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the owner manual recommend to change the brake fluid every two years. what is the best way to do, so? would it be, best to loosen the front brake bleeder valve?
 

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My way. I take a 60cc syringe with extra large model airplane engine fuel line and draw the old fluid out of the brake fluid holder. Fill tank with new DOT 4 and begin bleeding at the rear brakes then front brakes. Don't forget to keep the brake fluid tank full.
 

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And don't forget the clutch, which is hydraulically powered by the brake system.

Bentley says...
1. Connect brake filler/bleeder
2. Remove insulation tray below engine/transmission
3. Connect bleed hose to slave cylinder and open bleed valve
4. Bleed about 100 cc (3.4 oz)
5. Depress the clutch several times

-K2
 

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CJH said:
Consider purchasing a Motive Products power bleeder. Inexpensive & very easy to use.

http://www.motiveproducts.com/02bleeders.html

Very handy, allows one person bleeding.
I second this. Bought a Motive on Ebay brand new for $45, including shipping. Power bleeding thru the master cylinder reservoir is the best way to go IMO. Did it myself, without removing wheels, in about an hour and a half, but I was taking my time since I've never used a power bleeder before. Could easily be done in an hour, or if you wanted to lift the car first and remove wheels, in probably less than a half hour.

Brake flush at the dealer is over $100!
 

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sweetp said:
My way. I take a 60cc syringe with extra large model airplane engine fuel line and draw the old fluid out of the brake fluid holder. Fill tank with new DOT 4 and begin bleeding at the rear brakes then front brakes. Don't forget to keep the brake fluid tank full.
I do the same, however I have been cautioned not to push the brake pedal all the way to the floor while bleeding the brakes, because it may damage the seals in the master cylinder.
 

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Its usually ok if the car is not too old, but pressing the pedal down slowly is a good idea to avoid turning the seals inside out.
On older cars the seals can wear the bore down creating a lip, pressing the pedal to the floor pushes the seals further than they are used to, which can tear them.
Be careful when getting it done by a garage tho, quite often they just empty the reservoir and refill it, who is going to check?
 

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SJUMBA said:
What is the process of bleeding through the master cylider? I just had mine done at the dealer and it was $100.
Search on this site, as well as general google search on brake bleeding, will tell you more than you'll ever want to know about brake bleeding. In a nutshell, there are several ways to bleed brakes. Thru the master cylinder is just one of them - I think it is the best for DIY but everyone has there own opinion.

In this process, you are going to be using pressure to push fluid thru the brake system, from the MC reservoir to each bleed valve. You need a pressure bleeder, like a Motive power bleeder or similar device, to create pressure at the MC reservoir. I siphon out old fluid at the reservoir first so as to not push "old" fluid unnecessarily thru the brake system. I then add new fluid, pressurize, and open each bleed valve in turn till the new fluid comes thru.

Others prefer to use a "vacuum" approach from each bleed valve. All depends on whether you want to push or pull - I think pushing is better.

A third way is the two man "pump and bleed" method.

All 3 will work if done "correctly". I prefer the Motive power bleeder, which can be purchased for less than $50. That, and an hour of your time, and a $5 can of DOT 4 and you're in business.

If you've never done it before, suggest you search and educate yourself on the different processes. They are pretty easy, but you need to understand the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

Good Luck.
 

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SJUMBA said:
Interesting. I wonder what method the VW dealer/tech employs?
My guess is they have a sophisticated high-end pressure bleeder that they connect to the reservoir, lift the car, open each bleed valve in turn until done. Probably can be done by one tech in 20 or 30 minutes tops, but the dealers around here charge for an hour, which is $93, plus cost of fluid.

Also be interesting to note if they overfill the reservoir, which is damn easy to do with a power bleeder, or "bleed down" to the MAX fill line correctly. With all the complaints about VW dealers "overfilling", especially oil crankcases, I wouldn't want to venture a guess here.
 
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