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I have been viewing this site for a month or so, but only recently joined. I have been a member of other forums for several years and am generally familiar with the process.

I am now the proud owner of a 2000 Passat GLX. It is a 2.8L V6 with the Tiptronic transmission. It is black with black leather interior and wood grain accents and looks showroom new. The car has 198,000 miles and has an almost new battery and Michelin Primacy MXV4 tires on the 16” wheels that were standard on this model. This Passat is a sedan. I have all of the Owner Manuals issued with this vehicle. I purchased the Chilton (Haynes) Manual at an Auto Parts store.

I am a 64 year old retired corporate type and needed something to do. I decided to purchase a car requiring some work at a below market price, repair it, and then resale it. I paid $2,000. It has a clean CARFAX. The previous owner had purchased this car for his daughter as a college commute vehicle. Hearing a noise, he took it to a shop for repairs. The shop replaced the power steering pump and still having the noise, advised him that it needed a new water pump. Upset by the misdiagnosis, he had the vehicle returned to his garage and planned to replace the water pump with the help of a friend. He quickly abandoned the idea and put it up for sale. When I purchased the car, the engine covers were removed, the power steering pulley and serpentine belt were removed, as well. The camshaft pulleys were uncovered and the timing belt off each pulley. I had it towed to my house where I have a garage, 2 ½ ton floor jack, 2 pairs jack stands, and a reasonable set of tools waiting.

I put the car in the service position and discovered that the real source of the noise was not the water pump at all, but rather was a dissentigrated timing belt roller. I replaced the roller, water pump, timing belt, and thermostat and buttoned it back up. I know that many of you will say that I should hav e replaced the tensioners, etc. I have enough gray hair to know that this school of thought will lead you to a bottomless money pit. Since my labor is "worthless", I will repair other problems as they happen and make the high probability fix's now. Already, I have spent an additional $1200 and I still have issues. Thanks in advance for your help. Over the next few days I will share with you my comedy of errors.
 

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I know that many of you will say that I should hav e replaced the tensioners, etc. I have enough gray hair to know that this school of thought will lead you to a bottomless money pit. Since my labor is "worthless", I will repair other problems as they happen and make the high probability fix's now. Already, I have spent an additional $1200 and I still have issues. Thanks in advance for your help. Over the next few days I will share with you my comedy of errors.
I would hardly qualify changing the timing belt tensioner as an unneeded expense, but to each his own I guess. The main reason our cars have premature timing belt failures is not the failure of the belt, but the failure of the tensioner. That seems like a big gamble to take on what amounts to a part that costs well under $100 to purchase, yet will cost a lot of money to fix if it fails.

.02
 
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