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Anyone know if Costco gas is any different than normal gas station gas (Exxon, Mobile, BP)? Costco is always a lot cheaper for regular and premium (they don't have a middle grade at my Costco). Is the Costco premium ok for 1.8T?
 

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I've always purchased Costco's premium and have never had an issue that I could detect. That said, can't say I've ever did a compare with another brand.
 

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It shouldn't be a problem. Of course I personally prefer something like chevron, the car just feels smoother (I might be bias about this). But it wouldn't cause you any problems using costco's.
 

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Punches Dubs. True Story
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Costco sources their petrol some various places including BP/Amoco, 76, Arco ...whomever. Wherever they can buy the cheapest barrel, they do. So, you are never getting the same fuel twice when you fill up at Costco.
 

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HurricaneFloyd said:
I hear that Costco doesn't use fuel additives but they change the filters on the pumps frequently. Is this true?
There was a guy on the old [email protected] listserv who worked for Sunoco. He said that most gas stations buy their base-stock locally. Transportation costs money, so they look for the closest vendor. They add ingredients to the base stock to achieve the desired octane rating. I'm not sure how much variance exists in what they use for additives, but it's probably mostly the same stuff.

Kenny
 

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Correct, most gas stations buy their base stock locally. On any given day costco's manager would purchase from the cheapest they could get that day. All base stock gasolines have the minimum requirements for detergents already added, so Costco for example would just be giving you that, the bare minimum gas. Nothing terribly wrong with that if that's what you want. Then stations like Shell or BP would add their additional detergents/additives to this base to meet their company requirements. Shell is a top tier company, meaning their gasoline must meet top tier requirements across all octane ratings and at every single shell station in the United States. I gladly pay the 10-20 cent premium to run Shell/BP vs Costco, and I also find it that I need to run fuel system cleaner far less often as well. Also the car runs smoother and gets better gas mileage, so I feel the extra money spent per gallon isn't wasted.
 

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Ive had no mpg change between using BP and Costco, along with not running any richer, less smooth, etc....gas is gas

Any significant change is totally psychological....all gas stations have to meet federal standards anyways, so each gas is AT LEAST to those standards. Costco can get away with charging less because they make up for it by allowing only members to fuel up.
 

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I can't speak to Costco but I always fuel up at my local BJs and have never had a problem - the car runs fine. BJs is a members-only store similar to Costco, though they do allow non-members to purchase gas but at a higher price (usually about .10 a gallon more for non-members).
 

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Not all gas is created equal. Do some reading on "top tier gas" before misleading others.

After running Arco for a couple months my car starting pinging like crazy at low RPM's (I drive a manual v6). I had to run Techron to clear it up. Now I stick to the top tier brands (Chevron, Shell, 76 in my area).

http://www.toptiergas.com/

Costco has explicitly said they only meet the minimum federal requirements. I used to run Costco since it was convenient and cheap, but now it's out of my way and after my latest experience with cheap gas I'd rather not gum up my engine and have to run a $10 bottle of fuel system cleaner every couple thousand miles. Plus, all those minutes waiting in line add up.
 

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glyphin said:
Not all gas is created equal. Do some reading on "top tier gas" before misleading others.

After running Arco for a couple months my car starting pinging like crazy at low RPM's (I drive a manual v6). I had to run Techron to clear it up. Now I stick to the top tier brands (Chevron, Shell, 76 in my area).

http://www.toptiergas.com/

Costco has explicitly said they only meet the minimum federal requirements. I used to run Costco since it was convenient and cheap, but now it's out of my way and after my latest experience with cheap gas I'd rather not gum up my engine and have to run a $10 bottle of fuel system cleaner every couple thousand miles. Plus, all those minutes waiting in line add up.
Could not have said it better myself! Like I said earlier, costco meets minimum federal requirements! If you feel the minimum is okay with you then go right ahead and use it! Top tier standards are much more stringent and obviously not easy to obtain as even BP and several other big names have not qualified.
 

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VWTreads said:
Could not have said it better myself! Like I said earlier, costco meets minimum federal requirements! If you feel the minimum is okay with you then go right ahead and use it! Top tier standards are much more stringent and obviously not easy to obtain as even BP and several other big names have not qualified.
But we're talking about a 15 cent difference in pricing. So youre saying that the "top tier" gasoline companies are meeting much higher standards of federal regulations, and somehow doing it and only having to increase their price of gasoline 15 cents to the consumer? Which would equal out to probably 5 cent increase of actual "products" after you factor in their profit.

The term "top tier" gasoline was created by the industry, specifically four carmakers (BMW, General Motors, Honda and Toyota), who developed higher standards for gasoline additives than the current EPA standard. Gasoline marketers who meet the Top Tier standard may then claim that they are "Top Tier".....

And the following article backs up my opinions further:

Does it really make a difference if I fill-up using the cheapest grade? If I'm driving a high-performance car like a Mercedes, Porsche or BMW , does using the lower-grade/cheaper gas hurt the car?

Answer #1: On the newer generation cars? Not necessarily...while some of the higher-performance engines do require a higher-octane gasoline for that maximum performance, but all of these new, computerized-cars are equipped with what are called "knock sensors" which automatically-if they detect "pinging" or "knocking"-which is usually caused by a lower-grade or lower-octane type gasoline, it automatically retards the timing in the engine to offset that.

So the worst that happens if you use a lower-grade/lower-octane gasoline is that you don't get quite the performance that you normally would if you used a higher-octane fuel. Bottom line? No substantial damage should occur to the car.

Knock sensors: Do all cars have them? How new are they? How far back do they go? The more sophisticated European sports sedans have had them since the mid-1980s; they're now incorporated in pretty much all of the computer-controlled cars from the mid-1990s and up. Earlier model cars-especially if it's a carburetor-type vehicle will absolutely not have anything like that.

Question #2: What about the quality of gas you'd buy from a "name brand" retailer, like Mobil or Shell for example-versus cut-rate sellers like Sam's Wholesale Club or Costco or regional bargain sellers that dot the nation. Are we at risk of putting lesser-grades or lower-quality gas that could end hurting our cars?

Answer #2: Not really. The quality of the gasoline today is regulated by the government; it has to meet certain standards...and name-brand is what most people go by because of their heavy advertising. The quality of gasoline really is not that much different anymore, no matter where you buy it.


But here's a tip that could save you some money on a visit to your friendly auto mechanic:

If you pull up to the gas station and see the tanker truck on the premises filling up their tanks, the smartest thing you could do is bypass them today and either go back tomorrow or find another gas station to fill up at right now. Why? Because anytime they re-fill these tanks up, any sediment that may have collected on the bottom of these big, underground tanks will get stirred up and it will get mixed in with the gasoline-something you want to avoid if at all possible. Sediment in your gas tank means clogged fuel injectors and poor performance, or even a visit to the shop.
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"You should buy gasoline at a station that sells a lot of gasoline. If a station turns over gasoline often, there is less time for water to accumulate in tanks from air condensation."

"There are differences between gasoline brands, at least for premium grades. Premium is the grade that oil companies use for bragging rights. Major oil companies do not lie about what their gasolines will do, but they often forget to make clear that their premium grade is the gasoline they are referring to in the advertisement. There are not many quality or performance differences between brands of regular-grade gasoline. One reason for this is that the EPA and American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) set standards for regular fuel that are relatively high."

"Distribution methods also limit gasoline differences because, for the most part, oil companies must begin with the same gasoline. The days of each branded station selling gasoline that came from the parent company's refinery ended years ago when pipelines became the major transportation method for gasoline. Now, refineries make gasoline that meets a national specification for each grade and type. That gasoline is pumped out into a pipeline system where that fuel could end up in a competitor's tank because of the timing of demand versus supply into the lines. Detergents are then added at the terminal when the fuel is pumped into tanks or into trucks. So, detergent is the major difference between brands of gasoline and that difference is seen mainly in premium brands."

"Base gasoline is identical. At a typical loading facility, you may see a truck loading Chevron gasoline next to one loading Shell, Texaco, or even unbranded gas. The difference is in the additives. When a driver enters a customer number at the terminal, the computer system recognizes it as a specific branded destination and will automatically inject the additive specific to that customer. Chevron adds Techron, Texaco adds Techroline, and some locations blend 10% ethanol."

"The only significant difference between regular, mid-grade, and premium gasoline is that premium-grade fuel will have higher octane rating than mid-grade fuel and mid-grade fuel will have a higher octane rating than regular-grade fuel. At many gas stations there is also a difference in the amount of additives between the grades. In most cases these additives are designed to keep harmful engine deposits from developing in your engine's combustion chambers."
 
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