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2002 Volkswagen Passat Wagon GLX 4Motion
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Discussion Starter #1
Here's the code she throws in VAG.Com-Lite.


Bought the car three weeks ago. It died on the ride from Rockaway NJ to North Brunswick...Feels a lot like fuel starvation but I would like to be sure before I buy a pump and filter. The car cranks and will start and run for a few seconds on sprayed ether - starter fluid...She occasionally runs for a few seconds...Never more than 5 seconds on her own.
I am pulling the plugs in the morning and doing compression tests. Is there a fuel flow test that I can perform while I am that deep into it?

Thanks in advance!
 

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in dire need of an organic chemistry lesson
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Check the fuel filter which is located in the trunk and make sure its working. Also check its fuse and fuel regulator.
 

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Check the fuel filter which is located in the trunk and make sure its working. Also check its fuse and fuel regulator.
You mean fuel pump? The fuel filter is underneath, in front of the passenger side rear wheel.
 

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in dire need of an organic chemistry lesson
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You mean fuel pump? The fuel filter is underneath, in front of the passenger side rear wheel.
Yes that was a typo. Fuel pump is correct (this is due to longevity of quarantine that brain starts eating itself).
 

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Electrical guy here... my favorite (lazy) way of checking the fuel pump is to measure resistance between ground and fuel pump fuse (#28) (load side), i.e. you're measuring the resistance of the pump motor (with key off). Resistance should be around 10 ohms, if memory serves. A bad pump will measure open circuit, or at least thousands of ohms.

A good (several ohms) reading doesn't guarantee the pump is good, but a high resistance almost certainly means it's bad. This test only takes a couple of minutes and doesn't get your clothes dirty.
 

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Fuel pump on the 4mo is under the back seat, right side. You must have the tank down to 1/4 or less as it will pour out into the car if higher. A bad pump will often die after running for a while, then start again when it cools (I've had a couple).
 

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A bad pump will often die after running for a while, then start again when it cools (I've had a couple).
That's actually the main reason I almost never let my tank empty below half. The fuel cools down the pump and low level of fuel in the tank causes shorter life time for that thing.
 

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2002 Volkswagen Passat Wagon GLX 4Motion
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Electrical guy here... my favorite (lazy) way of checking the fuel pump is to measure resistance between ground and fuel pump fuse (#28) (load side), i.e. you're measuring the resistance of the pump motor (with key off). Resistance should be around 10 ohms, if memory serves. A bad pump will measure open circuit, or at least thousands of ohms.

A good (several ohms) reading doesn't guarantee the pump is good, but a high resistance almost certainly means it's bad. This test only takes a couple of minutes and doesn't get your clothes dirty.
I pulled up the rear floor and tested the resistance at the two pins. [the good demo of this was on youtube but the guy tested a 2004 which has four pins] 29.8-30.0 ohms on a 200 ohms scale. I have a 2000 Passat also in the driveway...I'm gonna test that pump and swap if working and the connectors look right.

[Update: 17:32} Lifted the cover on the fuel pump access on my 2000 Passat...No joy(?) Different connector and much LARGER ACCESS hole...The callout for the 2000 part is 8E0906087D, while the 2002 is 8E0906087E. Are the differences relevant?
 

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The E revision is for 4Mo vs the D for FWD, but I expect the resistance should be the similar if not the same.
 

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Are the differences relevant?
Why would you buy a part with a different number no matter how that difference in insignificant?
The most logical and safest choice is to buy the part that has the exact number.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Why would you buy a part with a different number no matter how that difference in insignificant?
The most logical and safest choice is to buy the part that has the exact number.
Not buying...Just seeing if feasible to swap the pump from my 2000 V6 Passat to the 2002 V6 w 4Mo...Ordered a new pump from Amazon. Am now on to running down the why the PCV hoses look so different.

Thanks for your comment.
 

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Not buying...Just seeing if feasible to swap the pump from my 2000 V6 Passat to the 2002 V6 w 4Mo...Ordered a new pump from Amazon. Am now on to running down the why the PCV hoses look so different.
OK I see. For a quick testing I don't see any reason as why you should'nt be doing it.
 

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The FWD fuel tank is deeper where the fuel pump sits. You may be able to pull the pump basket apart and swap the actual pump from the plastic basket to the other car. Also, replace the fuel feed line above the pump to the outlet as it will often leak if just the pump section is replaced. Use submersible fuel line.
You can follow these directions:
 

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Here's the code she throws in VAG.Com-Lite.


Bought the car three weeks ago. It died on the ride from Rockaway NJ to North Brunswick...Feels a lot like fuel starvation but I would like to be sure before I buy a pump and filter. The car cranks and will start and run for a few seconds on sprayed ether - starter fluid...She occasionally runs for a few seconds...Never more than 5 seconds on her own.
I am pulling the plugs in the morning and doing compression tests. Is there a fuel flow test that I can perform while I am that deep into it?

Thanks in advance!
The fuel pump relay might be the issue, happened to me a few years ago.
 

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Is your car a 2.0t? Mine did something similar and it was the timing chain had broke. This type of motor is common in several models from Passat, A4, Tiguan, others. It has timing chain and timing belt on opposite sides of the motor. Its possible for the timing chain to break and it not be catastrophic. 1st pull your plugs and use a pressure gage to check compression in each cylinder. If you have no compression or very low comp. 180lbs=good. Next step is to pull the valve cover from this you can see if the timing chain is turning the camshaft. Timing belt turns intake cam, timing chain turns exhaust cam. Mine had broke and destroyed the VVT Sprocket, tensioner, broke head of the VVT sprocket bolt. The other sprocket drives the high pressure fuel pump which was also shot. Last the cover was so badly damaged i replaced it also. Its not a easy fix for a DIY. There is a class action suite for the 08-14 motors. Mine is 07. Im with another group waiting on settlement. 1st group won. This motor has know tensioner issues and my observation was that cold weather is a huge issue with causing extremely bad build up of sludge which stops oil from reaching the topend. Ive rebuilt too many of these and salvaged parts from the Upullit yards. They all have the same problem as far as I have seen. My 07 I rebuilt the whole motor, maybe mine as a exception but I found many faults due to poor manufacturing. Biggest issue was torque rates where so high that nothing comes apart without breaking. 1 last thing this motor is the type (interference) and they always bend valves if the timing altered while running. The biggest concern for me is that if the problems werent shoved under the rug it was something I could have fixed without huge expense or the massive headaches it caused for myself.
 

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Is your car a 2.0t? Mine did something similar and it was the timing chain had broke. This type of motor is common in several models from Passat, A4, Tiguan, others. It has timing chain and timing belt on opposite sides of the motor. Its possible for the timing chain to break and it not be catastrophic. 1st pull your plugs and use a pressure gage to check compression in each cylinder. If you have no compression or very low comp. 180lbs=good. Next step is to pull the valve cover from this you can see if the timing chain is turning the camshaft. Timing belt turns intake cam, timing chain turns exhaust cam. Mine had broke and destroyed the VVT Sprocket, tensioner, broke head of the VVT sprocket bolt. The other sprocket drives the high pressure fuel pump which was also shot. Last the cover was so badly damaged i replaced it also. Its not a easy fix for a DIY. There is a class action suite for the 08-14 motors. Mine is 07. Im with another group waiting on settlement. 1st group won. This motor has know tensioner issues and my observation was that cold weather is a huge issue with causing extremely bad build up of sludge which stops oil from reaching the topend. Ive rebuilt too many of these and salvaged parts from the Upullit yards. They all have the same problem as far as I have seen. My 07 I rebuilt the whole motor, maybe mine as a exception but I found many faults due to poor manufacturing. Biggest issue was torque rates where so high that nothing comes apart without breaking. 1 last thing this motor is the type (interference) and they always bend valves if the timing altered while running. The biggest concern for me is that if the problems werent shoved under the rug it was something I could have fixed without huge expense or the massive headaches it caused for myself.
Mine is a 2000 Passat with the 1.8T engine (boosted to 300 HP....FUN!) the 2.0 is pretty much the same and IS an Interference engine, to answer the original question, your engine is NOT a VR6 engine so it is NOT an interference engine, meaning your timing chain MAY be the issue, but, again, check your fuel pump relay as a possibility.
 

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Incorrect, both the 2.8 V6 (the only engine in the GLX 4Mo) and the 1.8T are interference engines. The non-turbo 2.0 in the older Golf and Jetta cars were not always interference engines, but could damage valves if the belt goes out at high rpm.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Is your car a 2.0t? Mine did something similar and it was the timing chain had broke...
Definitely NOT the timing belt...Good compression 180-195 each cylinder. Engine just will not 'stay lit'...Nothing in my posted VCDS-Lite readings point to why. Engine would 'turn over easy' but never light at all with the belt gone or snapped.

Culprits are fuel pump, fuel filter and fuel relay...I want it to be the fuel relay because that's the easiest to fix but we will see...
 

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Incorrect, both the 2.8 V6 (the only engine in the GLX 4Mo) and the 1.8T are interference engines. The non-turbo 2.0 in the older Golf and Jetta cars were not always interference engines, but could damage valves if the belt goes out at high rpm.
My info is directly from AllData, they say that the only V6 that is an interference engine is the VR6 and the 2002 Passat GLX 4Motion does NOT have the VR6 engine and thus is NOT an interference engine.
 
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