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Discussion Starter #1
So i have to change my brakes and figured since I've got a 99 and I'm pretty sure the pads haven't been changed since 99 lol, I figured I'd do a pretty big overhaul. I want to change as much as I can but I can't seem to find a list of stuff that I need. So far I have:

- brake pads
- rotors
- brake fluid
- brake lines
- brake reservoir (mine got smashed somehow :/ )

Anything else? or can someone post a link to a parts list? Thanks!
 

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Parts-wise that's about it. By "brake lines" do you mean the flexible brake hoses? Usually not changed unless damage is apparent. The caliper slide pins will probably need to be cleaned and re-lubed, usually with a high-temp Lithium grease. You should have theadlocker (removable, usually Blue), and tools such as the common caliper piston retractor. For the rear calipers, you will need a special compress-and-rotate tool, often available for rent, or no charge, from the major auto parts stores. Brake parts cleaner spray, and plenty of old rags or paper towels too. Make sure that you have the usual metric sockets, hex drivers, box-end wrenches, etc.

I recommend that when you force the pistons back into the calipers, that you have an appropriate-sized hose stuck onto the bleeder barb, the other end in a container with enough brake fluid in it to submerge the hose end. Loosen the bleeder, then as the piston moves into the bore, old fluid will be forced through the hose into the container. Keep the bleeder pointing up as you do this, to be sure that any air bubbles in the caliper bore are pushed out. Tighten the bleeder when the piston stops moving.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Parts-wise that's about it. By "brake lines" do you mean the flexible brake hoses? Usually not changed unless damage is apparent. The caliper slide pins will probably need to be cleaned and re-lubed, usually with a high-temp Lithium grease. You should have theadlocker (removable, usually Blue), and tools such as the common caliper piston retractor. For the rear calipers, you will need a special compress-and-rotate tool, often available for rent, or no charge, from the major auto parts stores. Brake parts cleaner spray, and plenty of old rags or paper towels too. Make sure that you have the usual metric sockets, hex drivers, box-end wrenches, etc.

I recommend that when you force the pistons back into the calipers, that you have an appropriate-sized hose stuck onto the bleeder barb, the other end in a container with enough brake fluid in it to submerge the hose end. Loosen the bleeder, then as the piston moves into the bore, old fluid will be forced through the hose into the container. Keep the bleeder pointing up as you do this, to be sure that any air bubbles in the caliper bore are pushed out. Tighten the bleeder when the piston stops moving.
Ah! You are the best! Thanks for the info!!!
 

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seems good so far.....only caution is that if bleeding is necessary ,get a schwaben or equivalent pressure set up, with the age of your car,moisture in S.Fla. ,old original fluid (could use fresh fluid/flush)there is a good chance of corrosion at the end of the master cylinder, pushing pedal to floor/master cylinder piston with the manual bleeding procedure drives the master cylinder piston to end of it's travel often destroying it's seals.......
 

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and as YLWagon says push the old crap fluid in calipers out at caliper bleeder not allowing crap built up in calipers back into system, doing mine this weekend and almost forgot that part ,for some strange reason pads have worn outside to inside (reference as to rotor) at an angle?? weird!
 

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If you dont have access to a bleeder try an old trick....clear line....enough to reach from your back calipers to the hood. Small enough to fit over your brake caliper bleeder nipple and attach via a small t to pretty much any small vacuum port leading to your engine.

Push nipples on both ends...easier with 2 people. Start car and let it suck the fluid but dont let it get to to your engine. You can keep adding fluid as needed.

Once fluid gets close to your motor close nipple then turn off car, disconnect hose and blow the fluid out of tube....move on to next caliper if it's no longer pulling any air bubbles.
 

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I strongly recommend that you do NOT use vacuum on your brake system by any means.

Use the old pedal method.

or do as I did:

Parts required:
The cap from the old reservoir
Flex hose with fitting to connect to tyre valve at least 15" long. (as on a hand pump)
1 - 2 inch metal pipe (OD to fit hose above)
Clamp or cable tie
JB Weld
Spare wheel

Drill a hole through the center of the cap to fit the metal pipe. Remove and separate the parts inside the cap, JB Weld the plastic flat washer piece back in the cap making sure it seals to the cap all way round (note the notch in the cap), and glue the pipe into the cap. Attach the hose to the metal pipe with clamp or cable tie.
Fill the reservoir and fit the rubber seal washer in the cap and install the cap. release air from the spare wheel until it is between 10 psi and 15 psi (must not exceed 15 psi). Lay the wheel on the engine and connect the hose to the tyre valve.

Bleed the brakes in this order RR, RL, FR, FL (LHD US). Check fluid level after each wheel and make sure it doesn't get too low. Connect a clear bleed hose to the RR nipple and put the other end in a container to catch the old fluid, loosen the nipple and wait until the escaping fluid is clear, tighten the nipple. Repeat for the other wheels, and top up fluid.
Don't forget to re-inflate the spare to the correct pressure.
 

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The vacuum hose method is tried and proven but must be careful on the vw not to allow a vac leak and cause a cell. Although any vw owner should own a 20 buck scanner to check and clear cels. Just like you dont 100% need a special tool for compressing the rear caliper as a c clamp and channel locks works like a charm. It's all comes down to ability and budget. Neither method is right or wrong as they both achieve the identical end result when your are careful and cautious.




I no longer have to use the vac bleeding method as my kid is tall enough to reach the pedals!
 

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A C-clamp and a channel lock will rotate the caliper piston as it compresses? Sounds tricky. I think I'd rather just borrow the appropriate tool for free.
 

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A C-clamp and a channel lock will rotate the caliper piston as it compresses? Sounds tricky. I think I'd rather just borrow the appropriate tool for free.
As I said, I tried it that way, once. Also very tedious; tighten C-clamp until the piston adjust mechanism jams, rotate end of piston with channel locks to move it a little bit, then tighten C-clamp some more until the piston mechanism jams....and so on and so forth.
 
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