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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Complete 1.8T PCV System DIY (AEB)

In looking through the information base & over the many PCV-related threads, I found a few write-ups on the PCV system for a 1.8, but I didn't find any that were complete, so I created a new one with as much information as I had. If your PCV system is having issues, you will also want to check your valve cover gasket, cam seals, & cam chain tensioner, as these items can be affected by a malfunctioning PCV system (ask me how I know).


Parts Required:
(4) 058-905-291 check valve
(1) 034-129-101-B "puck"
(1) N-904-673-01 breather tube seal
(1) 058-103-213 breather tube
(1) 06A-103-247 bleeder valve housing
(1) 035-103-245-A bleeder valve

Additional partlist sources by Engine Code:
pete1 said:
You will also need various sizes of screw-type clamps. You will need 8 of the same size for the 058 valves & a few other sizes for the remaining clamps.
I bought two packages of 5/16" - 7/8" (AutoZone KE-6SS) clamps for the 4 check valves & two packs of multiple-sized clamps for the rest. You could bring
the parts with you & guage what sizes you will need.


Tools Required:
Straight/Phillips screwdrivers - to tighten down new screw clamps & move coolant reservoir
Cutters/dremel - to get old one-time clamps off


Step 1. Change the 058 check vlaves:

There are four 058 check valves on an AEB. To change them, simply cut off the one-time use clamps, remove the old check valve, put on new hose
clamps, and put the new check valve in place. To gain access to the ones below the intake and throttle body, remove the three screws holding the
coolant reservoir in place, remove the coolant level sensor from the bottom of the reservoir, & lean it forward & out of the way.
Locations of check valves:

One to the rear of the airbox:


One between the intake & coolant reservoir:


One below the intake manifold (on the left you will see the check valve below the throttle body):


One below the throttle body:


There is also a T-fitting below the intake manifold that split on mine. I used a 5/16" T-fitting from AutoZone to replace it, as it is a generic
part. Also in this picture you can see the 058-103-213 breather tube where it attaches to the breather assembly. This picture will help you locate
it later in the DIY.







Step 2. Change the 034 puck valve:

This information is from Spirare's write-up. It's farily straightforward - take the old 034 valve out & put the new one in. My 99 already had screw-type
clamps & not one-time use clamps. The only addition I have to his comments below is that you should remove the N75's wiring before doing this - it
will give you a few extra mm (you can see the N75 wiring harness on the right in the second picture - just push in on the retaining clip & pull the
harness out).









Step 3. Replace the breather tube, PCV valve, & T-fitting:

This procedure would probably be quite easy if you remove the intake manifold, but that is an adventure in itself. I did it with the intake in place,
and it was a PITA as there is only enough room to get one hand in the area. It's almost impossible to get a clear shot of the PCV assembly due to the
many hoses in the area, so do a visual inspection of the area directly below the intake manifold before attempting to replace these items.

To remove the breather tube, pull the green retaining spring (see first picture below) upwards then pull the tube off of the breather assembly. I used
some long needle nose pliers between the intake tubes to remove it. Remove the clamps from the rear of the T fitting & the end of the bleeder valve,
remove the T fitting from the rear breather tube (#9 in the Bently image below), remove the hose from the bleeder valve (which goes to the vacuum booster
behind the intake manifold), & remove the entire assembly from the car.

What you will be installing:


Breather tube attached to breather assembly:


Here is a pic from above which shows the breather tube & retaining clip:


Here's a shot of the old breather tube. You can't really tell, but there's enough gunk in it to restrict it to about 50% efficiency.


This shows the breather tube removed from the breather assembly. You have to push the new breather tube firmly in to fully seat it. If it's not
seated all the way, the retaining clip will not fully engage.


The old & new PCV assembly. I used the old one as a guage to correctly setup the new one & tighten the clamps:


Push the T fitting onto the long breater tube & tighten the clamp. Push the hose from the vacuum booster onto the bleeder valve & tighten the clamp.
Push the breather tube into the hole on the breather assembly, fully seat it, & re-install the retaining spring.


Diagrams:

Item #6 is the 034 puck valve


Item #s 2, 3, 5, & 6 are the items replaced in Step 3 (along with clamp #s 7, 8, & 11).


Parts Sources:
www.autopartsnationwide.com - I bought everything here - much cheaper than the dealer & you can pay through paypal. :thumbup:
Richie at AutoBarn can also source these parts.
 

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This is what I have been looking for - Thanks! Before you did the parts under the intake, what were your symptoms? (vacuum at idle, group 032 for idle, etc)
 

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Yes, very nice write up indeed! I too want to know why you did this work? What symptom were you having? I have already replace one of the check valves and the PCV "puck" valve.

I too have a '99 1.8T and want to hear the why behind this work.
 

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Nice writeup. The ATW engine PCV system looks almost identical, not sure if the part numbers are. The ATW check valves and vacuum lines are slightly different.

As for the why,there are several reasons:

The PCV ventilates the crankcase vapors that would otherwise condense and foul the oil. Gas,oil and water vapors are present in the crankcase of the engine.

The pressure in the crankcase has to go somewhere. If not thru the PCV system,it will find a way out. Leaking valve cover gaskets,unseated and leaking oil dipsticks and leaking cam seals can result.

There may be problems the engine performance/idling if the valve is stuck open from crud in the valve.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
^^ Exactly. My idle was fine, bt I just replaced my cam seals & valve cover gasket & they started leaking AGAIN. Now, no more leaks.

:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Also wanted to add that I cleaned out the long breather tube with some injector cleaner & let it dry before putting it back on. There was a ton of crap that came out of it & now I'm off to auto-rx this weekend. :thumbup:
 

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Excellent, comprehensive writeup!

In my case, was getting engine/oil smell inside the car. Main problem was a large crack in the breather tube.
 

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we need something similar for a 2002+ V6 (with the 'new' PCV system)!!
I tried changing mine but it s QUITE different from the exisiting writeup on the info_base :(
 

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Discussion Starter #12
katone said:
we need something similar for a 2002+ V6 (with the 'new' PCV system)!!
I tried changing mine but it s QUITE different from the exisiting writeup on the info_base :(
I'm supposed to help a bud do his v6 next weekend. If that comes through, I'll take pics & make one (or edit this one) for the V6.

:thumbup:
 

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StewPidass0 said:
I'm supposed to help a bud do his v6 next weekend. If that comes through, I'll take pics & make one (or edit this one) for the V6.

:thumbup:

:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

hopefully your friend's V6 is a late 2002 or later: as I posted here (& Glucks confirmed), the PCV on my 2003 v6 is different than Ashman's 99 v6..

looking forward to this DIY! cheers! :beer:
 
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