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I currently have Raxles on both sides of my car. I've had them since 2009, and 2010. I've had torn boots on each side once already, and they were repaired under warranty. Just noticed the right side is torn again. Each time, I have remove them, pay to ship them to Florida, wait a week, pay to ship them back. Seems like it's around $50 each time. I can get a Advance Auto Parts axle for that price, not sure I want to run one though. It would be nice to be able to run 5 minutes down the road if the boot tears again.

Anyone had experience with other axle brands?
 

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I'm running a NAPA passenger side axle out of necessity and it's been fine, but I have a manual. I think the general consensus on automatic cars is OEM or Raxles, otherwise you'll get vibrations at idle.
 

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X's 2 on climb_something.

See my post under 'vibration' I have a Car Quest/ World Pack axle and consensus tells me the vibration at idle is from this axle. I will try Raxel especially since you you are the 1st I have read or heard thats has any issues with them.

Vibration at idle is pretty darn annoying with this aftermarket. I talked with a guy at a VW dealership close to me and they hardly ever use a VW axle. They mentioned Car Quest also. I'll pass this time.....

Have you voiced your displeasure to Raxel???
 

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I got a genuine vw economy axle. This was the only one the dealer could get me. I have had no problems with it.
 

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I don't think there's anything you can do about CV boots, it's a design flaw, changing brands isn't going to result in longer lasting boots IMO. Best option is to get the boot replaced locally.
 

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wow. I've never seen (personally) a Raxles boot tear.
 

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I currently have Raxles on both sides of my car. I've had them since 2009, and 2010. I've had torn boots on each side once already, and they were repaired under warranty. Just noticed the right side is torn again. Each time, I have remove them, pay to ship them to Florida, wait a week, pay to ship them back. Seems like it's around $50 each time. I can get a Advance Auto Parts axle for that price, not sure I want to run one though. It would be nice to be able to run 5 minutes down the road if the boot tears again.
This illustrates my basic issue with the Raxles solution: If you can remove and replace your own driveshafts, then you certainly have the skills to put on some vinyl gloves and clean, re-lube, and re-boot the joint yourself. It's $15 or so for a kit and another half hour of work. CV joints last, for all practical purposes, forever if the grease is kept clean.
 

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(I suspect it's the added mass of a solid core axle, since the OEM axles are hollow. )

If that is the case, it would make sense to make sure are replacement on the other side is from the same non-OEM supplier.

For the record I now have a solid on the left and an OEM (original) on the right and I notice no idle vibration.
 

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This illustrates my basic issue with the Raxles solution: If you can remove and replace your own driveshafts, then you certainly have the skills to put on some vinyl gloves and clean, re-lube, and re-boot the joint yourself. It's $15 or so for a kit and another half hour of work. CV joints last, for all practical purposes, forever if the grease is kept clean.
+1. It's a very messy job but not difficult to replace a boot. I just replaced 2 boots on my wife's Subaru and did not even have to remove the axles. It was possible to simply disconnect the shaft from the joint, install a new boot and then re-assemble. Good thing too since the boots are about 3" from the exhaust :crazy:
 

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I suspect it's the added mass of a solid core axle, since the OEM axles are hollow.
All other things being equal (amount of steel, length) the tubular shaft will tend to be stiffer in torsion than the solid bar, which is springier. At idle there are about 20 speed pulses per second (if a four cylinder) so if solid driveshaft-differential-solid driveshaft assembly naturally vibrated at 20 Hz in the rotation mode, the engine pulses would match and the vibration would be worse. Stiffer driveshafts would have a higher natural frequency, above idle RPM, so you won't feel as much vibration.
 

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+1. It's a very messy job but not difficult to replace a boot. I just replaced 2 boots on my wife's Subaru and did not even have to remove the axles. It was possible to simply disconnect the shaft from the joint, install a new boot and then re-assemble. Good thing too since the boots are about 3" from the exhaust :crazy:
There's a video out there for doing that with our cars too. To remove the joint from the shaft, he inserts a ca. 3 1/8" rod into where the axle bolt goes. Then he screws the axle bolt in, which levers against that rod to pull the joint off.
 

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These videos here? Pretty clever, but seems like it would be a bit easier to go ahead and remove the other end from the transmission to make it a bit easier to work on.

I think at this point I'm going to pick up one from Advance Auto to have as a spare while I get my Raxles repaired under warranty. If the Advance axle is crap, I may try to find a used OEM one to use/rebuild/keep as a spare. This information will come in handy next time when there's not a time crunch. I'm sure the other side will tear again before too long.
 

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This illustrates my basic issue with the Raxles solution: If you can remove and replace your own driveshafts, then you certainly have the skills to put on some vinyl gloves and clean, re-lube, and re-boot the joint yourself. It's $15 or so for a kit and another half hour of work. CV joints last, for all practical purposes, forever if the grease is kept clean.
I agree. In fact, I highly recommend replacing the outer joint yourself if it's warranted. It's cheaper than replacing the entire axle with a Raxles unit and will probably last longer. A new joint will come with a new boot kit. You should always inspect the joint before reassembling it. If it looks excessively worn then it's time for a replacement. One thing you could do in a pinch is swap the outer joints from side to side. The worn area will be on the opposite side of the ball cage since you do very little driving in reverse so that side should have virtually no wear. You'll still need a new boot kit, but they're dirt cheap compared to a new joint or axle. I wouldn't recommend it as a long term solution, but it will get you back on the road while you're waiting for a replacement joint. You can probably find new boot kits at a local auto parts store.

I just watched the first couple minutes of the posted video and have just one comment. Unless you want to wrench your back trying to loosen the axle bolt, insert the breaker bar so it's vertical or as near vertical as you can get it. Grab the bar and pull it in the direction needed to loosen the bolt. This allows you to use your full body weight as leverage to loosen the bolt without hurting yourself. My son-in-law, who is 6'2" and weighs at least 50 lbs. more than me and more than 30 years younger, tried to loosen a lug nut in the same manner the video shows and he couldn't budge it. I did it the way I described and broke it loose right off the bat. I've never had a problem loosening a wheel bolt on any Passat or Audi using this method, and I've loosened quite a few.
 

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German Auto Parts CV Axles are competitively priced with no core charge.

I'll give them a try on my AWM later this month - my pass. CV Axle is on its last legs (vibration under strong acceleration due to CV joint wear).

If both CV joints are new (i.e. Raxles or German Auto Parts or dealership sourced Lobro or other dealership axle), there should be no vibration from the axles. Any other (under $150 price) replacement axle from your corner auto parts store will not have new CV joints - the cages have been reground and slightly larger ball bearings have been fitted. Each CV joint wears at different rates, so once you get past ~50% of the usable life of the axle, it will at first become unbalanced during strong acceleration...then a few months later, you notice the imbalance under weak acceleration...then while coasting...then you start to worry about the car leaving you stranded on a December Tuesday at 5:30pm in a 38F rainstorm. (Nope, not again - I'll change this one before Christmas, somehow)
 

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Ive had a pair of cheap AutoZone axles on for about 30K with no problems. No vibrations or wobbles. They were all I could afford at the time but I would buy them again.
 

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"These videos here? Pretty clever, but seems like it would be a bit easier to go ahead and remove the other end from the trans"

Possibly, but removing and retorquing the axle bolts takes a good bit of time and is awkward without a lift (plus the triple-square bit falls out of the socket on every bolt, so 12 times :) ). I think the fly in the ointment of the Slavic method in the video would be getting the joint back on. That looks like a two-man job for sure, one to hold steady and one to whack.
 

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...but removing and retorquing the axle bolts takes a good bit of time and is awkward without a lift (plus the triple-square bit falls out of the socket on every bolt, so 12 times :) ). I think the fly in the ointment of the Slavic method in the video would be getting the joint back on. That looks like a two-man job for sure, one to hold steady and one to whack.
I just use a bit of making tape on the bit to jam it in the socket, so that the bit won't fall out. Then, with lug bolts threaded back into the hub, rotate that until an inner CV cap screw is accessible, and hold the hub from turning with a pipe or bar with one end on the floor, the other end between two of the lug bolts. With a long extension for your ratchet wrench, you just sit beside the car and move the jamming bar every time the hub needs to be turned to remove another screw.

Regarding the installation of the outer joint, I'm not a fan of pounding on the end of a driveshaft, not held in a bench vice.
 
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