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electric stuff is all the same as far as i am aware of.

the engines are similar..but i think there is some extra custom tuning done to them to suit the european countries.

Also to note... there is a lot of TDIs in europe.. much more than sold in america. You will find that they outnumber the 1.8Ts.

But I am yet to see any major differences between the builds for the euro market and US.

Abe
 

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I think you can (or could) get a 1.8 without the T. Can't imagine what it would be like driving it, though - Passat's a pretty heavy car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you think that 1.8 Passat is slow then what will 1.6 be? They sell Passat with 1.6 engine.
I am asking, about the differences because I am thinking of installing a 557 P ecu to a 558 E equipped car.
If the parts are identical then the car should work ok. What do you think??? Will it work?
 

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European Cars vs. US Models

A few of you have noticed that the European models of cars sold in the US - typically have vastly more "sub-models" than we do here. Reason?, gas costs. When gas costs $4 or $5/gallon, 300 cc difference in engine displacement can mean a 1-2 mpg difference on the road. Hence, manufacturers will often have many engine/transmission choices - so you can "tailor" your car to the type of driving you will do.

Also, especially in Germany, where there are still a lot of autobahns without speed limits (getting harder and harder to find these - and when you do find them, there is traffic to contend with.

But, a Passat with a 1.6 liter engine (no Turbo) can still, eventually, get up to maybe 200 kph (about 122 mph). Europeans are used to paying for a car based upon its "top speed", whereas in the US, low end torque (ability to move away from a red light) is much more important. Thus, the cars sold here, whether made in Europe, Japan or Korea - tend to have the larger displacement engines - often unavailable in their own home markets. For example, I'm not sure you can get the 265 hp V6 that is an "option" in the Nissan Altima (in the US) back in the home Japanese market.

BMWs are another model with a vast array of engines. YOu can still get the 3 series with a 1.6 liter 4 cylinder engine. That model can still go about 135 mph - but the little engine is probably wound out to about 6,500 rpm - which a European driver will think nothing of driving at - for an hour or more straight.

When Lexus was first sold in Germany, the engines simply could not stand being run at or near redline - for several hours. The Japanese engineers - had designed these cars for the typical low rpm use as in the US market.

I think the Japanese have corrected these problems - and now the Germans are really worried about Lexus and Infinity as serious competition to BMW, Mercedes, and Audi - as typically these Japanese sedans are 2/3 the price of the equivalent German models.
 

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As the owner of a US spec 99 1.8T that currently lives in the UK (me and the car), I can tell you that there are some differences between US and European spec (especially in the earlier models). Although all the cars originate in 4 or 5 factories in Germany, I know some of the electronics differ (example: the purple plug to hook up the VAG Comp in my car is below my steering wheel vice being under the pencil holder in European spec Passats) .

I can also tell ya that my 1.8 is considered a large engine to people in the UK. I see people driving around in 1.1 to 1.4 engine cars all the time. With petrol at almost $6/gallon, same turbo diesels are the preference.

I'm not an expert, but I would be careful about swapping electronic parts from a European and a US spec engine. Just my opinion - I'm sure someone else on the board knows a lot more on the subject.
 

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Fuel price is why I bought a TDi. Got a Tunit and I now have a pretty quick car that returns 55 mpg on a run. As for the differences, I don't know too much about the US spec cars but cruise control is a pretty rare option over here and I think my headlamp switch is different to US models. I may be wrong but I think the steering wheel is in a different place too :D

Cheers

Jamie
 

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I was in Germany for 3 years. That is where we bought our USA spec 2003 1.8T Passat. I don't know much about the engines except for that mine goes really fast and it misses the Autobahn :lol: I do know that the factory rims are different on the German spec Passats and also the liscence plate mount. You know, they have the long skinny Euro plates. Not sure if the USA specs are governed or not, I have gotten mine up to 140 mph and could have gone more :shock: but that was here in the states and was scared to push it anymore with the traffic and cops .......... what do you guys think?
 

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With TDI models there are a good few differences, from even the turbo used to software tuning and ECU type...

European and US markets could not be more different...economy, engine size and car price have a huge influence on European car buyers...

The bigger the engine the more you pay for yearly road tax...
Also it should be mentioned that cars over here come in a very basic spec, where options are extremely expensive...
 

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Economy is more & more important to most UK drivers when choosing a car.

I think the TDI 130 is probably the highest selling & most desirable engine in the current Passat range, purely down to the cost of fuel in this country and therefore the MPG that can be achieved with the Turbo Diesel.

You certainly don't see too many used V6 4M or W8 for sale, and when you do, their price is not much more than the TDI, as people literally cannot afford to buy 'gas' for them. The W8 for the UK market is a bit of a waste, I really don't know why they offered it, i am sure they can't have sold very many at all.

The current engine range in the B5.5 passat is

2.0 20v (130 bhp) petrol
1.8T 20v (150 bhp) petrol
2.3 V5 (170 bhp) petrol
2.8 V6 4M (193 bhp) petrol
4.0 W8 4M (271 bhp) petrol

1.9 TDI 100 (100 bhp) diesel
1.9 TDI 130 (130 bhp) diesel
2.5 V6 TDI (160 bhp) diesel

The 1.8 20v non turbo was available as an option in the B5, but was replaced with the 1.8T 20v. The worst engine in the B5.5 range was the 2.0 8v (115 bhp), which was replaced in 2002 with the 2.0 20v (130 bhp).
 

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The electric wiring was different on earlier cars and dependant on equipment. Some Euro cars had equipment that we couldn't get here in US. Like the back up assist warning, HID lights, leveling lights or climtronic on lower trim cars. Prime example of this is the fuse panel and the corresponding card. On the card it says you have fuses where on the panel are none and vice versa.
US generally gets all the bigger engines but lacks some what is considered luxury items. VW has higher prestige standing in Europe than in US.
 
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