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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok, so i've got B1 S1 codes on my 2000, 1.8T, ATW, Tip and i was sitting down w/ my bentley and haynes to figure out what i need to do to get this oxygen sensor replaced (anti-seize, special socket maybe) ... they had a diagram but no 1.8L picture so i head out to the car to see what i can see. can someone confirm that is this actually the pre-cat o2 sensor?



i can't believe how accessible it is. is it easier than changing the oil? easier than the pollen filter? easier than the "disposable" rear brake pads? easier than the air filter? easier than the snow screen? i guess something has to be on top, but how odd that it's got so much room all to itself. i see the wire wraps all the way around so i guess it's not going to be trivial, which is nice :lookout:

thanks,

a.s.
 

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Yep, nice and easy. V6 is a bit harder, but not that bad.
 

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Easy is still a relative term. Note the wires that are in the way of where the socket wrench would go. And also consider that the sensor's mounting point is rusty and has been heated to close to 1000 degrees over and over again. You're still going to have a fun time getting that thing out and putting the new one in without busting anything or having an exhaust leak. Changing the oil is still easier.
 

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O2 socket is "free" from autozone via tool loaner program....it has a cutout for the wire :thumbup: easy as pie esp if you pre-treat the sensor with PB Blaster.
 

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The PB Blaster makes the difference. The O2 socket comes offvery easily when this is applied and you wait. There is some some from the dried residue but it does dicipate shortly. You just have to make sure the engine is cool when you apply it because it is highly flammable. On the downtake sensor, if you remove the coolant resevoir and use the O2 sensor socket with extensions and swivel socket attachment and it will do the trick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
it wasn't that bad, but i used a lot of creative energy to get leverage on that thing (said 'i guess i need to find the bigger wrench' 2 times, lol) and then to get the wire unclipped all the way around the back of the engine... that was a pretty serious hassle.

i did the cut and solder routine w/ the bosch sensor and while i was pretty nervous it does seem to have worked out fine. heat-shrink tubing and then covered it with a section of the old rubber housing and some zip-ties.

also, does anyone worry about the torque? it says 37 lb-ft in the bently and basically "nice and tight" in the haynes... i pussed out and didn't get a click out of my wrench, it seemed like a lot of force. i was thinking maybe the anti-seize was causing it to spin easier.

also, i bought the socket, so if anyone in the SE metro needs it, hit me up!

a.s.
 

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Easy is still a relative term. Note the wires that are in the way of where the socket wrench would go. And also consider that the sensor's mounting point is rusty and has been heated to close to 1000 degrees over and over again. You're still going to have a fun time getting that thing out and putting the new one in without busting anything or having an exhaust leak. Changing the oil is still easier.
130k MN miles on my car when it came out. Broke loose with a simple turn of a wrench.

Most upstream O2 sensors I have changed on B5s (Passat and Audi A4) were like that. The high temps actually help deter rust in some ways, as salt water usually will evaporate on contact with the unit. It also has quite a bit of shielding from the elements where it is located.
 

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130k MN miles on my car when it came out. Broke loose with a simple turn of a wrench.

Most upstream O2 sensors I have changed on B5s (Passat and Audi A4) were like that. The high temps actually help deter rust in some ways, as salt water usually will evaporate on contact with the unit. It also has quite a bit of shielding from the elements where it is located.
Me too, also if any one cares a 7/8 inch flare nut wrench works well.
 

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I had to replace mine a while ago and I was having trouble getting it to break free. One or two light taps with a small hammer on one of the wrench flats and the thing could almost have been unscrewed by hand.
 
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Just a comment on oiling your exhaust. I've replaced an aftermarket header because of what I can only determine as "oil rot". WTF? well, i think the burned off oil leaves something behind on the pipe that overtime speeds up the rusting process. The more times you repeat the oil burn off it would seem the sooner the hole starts where the oil leaks onto the pipe. I've seen the same thing on a tractor exhaust pipe. Its doesn't make sense at first.

I'd toss a rag on the exhaust to catch what you can before you soak it. Then hose off what you can before you bake it on.
 
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