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Diesels better than hybrids, VW chief says
Jan 06, 2005
The Detroit News

Volkswagen AG Chief Executive Bernd Pischetsrieder challenged the auto industry's emerging penchant for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles, saying diesel cars and trucks are a better way to curb pollution and fuel use.
VW, the largest producer of diesel-powered cars and light trucks, is developing advanced diesel engines and fuels that emit less carbon dioxide and offer better fuel economy than gasoline-electric hybrids.

"Any significant reduction of fuel consumption under all conditions requires diesel technology," Pischetsrieder said in a speech Wednesday at the Los Angeles Auto Show. "Volkswagen is uniquely positioned to lead in this area."
He said hybrids -- which rely on gasoline and electric motors -- only provide meaningful fuel savings when motorists are in stop-and-go driving situations.
"On the highway, they use substantially more fuel than modern diesels, and they cost more to produce," Pischestrieder said
California and some other states are forcing automakers to develop vehicles that emit less pollution. Last year, California accounted for 42 percent of all hybrid sales.

Because of strict pollution rules that limit harmful emissions, such as soot, the sale of diesel-powered vehicles are banned in California, the nation's largest auto market, and in New England.
Demand for hybrids may rise to 3 percent of U.S. auto sales by 2011, up from less than 1 percent now, J.D. Power & Associates estimates.
Diesel passenger vehicles may increase to as much as 15 percent in a decade from about 3 percent now, said Anthony Pratt, an analyst at the Westlake, California-based firm.

Diesel vehicles represent about 10 percent of VW's U.S. sales, Pischetsrieder said. That percentage will grow, he said. "We will promote and advertise diesel engines because we think they are the wave of the future," he said.
 

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Damn...Sharky said everything I planned on saying. Damn him! (The NOx emissions will cme down when the sulfur is gone and catalysts for NOx are installed)
 

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I agree. I think that gas/electric hybrids are not viable except for urban commuters who carry nothing more than their groceries. I'd like to see a dragrace between two hybrids each carrying 4 adults. :sleep: I could use the nap. I would hate to drive one in the mountains around here. Up. Down. Up. Down. Some of the hills I drive every day would be 2nd gear @ 25 mph. I couldn't even imagine the Rockies. A 50 mpg TDI with a 100 hp sounds more functional and ecological to me.
 

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B5V said:
VW is acutally working on just that...a diesel hybrid. Pichetsreider in one interview even admitted to such an engine is in the works.
That seems like a very good combination... the diesel is efficient at low-rpm torque and the electric is efficient at high-rpm power. :thumbup:

...I wonder if VW is pursuing the "parallel/twin-engine" method, like the toyota prius, or the "serial/electrically-driven flywheel", like the honda accord?
 

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Hybrids Getting Hotter

Ford’s Phil Martens better be bullish about HEVs, considering he and his team are now on tap to bring at least five hybrids to market in the near future. And even some makers less than enthusiastic about dual powertrain technology seem to find themselves caught up in the momentum. Volkswagen Chairman CEO Bernd Pischetsrieder and reversed his previous opposition and has told his engineers to move ahead on a hybrid diesel program. Last year saw Americans snap up 88,000 hybrid vehicles, according to the California market research firm, J.D. Power & Associates. This year, the tally is expected to top 222,000. That’d still be a modest 1.3 percent of anticipated U.S. new vehicle sales. But by 2010, the hybrid surge could top 500,000, Power forecasts, and three percent of the market. Some observers think that number is too conservative. But several factors will influence just how much sales will surge. “Product,” says Martens, “is what will drive the market.” Perhaps as much as another fuel crisis, some observers believe. But there are some caveats, according to Ford Chief Operating Officer Jim Padilla. With a premium averaging at least $3000 over comparable, gasoline-powered vehicles, hybrids “face an affordability issue,” he said, and the fuel-efficient technology will require incentives – in the form of state and federal tax breaks – to help subsidize customer demand.

http://thecarconnection.com/index.asp?article=7951&sid=176&n=156
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Yep, with the MBZ GST Vision diesel hybrid coming out surely VW will push through with their affordable diesel hybrid version.

If I do get a hybrid car..it will surely be diesel fed.:thumbup:
 

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Pischetsrieder said:
He said hybrids -- which rely on gasoline and electric motors -- only provide meaningful fuel savings when motorists are in stop-and-go driving situations.
"On the highway, they use substantially more fuel than modern diesels, and they cost more to produce," Pischestrieder said.
I won't argue too much, but this is an oversimplification. Weight, and aerodynamic drag play a significant role too.... And cylinder cut-off has made a big leap to close the gap in cruising efficiency for gas engines. Just compare the Accord V6 with and without cylinder cut-off (in the Hybrid): 30 vs 37 mpg. And the Hybrid version weighs more.

Pischetsrieder said:
"Any significant reduction of fuel consumption under all conditions requires diesel technology," Pischetsrieder said
What if someone ONLY drives in town? A Hybrid (or better yet, and EV) would be a good choice.
 

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Antoddio said:
Volkswagen AG Chief Executive Bernd Pischetsrieder challenged the auto industry's emerging penchant for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles, saying diesel cars and trucks are a better way to curb pollution and fuel use.

Well this guy has to step up to the plate and champion this. In terms of what's happend in the past. The best product doesn't always win, history tells you that.

This is where this Chief can earn his pay. Get people excited, get industry technologist to agree. Start to make a change. With the Fuel efficient Diesels that Audi and VW have, this is their direction to loose. The future is in there hands.
 

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pete1 said:
That seems like a very good combination... the diesel is efficient at low-rpm torque and the electric is efficient at high-rpm power. :thumbup:

...I wonder if VW is pursuing the "parallel/twin-engine" method, like the toyota prius, or the "serial/electrically-driven flywheel", like the honda accord?
They would be smart to mimic the Accord. It is a great design.

Actually faster than the standard V6.
 

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Chrysler had a diesel hybrid several years ago, in an Intrepid. But the marleting gurus couldn't find an audience for it then.
I recall it getting amost 50 mpg - which for a large car is damn good.
As far as advertising a diesel, notice how VW never mentions the word diesel in its adverts anymore .. only "TDI"? Back in 97/98, it was run as an engine that " ... doesn't start sound or smell like any diesel you've known".
 

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"On the highway, they use substantially more fuel than modern diesels, and they cost more to produce," Pischestrieder said
That makes sense, since don't the hybrids use the electric motor just to spin up to speed then switch to the gas motor?

Anyway, I'm a lot more comfortable with Herr P at the helm of VW.
From what I've read, he's a leader that capable of doing some good things.
Rudolf Diesel must be smiling...
 

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Der Meister said:
That makes sense, since don't the hybrids use the electric motor just to spin up to speed then switch to the gas motor?
...

No. Think of the electric motor as a turbo, or super charger. It is designed to assist the engine at higher loads (judged from throttle input) such as acceleration. It is always available. Unless the battery is used up, that is. This is a temporary condition from too much fun. It also only happens in a manual transimission hybrid since the controllers in a CVT version will route power automatically to the battery if necessary.

That's why there is little input at steady cruising speeds, and little benefit. It is running on the internal combusion engine only, albeit using a small portion of it's capacity.

The electric motor is also used as a starter, so I guess you are partly correct.
 
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