Volkswagen Passat Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I had clicking during turning on my 99 Passat V6 Manual, took it to dealership who replaced axles with aftermarket ones. They also did a timing belt maintenance and rear brakes.

I've had many problems since they worked on my car and most recently after taking it for a long drive it started shaking when I would accelerate and do that intermittently. It was a bumpy highway and sometimes the car would be fine and then the whole thing would start to shake, stemming from the front - I think.

Anyone have any ideas as to what is going on? I really need help because I can't put my faith in this particular dealership. They are really bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,541 Posts
I currently have a similar problem. It isn't tire related as I changed by tires and wheels over and it is still there. I am guessing that I have a bad engine mount or undertight subframe bolt or some such. When I get on the gas it just shakes. The sunroof slider rattles I get a stomach ache. It's going in for this. The diagnostic will be too much a PITA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
don't forget about a dirty throttle body...if the TB has a lot of carbon, gas won't get to the engine, causing a similar shake. There's a TB-cleaning post on here; discover it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,975 Posts
Double check the lugnuts. Make sure they are torqued to the right spec.
Grease the lug bolts as well. You can't torque them to the proper spec if they're dry and rusty, because they'll bind against the rim, making it SEEM like they've been torqued properly.

I did this on my car after I changed the brakes a few days ago, and then I used my normal highly precise torquing method (standing on the lug wrench -- they come out to 150ft-lbs every time!), and several little inaccuracies and noises that used to come from my front suspension are gone.
 

·
Retired PassatWorld Staff
Joined
·
6,165 Posts
Grease the lug bolts as well. You can't torque them to the proper spec if they're dry and rusty, because they'll bind against the rim, making it SEEM like they've been torqued properly.

I did this on my car after I changed the brakes a few days ago, and then I used my normal highly precise torquing method (standing on the lug wrench -- they come out to 150ft-lbs every time!), and several little inaccuracies and noises that used to come from my front suspension are gone.
Although I don't dispute the accuracy of your torque (hard to argue against physics... assuming you did the math right), but if it is 150 ft.lb... that's 62 ft.lb (66%) too much. FYI

Either loose weight or use a shorter lever... I'll let you do the math.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top