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526 Posts
What you are describing is the symptom of a small leak of raw gas in the engine bay.

I think the most likely areas too look at are the connections of the rubber fuel hoses to the metal fuel lines and injector rail, on top of the driver's side of the engine. The next place would be at each individual fuel injector connection and seal.

It only takes a small amount a gas to make a stink and the system is generally very tight, so finding an actual drip or puddle is pretty unlikely. The best approach may be to replace the components, starting with the injector O-ring seals, followed by the injector rail and hoses, if needed.
 

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2005 Passat Wagon, 1.8T, FWD
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308 Posts
Check the 2 metal fuel lines where they are clamped to the firewall, on the passenger side (right-hand side) of vehicle. Just above the Catalytic Converter/Exhaust line in the 1.8T and quite near the heater hoses going to the heater core.

There was a famous recall for these cracking and leaking or spraying gas around under pressure. In my case, it started slow with drips and light smell, then progressed to high-pressure spray around that area of the engine compartment, including the catalytic converter. I can't believe that my car and I did not go up in a ball of flame during that time.

What I learned from the dealer was that if the car was looked at for the recall back in the day and it wasn't leaking then,
they don't give a [email protected] about you and their cruddy design choices now. I find this dealer opinion appalling, but have to believe that it is the official policy of their overseeing Auto Group, to their shame.

I cut out the cracked open "crimp" in the offending line and replaced with high-pressure rubber fuel hoses and appropriate clamps. Use a tubing cutter, and be sure to use a flaring tool to put a bump on the end of the metal line, because without it those appropriate clamps can slip off the end of the metal lines and cause big leaks of their own. This is probably not an approved repair scheme, so use at your own risk!
 

· I wish I wasn't witless
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2,290 Posts
I cannot stress this enough:

These cars are now old, fuel lines have a finite lifespan-including the special lines that run from air pocket locations in the fuel tank-to the filler neck.

I just replaced the supply/return/filter lines in the back and they were not pretty. Change them all if you can, and remove the rear wheelhouse liners to check all of the lines for the filler neck and charcoal canister/vent system. Be sure to check the crimped metal ends-those rot out on the outside and no longer hold the hose to the internal barb fitting. An easy fix is to get a STAINLESS hose clamp and tighten down where the metal crimp used to be-especially since some factory-fit lines are NLA.

Side note: I’ve found lines in the engine bay to hold up far better than underneath due to less weather directly contacting them.


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