easier to pull a v6 motor than the 1.8t.
If I don't ask for help during re-assembly it'll be nothing short of a miracle. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
UPDATE 3-2-16
Well for starters, holy crap! It's been a month already since this car has been in my garage. I gotta get spend more time working on this thing. Anyways...
I pulled the engine and trans out last weekend, fairly smooth. The sheer number of hoses on this car just blows.
It's unanimous, I'll take a V6 anyday. yeah they're packed in like a can of sardines, but a couple of hoses here and there and BAM out comes the engine.

I got the engine block and head completely stripped of parts. A whole trunk load of goodies is going over to the local shop and they are going to boil out the block, heads and the other goodies to get rid of all that baked on neglected oil.
For the ones who have done it, I'm trying to source a COMPLETE gasket kit for this whole damn engine. I've used Victor Reinz gaskets before on my Passats, Is that a good set to put on the 1.8? Others?
Maybe some tidbits of must haves while I'm at this point?

I'm also wondering if I should stick with the original piston rings on re-assembly, or should I slap in some new ones? Car has 170k on it.
I've done this in the past with standard rings (no chrome moly or anything performance) so the rings will seal again without putting in a cross hatch pattern on the bores.
Anybody here done this on their Passat?
 

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I had a steering knuckle in my shed. Really!
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If the motor had good compression and oil control, you could just keep the OE rings. How's the original crosshatching?

Though if I were that deep into a motor, I'd probably just renew everything and have a 'new' engine in the end.
 
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