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Just saw this cool video pop up on youtube:


did a quick search and turns out he's a member!
 

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Interesting to watch. You must give the guy credit for his technical/electrical knowledge (if he did it himself of course!). I would say, it had been a very expensive hobby but may be throughout the years of using the car he has recovered some of the cost on not spending on fuel.
 

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He got POTM a while back, maybe before he swapped the batteries.
 

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Here is the POTM thread. He updated that thread posting that video a couple of months ago, actually.

 

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I like that he used a manual transmission in conjunction with the electric motor. One thing that I'm not looking forward to in this supposed electric future is the demise of the manual transmission - I still want to "row my own".
 

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I like that he used a manual transmission in conjunction with the electric motor.
I'm not sure that his transmission really works. He says in the video that he has driven 90 MPH on the 2nd gear!!! That could not possibly be a real manual transmission. You can't go 90 MPH on 2nd gear on highway before toasting the whole thing.
 

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He shows how he shifts in the video. He's rev-matching to shift - I've done that with all my stick shift cars from time-to-time. Most recently, it was the only way I was able to get my 350Z home when the clutch hydraulic circuit failed on me last Fall on my evening commute o_O Stop-signs and red lights are tricky when that happens!

So, it seems like at first, he left the car in 2nd all the time. He mentioned that he changed the transmission fluid a lot, too, because of that. But he can also rev-match and shift to higher gears for highway cruising.

I don't really want an electric car. But, if I could get one coupled to a manual transmission, well, that would make it a little easier to accept.
 

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The electric motor spins faster and faster, so that is the rev - there is still an RPM to the motor.

So, for a manual transmission, there is still an optimum input-to-output ratio based on wheel speed.

However, it is my understanding that most electric cars have no transmission whatsoever, other than a final drive. The motor goes from 0 to maximum RPM, and the wheel speed changes with the RPMs. From what I've read, the first of modern era production electric vehicles with a changing ratio is the Porsche Taycan - I think it has a "2-speed" at the final drive ratio.
 

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I have a Nissan Leaf and I've ridden in Tesla's. There is no shifting and the only gearing I know of is a fixed ratio gear box. It's a neat feeling that you just push the accelerator and it goes faster and faster with no shifting. It's kind of fun once you get used to it.
 

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The only electric vehicle I've cruised in is my John Deere eGator - no gearbox there, either :)

Why I will always want a manual, as long as possible, is for the ability to push in the clutch pedal and disengage the motive force (engine, motor, what have you) from the driven wheels. There are foul-weather driving, vehicle breakdown, and other maintenance situations where I have found that capability invaluable. It can be simulated by bumping an automatic into neutral, but things like the finesse available for how power is reapplied as you let the clutch out in those situations - can't.

The computing power of each new generation of vehicle increases, and the capabilities afforded with that power (stability control, adaptive cruise control, semi-autonomous - and eventually fully autonomous - driving) increase as well. But I dread the day when I can no longer physically drive a stick shift (God-willing, may that day never come), or the market/regulations will no longer afford me an option to drive a manual transmission vehicle.

---

Whoa, this thread took a turn :LOL:
 

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People still drive Model T's so I'm sure there will still be gas-powered, gear-driven cars on the road for a long time. I'm on an EV forum and folks there seem to think all cars will be EV's in the not too distant future. I think the % of EV's will increase but it's about 1% or less now, IIRC, so it has a long, long, long way to go before gas cars are gone. I love my Leaf but I'm sure I'll have a gas car as well for the rest of my days.
 

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it has a long, long, long way to go before gas cars are gone.
Yes some people will own and maintain gas powered autos for a foreseeable future but only as collectibles, hobbyist, or antiques. I believe once the EV's range issue is solved, then the numbers will grow exponentially and demand for gas will drop fast. At that point, production and distribution of gas will be so uneconomical that switching to EV will be inevitable. In other words "switch or die".

My generation grow up with B&W TV, no internet, no mobile phones. The same is with the new generations. They grow up with EVs and are totally alienated with gas engines. Change is inevitable.
 

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I told my auto-mechanic brother to take all the EV courses he could at work, so I'm certainly on-board with the EV thing. Still, I think it will be at least a decade before internal combustion car sales are over-taken by EV sales. Even then, the existing gas cars will be around for decades afterwards.
 

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Even then, the existing gas cars will be around for decades afterwards.
If there are people who still drive on Model-T, then it's reasonable to believe the combustion engines will be around for the next several millennia to come. That number will be very low. In the next 10 years or so, EV will take over more than 95% of the market. But again, it all depends whether they can fix the technology to come up with long range drives w/o having to recharge the batteries. Or at least make the recharge time very fast.
 

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The electric motor spins faster and faster, so that is the rev - there is still an RPM to the motor.
The spin of the electric motor is different than the rev on gas engines. The electric motor spins can't be translated/replace the rev that is responsible for the shifting of the auto transmissions. Actually, shifting gears in EVs doesn't make must sense. The low/high gear and their power can all be achieved by the speed pedal.
 

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In the next 10 years or so, EV will take over more than 95% of the market.
I'll take that bet.

But again, it all depends whether they can fix the technology to come up with long range drives w/o having to recharge the batteries. Or at least make the recharge time very fast.
In other words, EV's need a miracle. Then the currently non-existent batteries would have to move from the lab into mass production. Then the infrastructure to replace the many (millions?) of gas station pumps with EV plugs and the electrical grid to support them would have to be built. I'd say it's a long shot at best.
 

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The spin of the electric motor is different than the rev on gas engines. The electric motor spins can't be translated/replace the rev that is responsible for the shifting of the auto transmissions. Actually, shifting gears in EVs doesn't make must sense. The low/high gear and their power can all be achieved by the speed pedal.
I get that shifting gears in an EV isn't necessary, but the spin of the motor still translates through a final drive to the wheel speed, and wheelspeed will vary with revolutions of the electric motor. So there is an RPM, counted with each turn of the motor - it's just not as relevant (to power curve, max RPM, etc.) as with an engine.

In the case of etischer's e-Passat (awesome feat of engineering, BTW!), the manual transaxle was utilized for the final drive translation of the motor revs to wheel speed.

When it comes to my own electric vehicle, I have a spare eGator that I need to get running again. It needs new batteries (about $1200 worth of lead-acids) and the motor controller needs to be repaired. I'm tempted, based on another's conversion I found online, to instead swap in better battery power - supplied from a wrecked Nissan Leaf - and make the charging and motor controller changes to accommodate those newer batteries.
 
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