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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!
Im on a tight budget and need new brake pads and rotors.
Ive never done it before, but after a few youtube videos, it looks quite easy.

I have a 2004 Passat 4-Motion 2.8l v6
Here is the door shot!


So here is the 2 brake sets i found on ebay that i think are for my car. Which one is the best/one i need?
First set
Second set (This one states that its for a 4-motion AWD)

I just wanted to check with the pro's so i know im buying the right stuff!
Thanks in advance!
 

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First advice is not to buy any important part on eBay. Beyond that, look at an online seller like ECS Tuning, German Auto Parts, Blauparts, or AutohausAZ. In a pinch for cheap parts (not that I recommend cheaping out on brakes) even local stores like Autozone can supply disks and rotors.

Oh, and for street use forget the stupid "drilled and/or slotted" rotors. They'll actually reduce braking effectiveness and are more likely to crack or warp. Concentrate on good quality parts of conventional design.
 

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In answer to your question, the second listing is what you would want. Your front pads have wear sensors which are on the pads in the second listing. Also in the second listing you get ceramic pads which will be very low on dust, easy on the rotors and should be very quite as well, the metallic pads would be noisy, wear your rotors faster and generally metallic pads preform better with heat in them.

Now that said, I agree with what Scott says above. Cheap parts are usually cheap parts and you will end up replacing them sooner, so it is a false economy. Not to mention that braking is one of the most critically important safety items on your car, so don't mess around with cheap parts!

Why not replace them in stages and spend a little more for quality parts? Replace the rears first because Passats have rear biassed brakes so the rears wear much faster than the fronts. First thing to do before buying anything is to see what condition your pads are in now. Pull the wheels and measure the pad thickness including the backing plates the minimum thickness is 7mm. Be sure to check the inner and outer pads as sometimes the inner pad will wear faster than the outer pad.

Now when you get ready to do the brakes you also need to flush the brake fluid and replace it with new dot4 full synthetic fluid. This should be done every two years because brake fluid is hygroscopic so it absorbs moisture from the air and degrades over time.

Also be aware a special tool is required to turn the rear brake caliper pistons back in. Failure to do this correctly will destroy your calipers. You can borrow the tool from most auto parts stores even if you don't buy your brake parts from them or buy it at Harbor Freight.

Now back to the brake rotors and pads. you can also check out http://www.passatworld.com/forums/vendor-marketplace/190277-pbr-axxis-brake-pads-ultimate-metal-master-deluxe-plus-extremely-low-dust.html.
IMPORTRP is a passatworld supporter and gives us good pricing on brake parts and other parts as well. You can send him a PM and he will put together a package for you to fit your needs.
As for what to buy that as been discussed here almost as much as what oil should I use. There are lots of great braking options out there.
If I were you I would go with Meyle coated rotors and a OE style pad. Pagid, ATE, PBR deluxe. And remember your front pads have wear sensors.

This is a very easy DIY project and there are several good DIY guides to help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I cant thank you guys enough for the advice.
After going to my local autozone, i can walk out with all 4 disc and rotors for ~$190.
I planned on getting that caliper set from harbor freight and a floor jack. I have a few 20% off coupons. I figure it will save me on brakes over the years.
I totally understand what your saying about the cheap ebay parts, even though i did buy that crank case breather hose off ebay.
Thanks once again 2002 for the part ID.
And thank you scotts13 for the good advice before i jumped and impulse buy some piece of junk off ebay.

2002- Do i "really" need to bleed the brake fluid? Cant i just open my brake fluid cap and leave the line connected to the caliper?
 

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You will still be saving money on your first brake job even with the purchase of a few tools like the jack and the caliper tool set. HF also has jack stands at a good price so pick up a pair when you buy your jack. Always use jack stands and never trust any jack while working on your car! Jack and jack stand placement is a bit tricky on the Passat and of course their is a DIY for that as well. I will find it later and post it here for you.

2002- Do i "really" need to bleed the brake fluid? Cant i just open my brake fluid cap and leave the line connected to the caliper?
Yes, you are correct in the fact that you can do the brake job by just taking the cap off of the reservoir to turn the caliper pistons back into the calipers. But, you need to completely flush your brake fluid every two years. To do this you still leave the brake lines connected to the calipers because their is a bleeder screw on each caliper. If someone else doesn't get to it, I will post you a DIY later today.
 

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Here is the information on bleeding/flushing your brakes and jacking points. For the brake fluid flush you need to bleed/flush in the following order after you have completed installing your new rotors and pads. Flushing order is:
1st- Right Rear
2nd- Left Rear
3rd- Right Front
4th- Left Front
The amount of fluid you need to flush through each caliper to completely flush the system is .2ltrs or 7ozs.
The best method to use is a pressure flush second best is the pedal flush and lastly the vacuum method.
I would Highly recommend you investing in a Pressure flush like the Motive flusher or ECStuning.com has thier own version of the same thing. I would borrow the rear brake tool form Autozone instead of buying it and put the money toward the pressure flusher. You will get more use out of the pressure flusher over time so it is a better use of your money. The brake tool will be obsolete in a few years as newer cars with electronic parking brakes require an electronic tool to turn the piston back into the caliper.
Either way you go you will need a couple feet of 1/4" ID Clear PVC tubing (Home Depot) to connect to the bleeder on the caliper and then run it into a bottle. Again, I use a Clear water bottle with a hole in the cap to accept the hose. Everything is clear so you can see bubbles in the fluid. Bubbles are bad, so you want to keep flushing until you have a good clean stream of fluid with no bubbles. It's always best to keep the end of the hose in the bottle at the bottom under a bit of fluid so you do not suck air back into the tubing. I make the bottle every 7oz so I know when I have flushed enough. You can also look for clean fluid in the hose.

Read through the info and post any questions you have. It's all easy if you take your time and don't try to rush.

Oh, by the way brake fluid will ruin your paint!!

How to bleed the brake and clutch fluid on B5 Passat and Audi TDI | VW TDI forum, Audi, Porsche, and Chevy Cruze diesel forum

Jacking Points

Jack points on 2005 B5.5 VW Passat TDI station wagon | VW TDI forum, Audi, Porsche, and Chevy Cruze diesel forum



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Yes, I'm a bit anal about keeping fluid from getting on anything.
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And just to round things out a couple videos on the pad and rotor changes. This is for an Audi A6 but same thing as the Passat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3WxNzVd6lA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDeAwJrDlZk
 

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I just did the rear pads and rotors in mine and I spent $75.00 from Advanced Auto parts. I used 2 coupons they sent me and I saved $45.00. They have a deal where you save 15% online and they sent you a coupon later for another $25 bucks off.
 
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