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Thanks for the review, the increased maintenance is something to keep in mind. Still, I think the improved feel of the brakes is worth it. I can actually do heel-toe downshifts now!
 

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Great review....I've noticed the same thing. I've had to take mine out twice already and relube with the lube that came with it. I'm almost out, so looks like I'll be checking for some of that "CRC" (what is that?) you mentioned. I'm wondering if, once the pins are installed, if putting a layer of the grease over the outside of the pin would act as that barrier. Probably not well enough though.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
swcrow17 said:
Great review....I've noticed the same thing. I've had to take mine out twice already and relube with the lube that came with it. I'm almost out, so looks like I'll be checking for some of that "CRC" (what is that?) you mentioned. I'm wondering if, once the pins are installed, if putting a layer of the grease over the outside of the pin would act as that barrier. Probably not well enough though.....
CRC is the brand . . . . my tube says CRC Synthetic Brake Grease. Cost me $4.99 for a good sized tube of it.

Dave
 

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Well, I figured these would take some maintenance. I have been pleasantly surprised that mine have taken less maintenance than I anticipated. May have something to do with the dry climate in ABQ.

Mine didn't come with any grease...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
S_Klass said:
Dave, have you explored any kind of make-shift dust cap just over the pin area as opposed to a dust boot?
There's no way to make them fit on there. I do have a feasible idea that would reuse / modify the stock dust boot, but it'd require a re-tooling of the brass insert itself. Just better to maintain them religiously.

Dave
 

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Yeah, you'd have to literally glue a "dome" in place covering the pin end... kinda like the lo-beam access covers on the B5.5 headlights.

Where'd you order the CRC lube from?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
pete1 said:
Yeah, you'd have to literally glue a "dome" in place covering the pin end... kinda like the lo-beam access covers on the B5.5 headlights.

Where'd you order the CRC lube from?
Napa

Actually my thoughts were to cut the OE bushing in the middle leaving a lip on the inside. If Tyrolsport could machine an outer groove, the modified stock boot could easily press into the groove.

Dave
 

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I have been fortunate so far. I have not had any issues since I installed the Brake stiffening pins I am contemplating purchasing a pair for my other care which uses almost the same caliper. I was fortunate to order the pins just when Tyrol started to include the CRC brake lube grease.

I was considering using CV joint grease since this is way heavier than the CRC brake lube grease.

I suggested this before when others were complaining about substandard lubricant were using before the kits came with grease.

I see nobody has tried this yet but I get the feeling this would be more resistant to brake dust since CV joint grease adhere so well to the parts it is applied to.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
phantom GLI said:
I have been fortunate so far. I have not had any issues since I installed the Brake stiffening pins I am contemplating purchasing a pair for my other care which uses almost the same caliper. I was fortunate to order the pins just when Tyrol started to include the CRC brake lube grease.

I was considering using CV joint grease since this is way heavier than the CRC brake lube grease.

I suggested this before when others were complaining about substandard lubricant were using before the kits came with grease.

I see nobody has tried this yet but I get the feeling this would be more resistant to brake dust since CV joint grease adhere so well to the parts it is applied to.
The only problem is temperature resistance . . . Valvoline Synpower (one of the best CV greases out there) is only temp resistant to around 470ish IIRC . . . I'd think that the grease would be exposed to much higher temps than that.

Dave
 

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Dave I don't think that the temperature is that big of issue when I painted my calipers I used Duplicolor engine paint that is only rated for 500 degrees if I recall correctly and the paint is still fine. Besides I think that CV joints are subjected to lots of force and other strains, which may include elevated temperatures.

I think you are over estimating the operating temperature of your brakes. The stiffening pins are not even a contact surface. So stop sweating the temp and give it a shop. If istdoes not work then you just shot a hole in my theory. If it does work then you may have found another dust resistant grease.

One more thing I live on a hilly island (you could call it mountainous) were brake pads normally don't last more than a year and a half and our brake temperature don't exceed past 550 degrees so the Synpower grease should do the job.

The bronze alloy bushing will mar the slider pin, this is just simply because metal is meeting metal. The OEM bushing use rubber is what saves the slider pin. I may be years from now but eventually the Tyrol kit will have to be replaced because of excessive wear so I would hold on to the OEM bushing and sliders.

NOW Dave GIT-R-DONE
 

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Discussion Starter #15
phantom GLI said:
Dave I don't think that the temperature is that big of issue when I painted my calipers I used Duplicolor engine paint that is only rated for 500 degrees if I recall correctly and the paint is still fine. Besides I think that CV joints are subjected to lots of force and other strains, which may include elevated temperatures.

I think you are over estimating the operating temperature of your brakes. The stiffening pins are not even a contact surface. So stop sweating the temp and give it a shop. If istdoes not work then you just shot a hole in my theory. If it does work then you may have found another dust resistant grease.

One more thing I live on a hilly island (you could call it mountainous) were brake pads normally don't last more than a year and a half and our brake temperature don't exceed past 550 degrees so the Synpower grease should do the job.

The bronze alloy bushing will mar the slider pin, this is just simply because metal is meeting metal. The OEM bushing use rubber is what saves the slider pin. I may be years from now but eventually the Tyrol kit will have to be replaced because of excessive wear so I would hold on to the OEM bushing and sliders.

NOW Dave GIT-R-DONE
The only problem with that logic is that metal is better conductor of heat than rubber. The brass bushings pressed into the iron calipers will definetely transmit more heat to the grease than rubber will.

I've measured my rotor temps at ~680 degrees once with an infrared thermometer. Its hard to believe that a metal bushing ~1 cm away from the rotor surface wouldn't have a similar temperature.

Oh and I checked . . . . the Synpower grease is only good until 425 degrees.

Dave
 

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Dave the rotor is supposed to get hot and it will get hot. I read an article in European car or Sport compact car that say braking is the tranferring of kinetic energy to heat energy. This why drilled rotor improve braking because they shed heat faster.

Next time you pull out to infrared thermometer measure the surface of the caliper, the bushing and even your allowy wheel that is bolted to right next to the 680 degrees rotor and then tell what is the difference in temperatures.

Here is some useless information: Racing Dynamics (A BMW tuner) produce an alloy wheel with hollow spoke. They claim that the spoke provide a mechanism for braking heat to be wicked away from the rotor to provide better cooling. This idea sounds great and sensational but this discovery is not great enough for then to continue to mass produce this wheel or for other Motor sports racing teams to use a similar design.

Both of us are playing Armchair engineers here and every one knows that even engineer test their theories.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
phantom GLI said:
Dave the rotor is supposed to get hot and it will get hot. I read an article in European car or Sport compact car that say braking is the tranferring of kinetic energy to heat energy. This why drilled rotor improve braking because they shed heat faster.

Next time you pull out to infrared thermometer measure the surface of the caliper, the bushing and even your allowy wheel that is bolted to right next to the 680 degrees rotor and then tell what is the difference in temperatures.

Here is some useless information: Racing Dynamics (A BMW tuner) produce an alloy wheel with hollow spoke. They claim that the spoke provide a mechanism for braking heat to be wicked away from the rotor to provide better cooling. This idea sounds great and sensational but this discovery is not great enough for then to continue to mass produce this wheel or for other Motor sports racing teams to use a similar design.

Both of us are playing Armchair engineers here and every one knows that even engineer test their theories.
#1 its impossible to measure the temperature of the bushing.

#2 I'm not saying that the bushing reaches 680F, I'm just saying that its going to be experiencing a huge amount of radiant heat from the face of the rotor which is not very far away at all.

#3 Since when did you get the notion that X-drilled rotors cool better? Directionally vaned rotors cool better if anything.

Dave
 

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Dave I concede,

Let us know if you have any other issues with the Tyrol pins and I will keep my fingers crossed that I don't end up having the same issue as you, ( knock on wood) You have convinced me that my suggestion wouldn't work. ( Yeah Right) :crazy:
 

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No, but I'll describe... Stock bushings are a rubber cylinder with a caliper-pin-sized hole down the middle (~3/8"). The outer (relative to the car) end has a fatter flange that hooks onto the caliper, the inner end has the same flange, only it then extends inward as a thin-walled rubber cylinder, for about 1/2". The cylinder extends beyond the end of the pin, and a cap fits into the end to cover everything.
 
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