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I need some time before I can take the car out of service to work on the Turbo Unit on my 2003 B5.5 Passat 1.8

Started to leak oil into the plastic tubes to the inter-cooler.

It would allow me to use the car until I can find a "window" to take the Turbo Unit itself and see if I can rebuild it myself.

I got the car at a high used price from my ex just to help. But as the old saying goes: " There is no good deed that can go unpunished" I have been pumping money and time into this car since I got it three years ago. No bad because I love the car, and I have mainly paid only for parts. My labor I consider it free since I am now retired.

I can do precision work and takes me lots of time, but I have more of that then bread to pay for repairs. Besides, I have done work on my own cars for 66 years.

My first thought would be to plug the oil supply and return lines to/from the Turbo and disable the signal that gets the Turbo to start pumping air. I assume that without oil supply also the Turbo shaft should be "locked" so no further damage to the unit occurs and allows for further rebuilding.

Any ideas if at all possible directions and how to disable the Turbo (what to do that can be reversed later with maybe only minor damage) and also stopping the Turbo rotor from destroying itself if running without oil?
I can happily put up without the pep of the turbo for a while if this is possible.

I thank in advance for any pointers or other solutions to the above.
 

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There is no signal to engage the turbo, it runs on exhaust gas pressure. You could dump the extra manifold pressure the turbo generates to the outside but there is nothing that will stop the turbo from turning except to take it out.

The car will have very little power without a turbo. You could probably drive it but don't expect it to run normally at all.

How much oil is it leaking? It is normal to have a few drops to a few ounces of oil in the intercooler hoses. If the oil level isn't dropping quickly you can probably still drive it until you get it fixed. I have a few used turbo's and could sell one for little $. PM me if you're interested.
 

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Iowegian is right, the only thing electronic on the turbo is really the wastegate, but there's nothing stopping the compressor from spooling and without oil, it'll destroy the turbo fast.
 

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Started to leak oil into the plastic tubes to the inter-cooler. It would allow me to use the car until I can find a "window" to take the Turbo Unit itself and see if I can rebuild it myself.
Before condemning the turbo, it would be a good idea to get acquainted with how they actually work. As said, they are not turned on or off by an electrical signal, or by oil pressure. And if a turbo is so badly damaged that it leaks oil from the compressor or turbine end, it will leak whether the rotor is stopped or not.

By "plastic tubes" I suspect that you mean the rubber discharge hose from the compressor housing of the turbo, and/or the hose which brings the air into the intercooler, is that correct? Iowegian points out that some oil in those hoses, including the throttle, is normal. The crankcase breather system discharges oily vapors into the induction system, which could be mistaken for a turbo problem. But first you need to confirm your problem; Is the car smoking? How do the spark plugs look; black and sooty or dry and almost white? Whirring noises when stepping on the throttle?

As for rebuilding, the turbocharger is unfortunately not like an alternator or starter motor that can be restored by new brushes, for instance. By the time a turbocharger fault is evident, the damage often makes repairing it beyond hope. The good news is that new, aftermarket turbos are available that work fine, at least the one we put on our 1.8T did.
 
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