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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Car:
2000 VW Passat B5 1.8T

Problem:
At idle the car shakes/vibrates and goes to normal when accelerator is pressed (while car is in neutral, or when it is driving).
The shake/vibration returns when the car comes to a stop and is back at idle. Also, the RPM needle vibrates a bit around 800 RPM instead of the normal state of steady at 800 RPM.
After about 20 mins of running the car, the shakes/vibration don't happen any more at idle.

OBD2 Trouble Codes in order of appearance:
1. P1136 (Fuel Trim: Bank 1 (Add): System too Lean)
2. P0303 (Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected) - initially it was a pending code, then turned into a Trouble code over 2 days.
3. P0301 (Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected) - is a new pending code today.

Issue identified so far:
Looked around the engine bay and noticed a hose coming from the intake manifold is torn (next to the coolant expansion tank). Uploaded the video at
  • This hose connects to 058 133 753 B (Suction Pump Vent Purge Valve) on one end and intake manifold on the other.
  • Based on a bit of google the hose looks like part number 06B 133 783 BC (breather hose)
Questions:
1. Are those codes reflective of this torn hose? Or do the codes also point to other issues?
2. Can I just replace the breather hose (06B 133 783 BC)? Or is the torn breather hose a symptom of some other problem?
3. I googled around, and the hose appears to be a component of the PVC or the Crankcase Ventilation System? Should I replace the whole system?
 

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That P1136 code is one of the codes that can be triggered by that hose being split open.

P1136 code

The P0301 & P0303 misfire codes are not usually a direct result of this hose being split, however, if this hose is causing the EGR valve (N18 valve) to malfunction, that can trigger the misfire codes.

Here's your part.

06B 133 783 BC

Yes you can replace just the hose. It's my guess that just due to age the hose got brittle and split open, By the looks of your video, other parts of the system seem to be intact, I would start with that hose and reset the codes with VCDS and see what happens.

Should you replace the whole system? That is something you'll need to assess and determine if it's needed. If there are other hoses that are brittle and or show signs of deterioration, then yes those components should be replaced. Complete emissions refresh kits are sold on ECS Tuning.
Found here: Complete PCV Refresh Kits

These kits can be quite pricey. However, if your car is in decent shape and is subject to stringent emissions testing, it might be worth it to bite the bullet and refresh the whole system to make sure you have trouble free operation for years to come. But again, I would look at the system first and assess the components on a one by one basis and make a determination from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes you can replace just the hose. It's my guess that just due to age the hose got brittle and split open, By the looks of your video, other parts of the system seem to be intact, I would start with that hose and reset the codes with VCDS and see what happens.
Thanks for the quick response on this. This info is very helpful.

Is it possible to keep driving the car while I wait for the replacement parts to arrive?
In other words, would I be risking damage to other critical components such as the engine (given the cylinder misfire and lean fuel trim conditions)?
 

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Yes, you want to fix it before it causes problems. Running lean constantly is not good for the motor. In the meantime, thoroughly clean the old hose and slit with spirits/degreaser, apply a glue like permabond or cyanoacrylate to the opening of the old hose and hold it tightly closed until cured (you could wrap in tape or a thin wire). For good measure, you could buy a short length of hose that is the same or slightly larger in diameter and slice it open on one side down the length of it . Apply contact or rubber cement per instructions and bond with the cut side of the new hose 180° away from the slit in the repaired hose. Again, wrap tightly for even bondage. Once cure time has been reached, it should hold some boost and definitely cure the running lean by sealing the vacuum leak.
 

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VAGguy has a great idea for fixing that hose. I'll admit I didn't think of that. If it takes some time for you to get replacement hose(s), the fix would definitely be recommended and would work if prepped properly.
Running the engine lean is hard on the engine. A lean running engine runs much hotter than normal, not a good thing.
 

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VAGguy has a great idea for fixing that hose. I'll admit I didn't think of that. If it takes some time for you to get replacement hose(s), the fix would definitely be recommended and would work if prepped properly.
Running the engine lean is hard on the engine. A lean running engine runs much hotter than normal, not a good thing.
That comes from too many times where it was my only mode of transportation and I needed it up and running in minutes to hours. Thankfully, I have only had to apply such resourcefulness to this car once or twice. It was mostly done to a mkIII 2.slow I had.
 

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Those kits are pricey :oops: I would only replace what needs replacing. Totally agree to clean what you can. Replace what's needed.

Good thing with ECS is they list the OEM part # along with there #. Use the OEM # to search individual parts needed to see if you can't find them for less.

When I needed to refresh my PCV system I was going to buy one of their kits. When I saw what the individual parts cost in the kit they had a simple rubber 90 degree elbow listed at $100 :unsure:

I called to confirm and the guy on the other end didn't even understand the price. I bought that part for 70 cents at the local parts store and sourced the rest from 2 other places.
 

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for part numbers I also go to Jim Ellis VW 's website as they have great illustrations of the parts and groups, and ease of navigation
 

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Ah, the infamous L-hose! That was one of the first parts I replaced on my Fresco Green Passat after the warranty ran out. My split was on the bottom; car would barely run!

Unless you live in the boonies, it would be worth checking local auto parts stores or VW dealer. This shouldn't be an uncommon part.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
@VAGguy your solution is much more thorough than what I cooked up last night.

My solution was to cut a pen down to size and insert it inside the hose, to prevent the tube from collapsing in on itself while I duck tape it. This does make the passage slightly narrow - but that is all I had available.

@jjpark yeah I noticed that even a rubber hose is super expensive. Wonder if there is a silicon after market hose I can make fit. Just need to figure out the ID of the hose. Couldn't find that info online. So will just order the breather hose this time around.
 

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Check 034 Motorsport, I know they have hose(s) and kits for converting the old rubber to new silicone.
I'm just not 100% sure what exact hoses they have for your application.
 

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Thanks for the quick response on this. This info is very helpful.

Is it possible to keep driving the car while I wait for the replacement parts to arrive?
In other words, would I be risking damage to other critical components such as the engine (given the cylinder misfire and lean fuel trim conditions)?
Continued running with those codes could make the computer adjustments off, leading to catalytic converter failure. (don't ask me how I know)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just got the wrong parts from Amazon. They sent 06A103221AF instead of 058 133 784 AF.

The tape job is holding up more or less. Am sure it's not 100%, but no errors came up since. 200km driven.

Can I use a fuel or gas line hose instead, if I can find the right size to improve on top of pen and duck tape.
 

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In such cases you can also use Black RTV (or Grey for high temp) to repair the torn hoses. I've done it with great success on several occasions and after many years they still hold pretty good.
 

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Just got the wrong parts from Amazon. They sent 06A103221AF instead of 058 133 784 AF.

The tape job is holding up more or less. Am sure it's not 100%, but no errors came up since. 200km driven.

Can I use a fuel or gas line hose instead, if I can find the right size to improve on top of pen and duck tape.
Fuel injection line or some of the better fuel line would work. Not sure of the size, but it generally is strong enough not to collapse under vacuum.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@Emry I do have black rtv silicon. Didn't even think of it as a solution to this problem. But I am guessing another part of the hose might crack. It's old rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How about silicon radiator hoses? I bought a set a year ago for my motorcycle. I only needed to replace the main radiator hose. Didn't replace the rest, so I have a few different sizes that I might be able to repurpose for this.

Fuel injection line or some of the better fuel line would work. Not sure of the size, but it generally is strong enough not to collapse under vacuum.
 

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I don't know as I have never seen them. I know silicon vacuum line works great, but I don't know if the radiator hoses have enough resistance to collapse under vacuum.
 
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