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Yup, that's the exact video I used just about a month ago. The changes I would make are:

1. There is no reason to mess with the wiper arm connection, at least not on my 2001.5 GLS model

2. I did not disconnect any of the red wires on the relay block, I just detached the relay block and let it hang.

3. I did not find it necessary to disconnect any of the quick connectors on the lower driver's side in the big cluster. Instead I cut the zip ties that hold the big bundle of wires that go to that group, to the metal dash support. This allowed enough slack to swing the dashboard out.

4. Watch out, there is a connector above the gas pedal that I don't think is shown in the vid. Almost pulled the wires out of the plug before I realized it was missed.

5. Loosen the nut on the steering rod u-joint clamp bolt not the torx screw side. Then use a pry bar to pop the bolt out.

Took me 4+ hours total to do the job (first time ever).

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

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Yup, that's the exact video I used just about a month ago. The changes I would make are:

1. There is no reason to mess with the wiper arm connection, at least not on my 2001.5 GLS model

2. I did not disconnect any of the red wires on the relay block, I just detached the relay block and let it hang.

3. I did not find it necessary to disconnect any of the quick connectors on the lower driver's side in the big cluster. Instead I cut the zip ties that hold the big bundle of wires that go to that group, to the metal dash support. This allowed enough slack to swing the dashboard out.

4. Watch out, there is a connector above the gas pedal that I don't think is shown in the vid. Almost pulled the wires out of the plug before I realized it was missed.

5. Loosen the nut on the steering rod u-joint clamp bolt not the torx screw side. Then use a pry bar to pop the bolt out.

Took me 4+ hours total to do the job (first time ever).

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
any chance you got a pic of those. he showed a 2 plug harness that i think was near the gas pedal, any chance you could verify that is what you are referring to?
 

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That is cool. Almost makes me want to try it just for fun ;)

And yes, you can see quite clearly in the video that the A/C lines were disconnected. I don't think you'd be able to move the dash out more than a few inches otherwise.
 

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I don't think that you'd be able to pull the dash (or, more accurately, the HVAC box) out at all without disconnecting the A/C lines. The pipes aren't going to stretch, you know.... ;)
 

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Greetings,

This may be a bit of a stretch. I was wondering if anyone has thought of an auxillary heater core to be constructed and placed in the space where the cabin filter resides. There may be one already manufactured that is small enough to fit in that space, and all one would do is connect with a series of t-tubes to the "auxillary" heater core from the inlet hose going to the heater core in the cabin. The return tube could be tapped into any one of a number of coolant hoses in the engine compartment, simplifying the routing of these hoses. I just hate thinking of tearing apart the cabin to get to the heater core as mine has failed just like those mentioned above, even after several flushings of the core in both directions. What do you tinkerers feel are the possibilities with this "work around"?
 

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Greetings,

This may be a bit of a stretch. I was wondering if anyone has thought of an auxillary heater core to be constructed and placed in the space where the cabin filter resides. There may be one already manufactured that is small enough to fit in that space, and all one would do is connect with a series of t-tubes to the "auxillary" heater core from the inlet hose going to the heater core in the cabin. The return tube could be tapped into any one of a number of coolant hoses in the engine compartment, simplifying the routing of these hoses. I just hate thinking of tearing apart the cabin to get to the heater core as mine has failed just like those mentioned above, even after several flushings of the core in both directions. What do you tinkerers feel are the possibilities with this "work around"?
I remember seeing a thread on someone doing this..... I think they used a ford heater core or something similar.
 

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I just came across a thread in the VWvortex.com website (a post in 2006) where a fellow talks about a coolant pump on the V-6s that circulates the coolant at idle rpms. He claims that the model years 2000 and up had these pumps. Can anyone verify that information? Even if untrue, I wonder if an electric pump installed somewhere in the coolant lines would at least solve the problem of poor heat output, especially at idle. As many of you have reported, when the car is at cruising speed, the heat output is satisfactory, but not at idle. Thanks.
 

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... a fellow talks about a coolant pump on the V-6s that circulates the coolant at idle rpms. He claims that the model years 2000 and up had these pumps. Can anyone verify that information?
Yes, AFAIK, all V6 Passats (AHA and ATQ engine codes) had this coolant recirc pump.

The drawback of placing any heater core where the pollen/cabin filter is you're forever stuck with pulling in outside air to heat the interior. Not too bad using ambient air on the coldest South AL February morning (driving to work in say 15F)...but over in OKC, the temps on that same Feb morning could easily be -15F; then your "heater core" is close to useless.
 

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The drawback of placing any heater core where the pollen/cabin filter is you're forever stuck with pulling in outside air to heat the interior. Not too bad using ambient air on the coldest South AL February morning (driving to work in say 15F)...but over in OKC, the temps on that same Feb morning could easily be -15F; then your "heater core" is close to useless.
This, and if you drive a lot of gravel roads (I do) you really want to keep your cabin air filter and change it regularly. I would also worry about the heater core in the air filter spot getting clogged with the dirt that the filter is supposed to keep out. Honestly, after watching the posted video a couple of times, this method to replace the heater core looks easier than a lot of them I've done.
 

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I just came across a thread in the VWvortex.com website (a post in 2006) where a fellow talks about a coolant pump on the V-6s that circulates the coolant at idle rpms. He claims that the model years 2000 and up had these pumps. Can anyone verify that information? Even if untrue, I wonder if an electric pump installed somewhere in the coolant lines would at least solve the problem of poor heat output, especially at idle. As many of you have reported, when the car is at cruising speed, the heat output is satisfactory, but not at idle. Thanks.
The V6 has an after-run coolant pump. It runs after the car is shut down.
 

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Just used that video and your tips and did it myself this weekend. What a difference from the 'prescribed' method. The Hayes Manual is the piece by piece deconstruction of the entire dash. This way was much more manageable, and no special tools (other than a good assortment of Torx bits required). Some additions to your additions injected inline below.

Yup, that's the exact video I used just about a month ago. The changes I would make are:

1. There is no reason to mess with the wiper arm connection, at least not on my 2001.5 GLS model

I had to take the wipers off in order to get the battery out. Taking out the battery isn't required per the video, but does make working in that area much easier. I did a bypass of the new heater core for the first flush so that allowed room for a flush tee to not push all the junk in the system through the brand new heater core. The 10mm under the cowl absolutely has to come off. I'm sure yours did too, but when I first read this I figured that 10mm bolt didn't have to come out.

2. I did not disconnect any of the red wires on the relay block, I just detached the relay block and let it hang.

This is a great tip. Worked a treat.

3. I did not find it necessary to disconnect any of the quick connectors on the lower driver's side in the big cluster. Instead I cut the zip ties that hold the big bundle of wires that go to that group, to the metal dash support. This allowed enough slack to swing the dashboard out.

I did both (cut zip tie and removed the connectors) to allow an extra 6" of wiggle room when getting the dash into the tipped position to replace the core. It took an extra 5 mins,
but was comforting to know it wouldn't be an issue.


4. Watch out, there is a connector above the gas pedal that I don't think is shown in the vid. Almost pulled the wires out of the plug before I realized it was missed.

Yes, there are three in there. Four actually if you count the acc. pedal wiring. I took a picture or two to illustrate.
20170819_131536.jpg
20170819_131527.jpg

5. Loosen the nut on the steering rod u-joint clamp bolt not the torx screw side. Then use a pry bar to pop the bolt out.

Another gem tip. Torx is a T40 for those keeping score. I needed the bit in order to tighten.

Took me 4+ hours total to do the job (first time ever).

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
Only other tidbit I'd add - the video shows an orange connector on the passenger side of the middle console under the dash. That is for climate control option only. I have mech temperature controls so that connector doesn't exist. I looked for it for a bit until I realized that it was optional.

I did the oil cooler while I was at it as the coolant was out anyway so figured it was a good time. That added about 3 hours to the process (long story) but all in all, this job is a casual full day. Half day if you are motivated. Doing it the second time, I could maybe get it done in 4 hours... ;)

Thanks for the info - these forums are the best thing to happen to the DIY'er since... well, I don't know anything else that is as handy.
 

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Greetings,

This may be a bit of a stretch. I was wondering if anyone has thought of an auxillary heater core to be constructed and placed in the space where the cabin filter resides. There may be one already manufactured that is small enough to fit in that space, and all one would do is connect with a series of t-tubes to the "auxillary" heater core from the inlet hose going to the heater core in the cabin. The return tube could be tapped into any one of a number of coolant hoses in the engine compartment, simplifying the routing of these hoses. I just hate thinking of tearing apart the cabin to get to the heater core as mine has failed just like those mentioned above, even after several flushings of the core in both directions. What do you tinkerers feel are the possibilities with this "work around"?
So i know this is hecka old but yes that does work. I used a mk3 or 4 jettas core in my 2001 vy passats cabin filter spot. Had to modify filter box a lil bit. But it worked well enough to keep windshield thawed in freezing rain and/or snow storms. Definitely woulda worked better had i taken time to figure out a way to enclose it completely
 

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I have a 2003 VW Passat 1.8. I just did the cabin air filter --> heater core 'fix.' We live in the Seattle area, and it will get below freezing, but not by much. This fix definitely isn't as good as actually replacing a heater core, but a $1200 fix on a $900 car wasn't worth it.

During the winter months, I have to run the A/C so the windows don't fog up. With it already cold outside, that just sucks. It makes driving an exhausting thing to do. With this installed, its not warm, but it takes the chill out of the air for sure. With the A/C running, it ends up being around 60 degrees inside when its 40 outside.

To install it, I bought some heater piping, some adapters, hose clamps and a small heater core (p/n: E92Z18476A), and went to work cutting plastic around the box that held the cabin air filter.

Question:

How would I seal around the edges of the heater core I installed? The core came with foam with an adheshive coating that didn't stick to anything. Right now, there's about a 1/4 to 1/2 inch gap around portions of the bottom of the core, which is room for plenty of unheated air to get through on its way to the inside of the cabin.
 

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Home Depot, etc, sells dispenser cans of expanding foam sealant ("Great Stuff" brand) for just this purpose, or almost this purpose. It would look like hell in my opinion but seal the leaks.
 

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You could also use vinyl trim pieces from a different aisle in Home Depot to fill the larger gaps. I used a piece with a rectangular cross section for some repairs; it would typically be used on a (house) door jamb.
 

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Home Depot, etc, sells dispenser cans of expanding foam sealant ("Great Stuff" brand) for just this purpose, or almost this purpose. It would look like hell in my opinion but seal the leaks.
This was my thought too. And if you do this, I'd get the stuff for windows which expands a bit less and be sure to leave at least 1/4" gap all around the area you want to seal. If the gap is too small the foam won't make it inside. And this stuff is MESSY! Wear disposable gloves and be very careful with it since it is almost impossible to get off when it sticks to something.
 
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