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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about set to fix the broken-in-half PCV system on my car (which will hopefully tighten up the cam chain tensioner, yes?) and I figured that since it's a lot easier to get at the system with the intake manifold off, I'll go ahead and install an NSP PowerGasket Plus on the intake at the same time.

Too bad that the intake is wrapped in a rat's nest of wires and hoses. Is there a writeup on how to take off the intake manifold on the AEB engine? If not, would anybody be willing to make one? I'm sure it would be a worthy addition to the repository of knowledge here.
 

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It's not that hard, just remove all the connected hoses, IAT sensor harness, throttle body, fuel rail + injectors, support bar and base plate holding 1 or 2 solenoids underneath the IM. You don't have to remove the fixed upper coolant pipe above the IM. Have a spare oil dipstick funnel ready while working in that area, they break easily. Since you're going to install a thicker gasket the IM is raised a little bit. You will have some work on the support bar to fit.
 

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^^^Yeah, what he said.^^^ :thumbup:

I take the upper coolant pipe off. It's more work overall, but it sure makes the mani easier to get to.
 

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I'm about set to fix the broken-in-half PCV system on my car (which will hopefully tighten up the cam chain tensioner, yes?) .
No, it won't help the cam chain tensioner, but it might slow any oil leaks you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's not that hard, just remove all the connected hoses, IAT sensor harness, throttle body, fuel rail + injectors, support bar and base plate holding 1 or 2 solenoids underneath the IM. You don't have to remove the fixed upper coolant pipe above the IM. Have a spare oil dipstick funnel ready while working in that area, they break easily. Since you're going to install a thicker gasket the IM is raised a little bit. You will have some work on the support bar to fit.
So basically I remove everything on the top of the engine and I'm golden, yeah?

I was really hoping someone might have written down the order in which the various items have to be removed, because I'm not in a position to be experimenting; this car is my daily driver and I don't have a spare.
 

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move AEB manifold for PCV? easy.

-remove intake hose
-remove bolt from support braket (under manifold on block)
-remove injector wiring
-remove fuel rail, (you'll need to remove the FPR vac line)
-remove coolant cross bar bolt to manifold
-unbolt and put aside coolant tank

LEAVE everything else attached. all you need to do is lift the manifold off the head and pull it away a few inches to access the PCV stuff. no need to disconnect the vac lines...etc.

because of the AEB you may also need to remove the throttle cable.

no need to completely remove the manifold for access to the PCV system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Frankly, it's the part about removing the fuel rail that's got me scared. I've never touched a fuel system before; I'm not worried about spraying fuel all over the place, I'm worried about breaking something without even realizing it. I have absolutely no idea what kinds of seals are used, which direction I should pull parts away from each other to keep from scratching fragile surfaces against each other, that sort of thing.

The instructions should be a big help, but I guess what I need is some reassurance that it's been done before enough times by people who know a good bit -- but not everything -- about their car that I'm not likely to turn into a statistic who gets to tow their car to a dealer in shame.
 

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Frankly, it's the part about removing the fuel rail that's got me scared. I've never touched a fuel system before; I'm not worried about spraying fuel all over the place, I'm worried about breaking something without even realizing it. I have absolutely no idea what kinds of seals are used, which direction I should pull parts away from each other to keep from scratching fragile surfaces against each other, that sort of thing.

The instructions should be a big help, but I guess what I need is some reassurance that it's been done before enough times by people who know a good bit -- but not everything -- about their car that I'm not likely to turn into a statistic who gets to tow their car to a dealer in shame.
the fuel rail is pretty easy to remove. one thing you need to do...is clean/blow any sand away from the injectors when you remove them. gunk ususally collects around the injectors and sand can fall in.

well that is how i remove the fuel rail, with the injectors still attached. two bolts and then pull straight out evenly. it might take some force.

i then fold the fuel rail and injector mass up and onto the battery cover/cowl.
 

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OTOH - the PCV system can be overhauled w/o removing the manifold. If you want to wait for your Powergasket install, you could go ahead and do the PCV stuff and save yourself a lot of work. Unbolting the coolant tank and moving it aside will give you enough room to do the PCV, unless your arms are thigh-sized.
 

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OTOH - the PCV system can be overhauled w/o removing the manifold. If you want to wait for your Powergasket install, you could go ahead and do the PCV stuff and save yourself a lot of work. Unbolting the coolant tank and moving it aside will give you enough room to do the PCV, unless your arms are thigh-sized.
Personally, I dont see how this can be done easily...maybe I just need to drink more beer when I do car work :lol:
 

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Hmmm... I did mine that way. Maybe having an AEB helps? It's not "easy," but it's a lot less overall effort than removing the manifold.
 

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Hmmm... I did mine that way. Maybe having an AEB helps? It's not "easy," but it's a lot less overall effort than removing the manifold.
the first time i did it, i did remove the manifold...this past weekend all i did was pull the manifold off the two studs, and out about 4 inches. I left 90% of the connections attached...much easier than removing...if you can get to the pcv parts without doing that...either you're a midget or....a god :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
the first time i did it, i did remove the manifold...this past weekend all i did was pull the manifold off the two studs, and out about 4 inches. I left 90% of the connections attached...much easier than removing...if you can get to the pcv parts without doing that...either you're a midget or....a god :)
I can get one arm in under the manifold, which technically is enough to cut the shitty VAG clamps with a Dremel + extension cable. The problem is going to be in ensuring proper fitment of the hoses when I press the connectors into place, and in holding the screw clamps in place while I tighten them.
 

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I done 4-5 and have never removed the intake manifold. Cutting pliers, long flat screwdrivers and a box cutter work wonders. It is best to just cut the old rubber T fitting off of the pipes once the clamps are removed. Fight it and you may snap the plastic tube from the engine block. The rubber T is usually so soft that it tears anyway. The last AWM I changed, the tube from the engine block was falling apart too. It seemed like rubber lined plastic.
 

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X2 on Rusty and PZ. Take off that manifold and you're opening another can'o'worms. First, unscrew the coolant tank and tie it out of the way. This will get you some arm and shoulder room. Then pull the hairpin clip from where it attaches to the block. Remove the clamp from the elbow that connects to the turbo pipe in the back and the clamp for the PCV valve nipple. You should then be able to lift the whole thing up, over, down, and out. Bench assemble the new parts at the same angle as the old and install as one piece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Done and done! I opted to remove the intake manifold and replace the PCV hoses at the same time, and it's a damn good thing that I did. The PCV hoses were so cemented in place that I had to literally cut them apart with tin snips, and peel them off their connectors piece by piece. I never would have been able to get the leverage (or the tools) if the manifold had been in the way.

I installed the new hoses with liberal application of ST-140 silicone grease from Silicones.net, to make sure I wouldn't have the same trouble again. Their silicone grease is wonderful stuff -- it's inert under all (reasonable) conditions, it helps seal the hoses at the connection points, and it does such a good job of lubricating that I was able to rotate the PCV hose and the 3-way junction WITH THE CLAMPS FULLY TIGHTENED. I think I won't have to worry about the hoses seizing to each other again.
 

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The PCV hoses were so cemented in place that I had to literally cut them apart with tin snips, and peel them off their connectors piece by piece. I never would have been able to get the leverage (or the tools) if the manifold had been in the way.
My experience exactly. congrats on a successful job:thumbup:
 
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