Volkswagen Passat Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Just when I was happy to have the timing belt and oil services complete before the cold weather set in... 2004 MY 1.9 TDI 4Motion; 340,000 KM (211,000 miles). Dry conditions/weather, approximately 5 C (41 F) initial speed 120 km/h (75 mph)

Today we jumped in the car to take a short (11 KM, 7 miles) trip and halfway through the trip I pulled over due to hearing a strange sound similar to traveling on a flat tire. As well as the flat tire sensation, there was also the sensation of one of the front wheels spinning through a rough spot some where in its revolution, which I could feel in the steering wheel. All tires appeared to be fine upon walking around the car so I took off to our destination. Upon arriving I again walked around and found the front driver wheel very hot to the touch and a smell also emitting from the same wheel. The rotor did not appear to be discolored nor was it a strong typical smell of brake/clutch burning smells. Rather a different kind of smell emitting from something rather hot.

After about two hours we returned home with out hearing the noise nor the hot wheel. Upon driving the car two more times this evening, nothing.

My thoughts...either the wheel bearing failed, heated up during the initial trip and then broke free or the caliper seized temporarily and somehow released. Due to the sound and the rotor not being discolored, I tend to think it is the wheel bearing. Due to the smell and heat, the caliper being the culprit is in the back of my mind. I know which I prefer it to be if it has to be something, considering I have never removed the pinch bolt on that side...

What are your opinions? Any and all appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
I guess the easiest thing would be raise the suspect side of the vehicle and try and turn wheel/tire. If you feel any grinding/play or hear any noise then probably the wheel bearing.
If you feel any drag on the wheel, you should be able to identify whether that drag is coming from a bad bearing or the brake caliper. If removal of the brake caliper is needed to check where the drag is ultimately coming from, that's an easy task. All it takes is a short bit of your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Andreas. The biggest problem is I am in a similar situation as you are with no close/personal place to wrench. I have to take the car to my FIL's to be able to do anything beyond adding fluids.

I plan on spending some time Monday checking out what raising and spinning results in. Mechanically the caliper is easier but economically the bearing is cheaper. I don't think rebuilding the caliper would cure a seizing problem. Unfortunately I don't have a bearing press or hub puller in my tool kit which is another thing I am not happy about. I will have to see if any of the local tool rental places actually offer these kinds of tools. I don't have the ability to go to the local parts store and rent tools like in the U.S. If we lived in Budapest I could actually rent garage time with an entire tool room at my disposal.

I'll post details Monday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
Thanks Andreas. The biggest problem is I am in a similar situation as you are with no close/personal place to wrench. I have to take the car to my FIL's to be able to do anything beyond adding fluids.
Yeah that is a huge problem. I don't know what your past situation was like, but I've have always had a place to do whatever I wanted. And for the last 2 years that has been one major dislike of my current situation.
They say, you never know how much you miss something until you don't have it anymore. SO TRUE.
Workbenches, tools, air compressor and space. Had it all. I own an air compressor that delivers 32CFM and I have to go down the street and pay money for one those stupid curbside air pumps that might get my tires up to 38lbs of pressure.

I don't know about you, but when I have to take my car somewhere and watch some plow-jockey turn wrenches on my car, knowing full well I can do everything this donkey can and probably better, ooh that just gets under my skin.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jjpark

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,234 Posts
It could be both at your mileage, but I would go with brakes first. I have never heard of a bearing going bad and then reverting to a noise-free condition
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
It could be both at your mileage, but I would go with brakes first. I have never heard of a bearing going bad and then reverting to a noise-free condition
I have, multiple times. Two of those were on my own vehicles. Most recently my 98 GLS. The drivers side rear bearing hub. Right before my move down here to Phoenix. The bearing started making howling noise, then got real tight. It would actually bring the car to a stop from slow coasting at a stop light. because of the situation at the time I was unable to change out the bearing. So I risked the trip to Phoenix. The howling noise went away and was replaced with a squeaking noise, only at very slow speed though, less than 10mph.
When I changed out that bearing hub I was amazed that the bearing never seized up. I still have that bearing hub in my toolbox by the way. It's proof this kind of thing happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Found out what was causing the issue...
100016


Time to order rebuild kits. I checked the passenger side and it is starting to rust as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
I would be cautious to rebuild.......the reason is I believe that a while back you did the brakes,and more than likely have compromised the bore tolerances.....when retracting them. Do not know what part situations;availability,costs are there, but not that expensive here in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The last time the brakes were done was unfortunately not by me but a friend of a friend of the wife's. Hence why the problem was not discovered.

When I actually remove the caliper I will check and make sure the bore hasn't been damaged before proceeding either way.

Either way is better than having to deal with a wheel bearing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,234 Posts
The last time the brakes were done was unfortunately not by me but a friend of a friend of the wife's. Hence why the problem was not discovered.

When I actually remove the caliper I will check and make sure the bore hasn't been damaged before proceeding either way.

Either way is better than having to deal with a wheel bearing!
If you need to get one in Austria or Germany, caliper is “Bremssattel” (brake saddle).

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
The last time the brakes were done was unfortunately not by me but a friend of a friend of the wife's. Hence why the problem was not discovered.

When I actually remove the caliper I will check and make sure the bore hasn't been damaged before proceeding either way.

Either way is better than having to deal with a wheel bearing!
You outa move to a rust free climate. Hint. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: PZ

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
:oops:

Yikes, that is crusty.
Was it even working?
It was working so well the inside pad is about 1/8" thinner than the outer. When I pulled back the boot I was surprised by the amount of debris trapped inside. Then upon closer inspection I found where the boot was compromised.

You outa move to a rust free climate. Hint. ;)
I have lived in numerous rust free environments, some by choice some through the divine wisdom of Uncle Sam. I have spent quite a bit of time in your current neck of the woods. All around Sierra Vista, Tucson, Phoenix and Lake Havasu.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
Those calipers are some nice eye candy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: axenstar
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top