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All you need to do is see that their retinas do not have many cone cells.

The structure of the dog's retina helps explain other idiosyncrasies of canine vision. Abundant light-sensitive cells called rods in your dog's retina help it detect motion and see well in dim light - clear advantages for canines stalking prey at dusk or dawn or guarding territory against intruders. In contrast, the human retina is made up predominantly of cones - receptors that are better at detecting color and processing bright light. Contrary to popular belief, dogs are not completely colorblind for they do have cones in their retinas. But dogs can't distinguish the full spectrum of colors.
 

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i think that is a partial myth ...they are not color blind they just have deuteranopia - cant tell green i think. i read somewhere that its because they see much better at night than us and the reason we can not see well at night is bc we have >cones than rods. so they have more rods for night vision therefore <cones for color. but they do have some cones...
 

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I don't know about colorblind, but my weiner-mutt Waylon likes to look at himself in the full-length mirror on my bathroom door, and he sticks his right front paw up to it really really slowly as if doing the E.T. finger touch thing to his reflection.
 
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