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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Excellent write-up and awesome pics by Passaturbonium.

PLEASE READ: Do at your own risk.
I make no guarantee regarding the above procedures and am not
responsible for any brake problems, accidents, etc.

IMPORTANT: Rusty made a good point which is not in this how-to that I noticed in the Haynes manual. You can open the reservoir for the brake fluid to hold the extra fluid when you compress the pistons as described in this how-to or you can follow the Haynes directions which are listed following: To make room for the new pads, the caliper piston must be pushed back into the cylinder. Either use a piston retraction tool or a C-clamp. Connect a brake bleeding kit to the caliper bleed screw. Open the bleed screw as the piston is retracted; the surplus brake fluid will then be collected in the bleed kit container. Remember to tighten the bleed screw as soon as the piston is retracted to prevent air from being drawn into the system.



Also please don't do this with jack holding your car up invest 10 bucks and do it safely!

This brake job was done on 1999 B5 ROTOR/PADS INSTALL Front:

Tools needed:
-7mm allen key
-17mm wrench/rachet
-C clamp or large pliers
-jack stand (Autozone $10)

Parts needed:
-2 new rotors
-front brakepads
-brake quiet
-neversieze

Step 1
Take off the wheel.
Also open the brake reservoir. Sometimes when you retract the caliper it might overflow.
So put a rag around it also.

Step 2
Take the tension spring off


Step 3
Remove 2 black caps in the back of the caliper


Step 4
Remove 2 bolts, use 7mm allen




Step 5
Press against the rotor and caliper to loosen it


Step 6
Slide off the caliper


Step 7
Remove old brakepads

Step 8
Remove 2 bolts and bracket, use 17mm rachet


Step 9
Remove rotor, it should slide right off, if not use a hammer to tap on it here and there.


Step 10
Apply neversieze


Step 11
Apply new rotor


Step 12
Reattach the bracket: torque to 92 ft-lbs


Step 13
Retract the piston using big pliers or C-clamp



Step 14
Apply brakequiet on the back of new brakepads


Step 15
Apply brakepads, as shown in the picture


Step 16
Slide on the caliper


Step 17
Reapply the hex bolts, you need to torque these to 18 - 22ft/lbs.


Step 18
Replace the plastic caps


Step 19
Replace the tension spring


Done

Rear:

Tools needed:
-13mm wrench
-15mm wrench
-caliper retract tool-VW tool is cheaper
you can also use needle pliers but it takes longer and its more PITA.

Parts:
-Rear rotors
-new brakepads

Note: You are going to need put something under front tires cause you can't have the E-brake on.

Step 1
Take the wheel off.
Also open the brake reservoir. Sometimes when you retract the caliper it might overflow.
So put a rag around it also.

Step 2
Unscrew the caliper bolts using 13mm wrench and 15mm to hold it in place




Step 3
Pull off the caliper


Step 4
Slide off the rotor, you do not need to remove the bracket, slide on new rotor.


Step 5
Retract the piston using either the tool or needle pliers. Screw and push clockwise


Step 6
Apply brakequiet to the back off the brakepads!


Step 7
Apply brake pads




Step 8
Slide on the caliper and screw in the bolts: torque to 22 ft-lbs





DONE

PLEASE READ!!! Make sure you pump your brakes few times before driving!!!They should go down all the way the first time you step on them. Just pump them up.

Good Luck
 

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One suggestion on the fronts...instead of using the channel locks to retract the piston directly, put the pad in and then use channel locks. The pad acts like a bearing so you have less chance of marring up the cylinder.
 

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Man, this is a great write-up. I used it this morning to do the front pads and rotors on my 1.8T (rears next weekend).

FYI, I found my bracket bolts were 18mm, not 17.

Clark
 

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WOw this is what I used a long time ago for my Wagon's brakes! Thank goodness it was found. I couldn't come across it when I needed torque specs this past rotor change!

Also I found something different from my 98 1.8T Wagon and the car I was working on previously- an 01 V6 GLX Sedan. The rear brakes have a different bolt? This almost seemed to be a torx on the V6... anyhelp?
 

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Just a question.
On s Klass 's rotor group buy, he stated that slotted rotors should be place so that the outside edge of the the slot hits the pad firts and the inside slot leaves the pad last. your rotors seem to be reverse of this. Are your rotors slotted or am I just seeing things?
Thanks for the clarification,
 

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I'm not sure why S_Klass said that - are you sure that's what he said? The way pictured is the more "correct" way, because whatever is being channeled by the slots (brake dust, water, etc.) will be directed to the outside of the rotor. However, either way works.

This is a great writeup, with really great step-by-step pics. I'll put it in the Info Forum, but there's a couple of things I'd like to see first:

1) Torque specs for all the bolts involved. This is important to a complete job.

2) It has recently come to my attention that compressing the calipers w/o releasing the brake bleed screw can damage the ABS unit. Yes, I've always done it w/o releasing the bleed screw - but not anymore.

So put these two items in the writeup, then I'll move it. Great Job! :thumbup: :salute:
 

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Rusty said:
2) It has recently come to my attention that compressing the calipers w/o releasing the brake bleed screw can damage the ABS unit. Yes, I've always done it w/o releasing the bleed screw - but not anymore.

Good point, how do you release the bleed screw?
 

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NIce write-up.:thumbup: Just a few additions.

Don't for get to make sure the pins for the front are well greased before re-inserting. Packets can be found at all auto parts stores for pennies.

Use a wire brush to clean the area around the caliper carriers (front and back)where the pads sit so that they move freely. Some antisieze on the carriers doesn't hurt either.

Bently manual recommends using locktite on the rear screws but I haven't and don't know about others.

A coat hanger works great to hold the front calipers while working.:lol:
 

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alex310 said:
Good point, how do you release the bleed screw?
Pull the dust boot off and then use a small crescent wrench to turn counterclockwise. Put a piece of 12" clear tubing over the bleed nipple so you have a column of fluid leaving the bleeder... this helps prevent air bubbles from working back up into the system.

You only need to open the bleeders a little bit, so they are dripping quickly... not enough to have fluid running out like a faucet.
 

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Rusty said:
I'm not sure why S_Klass said that - are you sure that's what he said? The way pictured is the more "correct" way, because whatever is being channeled by the slots (brake dust, water, etc.) will be directed to the outside of the rotor. However, either way works.
Actually if you look at the photo below (assuming clockwise rotation), the slots on the outside of the rotor will contact the pads first.


 

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S_Klass said:
Actually if you look at the photo below (assuming clockwise rotation), the slots on the outside of the rotor will contact the pads first.


Assuming clockwise rotation assumes that you are driving in reverse all the time...


Also when doing the rears you may want to pull apart the sliders and relube them before refitting all the pads and rotors. The sliders can sieze causing premature inboard side wear later.
 

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Spirare said:
Assuming clockwise rotation assumes that you are driving in reverse all the time...


Also when doing the rears you may want to pull apart the sliders and relube them before refitting all the pads and rotors. The sliders can sieze causing premature inboard side wear later.
LoL! Is that the other side of the car? I didn't walk out to my parking spot to look. :lol:
 

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The design of the slots really doesn't matter.

Your rotation should be determined by the vanes, not the slots.
 
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